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Chronic 2001 - Dr. Dre

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Genre: Hip-Hop & Rap - Gangsta & Hardcore / Artist: Dr.Dre / Import / Audio CD released at Mca

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      28.10.2010 17:20
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      Anyone with a slight interest in rap owes it to themselves to get this album.

      Despite it's name Chronic 2001 was released in 1999, the second solo album of Dr.Dre, whose G Funk sounds in his production are the foundations of which Gangsta rap was built on. The first solo album of the ex-N.W.A. man was the Chronic, which was critically acclaimed at it's time of release.

      This album is littered with guest artists, with the likes of Snoop Dogg, Eminem, Xzibit etc. taking turns to boast about some aspect of living in the hood. This is a good thing as it it keeps the album interesting for the listener (adding a bit of variety) and also means Dre doesn't spend too much time behind the mike (allegedly he had ghost writers write his lyrics). Another thing this album is littered with are rather cringe worthy skits about the Doctor's sexual prowess. Why these are included in the album I don't know, they aren't in the least bit funny and are infuriating to the listener.

      Fortunately that's the only really bad thing I have to say about this album. The beats on this album are funky and infectious, complementing the often dark lyrical themes present. The lyrics are explicit slices of life in the hood. They are horrible but at the same time brilliant. The only time when the lyrics overstep the mark are on the seventh song "What's the Difference" where Eminem spits a needlessly violent verse about murdering his wife (surprise,surprise!) which ruins an otherwise cool and catchy song. However Eminem makes up for that lapse with the ecxellent collaboration with Dre on Forget About Dre, an absolutely brilliant song that delivers a vicious message to all those who thought the Doc was gone. Probably the best song on the album.

      Other highlights are the appearances of Snoop Dogg on the songs "Still Dre" and "The Next Episode" with some very creative uses of samples from instruments you would not expect in a rap album in both songs. The Watcher and Let's Get High are more bright spots. The album drops off only slightly in the latter third, ending with the worst track on the album "The Message", a sappy tribute to Dre's late brother featuring overglossed vocals from Mary Blige.

      Overall "Chronic 2001" is one of the best "Gangsta Rap" albums out there. While maybe not as flawless as it's predecessor, ten years later it still proves Dre is one of the most influential figures in rap.

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      02.06.2010 17:05
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      Buy this album, now

      Dr Dre - 2001

      Strangely, the album known as 2001 (or 'The Chronic 2001') was actually released in 1999. Great hype surrounded this album after a seven year wait for Dr Dre to release a follow up to his highly thought of debut album' The Chronic'.

      With his first album so highly thought of, why would you change the formula? The answer is you wouldn't and he didn't. This follow up has many guest spots, famous ghost-writers, mostly Dr Dre produced tracks and a number of funny interludes - all like its predecessor. The worry of course would be if the use of a successful formula now dated by seven years would still be successful for his new album. Remove that worry.

      Whilst the formula hasn't changed the music has been updated drastically with many circles of hip hop producers playing catch-up to the new sound that Dre exploded into rap music with this album (it was only the emergence of the Neptune's sound a few years later that could advance hip hop further).

      Such songs as 'Xxplosive' with its peaceful guitar riff ringing throughout were innovative and exciting upon their release and have already endured the test of time (over ten years since its release and it is still every bit as enjoyable). It's a track that you can sing along every word to for years and not once even consider what the song is about (it is about ladies if you're interested), and it doesn't even matter such is the easy listening feeling it creates. It is an all-time rap classic.

      The musical updates on tracks such as 'Lets Get High' and 'Bang Bang' show great examples of what Dre is capable of, but only small advances in music when you compare it to some of the album's biggest hits such as 'Forgot About Dre' and the Jay Z penned 'Still D.R.E'.

      'Forgot About Dre' is a fast paced, electric ride through the aggression felt at people forgetting about one of raps all time greats after just a seven year (semi) hiatus. The lyrics demonstrate his vast influence on contemporary hip hop whilst the song's featuring artist, Eminem, delivers a ruthless verse in his Slim Shady persona attacking a random pedestrian. This song didn't win a grammy for nothing.

      'Still D.R.E.' has a constant banging piano riff that makes you want to buy a '64 and fix hydraulics yourself (or alternatively just nod your head excessively) with some of the most incredible lyrics included on a Dr Dre record. Ghost-written by Jay Z, the lyrics remind you of just how great Dr Dre is and despite his seven year break between albums he has still been busy keeping rap alive "Kept my ears to the street, signed Eminem/ He's, triple platinum doing 50 a week, STILL/"

      To have covered a number of the album's tracks and still not mentioned 'What's The Difference' or 'Next Episode' (to name a few) is a tribute to the wealth of music found on the album. 'What's The Difference' featuring XZibit & Eminem takes aim at the 'haters' these rappers have had to endure throughout their careers and goes some way to demonstrating the great differences between them (what's the difference between me and you?/about five bank accounts, three ounces and two vehicles!). 'Next Episode' see's the return of the back and forth rapping that proved so popular on The Chronic's hit single 'Nuthin But A G Thang' and really is an appropriate 'next episode' of that classic track.

      Other album standouts include the album's first song 'The Watcher' - one of Dre's darker songs but still comes complete with catchy chorus and memorable lyrics, and 'Fu*k You', a song which, to put nicely, is about making love to a woman.

      Every track on this album features at least one guest, but that is far from a complaint such is the quality of rapping friends Dr Dre has included. Other songs on this album, take 'Lightspeed' for example, would be standout tracks on other rap albums in history but fall slightly off the standard set by Xxplosive, Forgot About Dre etc

      Unfortunately the quality of the majority of the tracks is going to take away from some of the (and I use this word loosely) 'inferior' tracks on the album. There isn't a bad song on the album but songs like 'Murder Ink' and 'Ackrite' are never going to be as memorable or impressive as any of the tracks already mentioned. There is also 'Big Ego's' which from my opinion has an annoying and basic chorus, although I have many friends who pick it as one of their best on the album so maybe it's just a personal gripe. Overall you have got to be seriously against music as a whole to not find at least some of the tracks enjoyable and be highly anticipating Dre's next (and final) album 'Detox'. If Detox ever does see the light of day and is released then it has a whole lot to live upto because 2001 certainly surpasses the rap classic 'The Chronic'.

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        28.04.2009 13:42
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        Great.

        I know that this is not exactly a new relases (as it was released on 16 November 1999), but I listened to it this morning on my way into work on my ipod for the first time in ages and I was prompted to write a review of it, as it is in my opinion the best rap/hip-hop album out there.

        Andre Rommell Young, better known as Dr Dre has a massive influence over the world of Hip Hop. '2001' was the long awaited follow up to 'Chronic', Dr Dre's seminal 1992 release. His has recruited his 'friends and associates' again, old faithful Snoop Doggy Dogg is on board, as is Dre's main man, Eminem. Of course, 2001 is filthy, filled with sexist skits, simulated orgies, and much phallic boasting - none of which should diminish Dre's achievement. I think you have to tka eit as it is and not worry about it or get too offended.

        If any rap producer deserves the title ''composer,'' it is Dre. One gets the feeling he wanted to reestablish his mastery of the form, to show the current crop of youngbloods (Juvenile and Young Bleed) how it's done.

        The album included popular hit singles "Still D.R.E." and "Forgot About Dre" which even when I hear now make me want to get up and dance and send tingles down my spine. Still D.R.E. was co written by Jay-Z and is seen as an annoucement of his return to the hip hop scene, as does Forgot about Dre in an aggressive manner. Although these are without doubt the highlights on the album, it is full of great hip hop trackes, includingXxplosive and The Watcher, two excellent tracks.

        The lyrics on the album are exactly what you'd expect; overblown depictions of gangsta life, complete with excessive swearing, violent descriptions, bitches, hoes and, in the hilarious skit Pause 4 Porno, a massive orgy ending in a tragic ejaculatory injury - this you will not get from Will Smith and if you are easily offended, be warned! It is kind of a cliche of his life and very much over the top about everything. Dr Dre does not seem to be a fan of women's rights, so again, try not to take offence at this!

        My advice is if you like hip hop then you must have already heard this album. I love it and will be listening to it more often.

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          23.12.2008 16:22
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          Dr. Dre's second album

          "2001" is confusingly the title to Dr. Dre's 1999 album, which came as his second solo piece. It has him do all the production and a little rapping alongside some of his fellow West Coast-ers and other Gangsta Rap artists from around the US.

          1. "Lolo" (Intro)

          2. "The Watcher"

          This is a funky one which has Dre open things up as he tlaks us through what his life has become, in what has been a long streth even back nine years ago. We are told of his move out of 'the hood' to a more stable setting, to prevent himself to falling back into the system.

          **Four Stars**

          3. "F**k You"

          This was the big comeback single from Dr. Dre, and he did so whilst attempting to launch the career of another as he aided, a previously unknown, Devin The Dude, of H-Town (Houston, Texas). With this one you get them rapping with Snoop on how they just want to get busy with a girl.

          **Five Stars**

          4. "Still D.R.E."

          For me, this is tied with "The Next Episode" as the best track on the whole of this relase. It is an absolute banger and has Dre re-establish himself as what he claimed to be back in the N.W.A days, and even earlier along with his partner in crime, Snoop Dogg. This is a future classic and shows how the West had advanced from the G-Funk of the mid-ninties.

          **Five Stars**

          5. "Big Egos"

          This one was not only prodcued by Dre, but by the former Roots bassist, Scott Storch, you can only be seen as omeone here to improve on the work. Here you get a rather dark ne as you get it based upon some haunting piano work as Dre and Hittman rap.

          **Four Stars**

          6. "Xxplosive"

          Having returned to this album several years since I last went through the whole thing, I had forgotten quite a few track, however the production in this one was something I could never forget, and it completely takes over as you get something smooth with some post-G-Funk synth.

          **Five Stars**

          7. "What's the Difference"

          To those not that familiar with Dre, you make the mistake of thining that the beat from this one was jacked from Blu Cantrell's "Breathe", which featured Sean Paul, whereas this one came before, and the 2003 tune sampled this one. It has Xzibit and then-new Aftermath signee Eminem.

          **Five Stars**

          8. "Bar One" (Intro)

          9. "Light Speed"

          In comparison to the rest of the album, this one is rather boring and is nothing more than a fller from him. On it you have him quite clearly using some old G-Funk beats with a little more updated soudns as he just kicks a few standard raps with little energy.

          **Three Stars**

          10. "Forgot About Dre"

          I hae to say that this is the only track wheere I can say I liekd Eminem ever. It has him completely ip the tune apart with some speedy rhymes to accompanmy Dre as he raps about all tha he has done for the music game, not only with his role in the creation of Gangsta Rap (by brinign the names Ice Cube, Eazy-E and N.W.A up), but before this with the World-Class Wreckin' Cru.

          **Five Stars**

          11. "The Next Episode"

          Here is one of the massive singles off the album and has Dre and Snoop team up once again to bring "The Next Episode", which had been in working since "Nuttin' But A 'G' Thang" in 1992. Not only do you get these, but others closely associted with him such as Tha Dogg Pound's Kurupt and Nate Dogg get a chance to lays down some lines for this legendary tune.

          **Five Stars**

          12. "Let's Get High"

          You have to say that this is a complete banger, and one of the top tunes from this record. it has Dre bring back the early ninties where he introduced the world to G-Funk as he gets into some funky, high-energy beats for you to groove to, fitting in nicely amongst so much New School material.

          **Five Stars**

          13. "B***h N****z"

          Thsi is a very dark one and has Sixx-Two, Hittman, Snoop and Dre himself rapping on some slow, bassy production which focuses on all of those who are only into friendship when money is involved. Past experiences of this are all brought back up here, and they make sure that the messages get to all of those in question.

          **Five Stars**

          14. "The Car Bomb" (Lude)

          15. "Murder Ink"

          Sandwiched between two skits we have a short hardcore Gangsta Rap track by Dre as gets Ms. Roq and Hittman to aid him in giving some real West Coast culture to the masses as they talk about all that it is to be a fully-fledged G out in South Central LA.

          **Four Stars**

          16. "Ed-ucation" (Lude)

          17. "Some L.A. N****z"

          For this on you get a throwback as you are initally greated by the ex-N.W.A member MC Ren on the mic(rophone), before a host of Los Angeles names get a chance to show their lyrical skills off including the likes of Hittman, Time Bomb, Defari, Xzibit, King Tee, Knoc-turn'al, and Kokane.

          **Four Stars**

          18. "Pause 4 Porno" (Lude)

          19. "Housewife"

          On this one you get Dre and DPG's Kurupt sending out an important message to many maturing blacks who may not be aware opf the fact that turing a "Ho Into A Housewife" is an impossibel task as they two aren't even comparible in what they represent, or are able to offer as women.

          **Five Stars**

          20. "Ackrite"

          I was highly surprised to read that this one didn't smaple a previously-recorded P-Funk tune or something as the beat to it sounds as if it came straight out of this era, but being so in-tune with these years, Dre was abl to come up with a melody to fit in with his style, without having to tkae old tunes to do it. Hittman has a track to himself here, and he uses this opportunity effectively.

          **Five Stars**

          21. "Bang Bang"

          Here is some heavy Gangsta Rap to stop people thinking that he is going to slow things up as the album draws towards a close. It has the duo of Hittman and Knoc-turn'al make the most of the hardcore beats, complete with gunshots soudn effects.

          **Four Stars**

          22. "The Message"

          To end things, we get a conscious track as Dre shows out to his brother, and talks about all the lost potenial which came about with his pre-mature death on some gentle Lord Finesse beats, to give him all which is needed to give him the power to get his message across.

          **Four Stars**

          This album is often considered to be a future classic, and the perfect follow-up to "Chronic" which came be said to be nothing less than this. However for me, it is a little overrated and although it doesn't have any clar weak points, Dre does let himself down by putting in a filler and lots of interludes between tracks. The production in this album is amazing and the guests chosen to use them fitted it perfectly.

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            26.07.2004 22:00
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            Dr. Dre began his career with the World Class Wreckin' Cru, moving on to NWA before striking out on his own as a solo artist. His work with NWA saw a huge explosion in the popularity of Gangsta Rap. He has produced albums for many new stars such as Eminem and Eve. Anyway, enough of Dre and on to the CD. This is a CD i've had for a good few years now and it has never strayed far from the top of my CD pile, has never been left behind when i've gone on holiday and never misses an appearance at any party i have. To put it quite simply this CD is a true classic, its absolutely timeless. I have yet to meet a person who didn't like this CD, even my dad gave it a listen and was pleasantly surprised. As well as Dre there are plenty of featuring artists including Snoop Dogg, Nate Dogg, Eminem, Mary J Blige, Xzibit and Devin. There are tracks on here that most will know such as the fabulous 'Next Episode', released in 1999 but still a favourite in clubs now. Also 'Forgot About Dre' with Eminem and 'Still D.R.E' with Snoop. There is not a single track on here that isn't good in its own way although some are a little more bland the others. A few of the songs towards the end of the album aren't as classic and memorable as those on the first half of the album but none are anything less than good. There is a real mixture of sounds on the album ranging from loud and good to dance to like 'Next Episode', to a beautiful tribute to his dead brother, called 'The Message'. There isn't much else i can say, this album is a must have for anyone with a love of rap and even with no previous interest in rap at all.

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            12.10.2001 02:13
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            How do you age in hip-hop and maintain your edge? The music is even more youth-driven than rock & roll – and that's saying something. Its young audience, both white and black, is obsessed with novelty in all its forms: new faces, new sounds, new fashions and new ways to flow. In that context, Dr. Dre, at 34, is a rap Methuselah. Sure, he revolutionized the music over and over again -- first with the gang-banging N.W.A, then with his solo debut The Chronic (which launched Snoop Doggy Dogg). And, earlier this year, he produced Eminem’s Slim Shady LP, the album that made today's world safe for white rappers. But in this time of short attention spans, what hope could there be for Dre on the current scene? Plenty. Dre comes out blazing on 2001, keeping his beats fresh and defining a persona for himself that takes his fabled history into full account. On "The Watcher," a thumping track that Dre informs with his characteristic menace, the rapper declares, "Nigga, if you really wanna take it there, we can/Just remember that you fuckin' with a family man/I got a lot more to lose than you/Remember that, when you wanna come to fill these shoes." That achievement and, of all things, a settled relationship can make you harder rather than softer is about as bold an idea as can be put forward in contemporary music. Not that 2001 is a "mature" album in any conventional sense. Hoes and bitches – i.e., women – come in for their usual abuse, gunshots explode, weed burns, and profanity rings out on nearly every one of the album's 22 tracks. Snoop and Eminem pay tribute to their mentor with their trademark mayhem. And Dre reigns over it all – a master of the game who has come back to demonstrate exactly how it's done.

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              06.10.2001 04:49
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              “Things just ain’t the same for gangstas, times is changin’ young niggaz is agin’” This is how Dre begins his highly anticipated Chronic 2001 album. This represents the more contemplative less KrayZeE AzZ GeE that Da Chronic brings. The Watcher serves as a fitting intro to the new Dre. He’s still cool, still pretending to smoke a lot of weed, but he’s thinking more now. I wasn’t sure I was buying the new Dre when I first got 2001. Of course, I had to love it regardless if it was Dre rapping over a Xylophone. (cough, No Limit, cough, cough). Dre isn’t the kind of rapper who is highly political or that you think you really want to get too far past G Thang with. He takes a lot risks on 2001, and most of them pay big dividends. That said, “Still DRE” really is the best song on the album. It creates the same magical feelings that "Let Me Ride", "G Thang", and Dre Day did and do. It makes you bob your head and feel Dre. It’s such a relief! Whatever has happened in 10 years, he’s still Dre. When I heard this song on MTV before the album was released I almost broke down and cried. It’s so well done and perfect. It’s Dre circa 1991. It’s so not Jay-Z and Nas. He’s representin’ for the gangstas all across the world - flat out. The next time the album hits rare air is "What’s the Difference". There are good songs in between but this is the next time Dre strikes gold, or should I say platinum. Dre gives a nod to the classic Renzo in a Benzo line and the song just takes off from there, Dre is real, Em is crazy, and X to the Z is hard core. It’s a great blend with a nice edge and a somewhat ridiculous beat. "Forgot About Dre" is good, but not one of my favorites. “The Nest Episode” completes the cycle of top shelf songs. Wow, it truly is the next episode. Dre and Snoop
              put on a clinic and it is a beautiful experience. My only complaint is that it’s too short. We need another verse here. I won’t dwell on it, because the song is as good as rap music gets. Also, I have to give the nod to Nate Dogg here. Any rap song can be improved with a dash of Nate Dogg. The second half of the CD is somewhat unremarkable. Dre gives just about everyone on the Aftermath label a test drive. I like some of the stuff, but most times you’re better off to just listen to the first half twice. This is why I give this revolutionary album an 8. Dre can do better than the second half of this album and we all know it. I like “Some LA Niggaz” and “Murder Ink” but they can’t hide the fact that the second half is a lot of filler. Overall, the second real Dre album is a rousing success. It has a lot of good songs, and a few GREAT songs. Dre has mellowed, and this isn’t as good as the original, but it’s sinfully close. He truly is Still the Dre we all know and love.

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                27.09.2001 00:41
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                "Haters say Dre fell off -- how nigga? My last album was 'The Chronic'" Couldn't have put it any better myself. So we haven't seen an album (or should I say a compilation) under his name in almost a decade -- in fact the closest we got was the rather lukewarm "Dr. Dre Presents The Aftermath". Needless to say some people will have written Dre off; but then again, people said the same thing after N.W.A. broke up right? That's what's great about Dr. Dre - he's always hungry and he LOVES being the spoiler. He relishes the role, and this album is living proof. Dr. Dre's protege Mel-Man splits production duties with Dre on this track; but the student obviously learned well from the master - you won't hear any "lesser" or "inferior" songs on here - every song is a quality cut. The cast is a rotating group of hot new artists, old familiar friends, and up and comers we've never seen before. Of these, the one who appears the most often and makes the most impact is Hittman, who shows up on nine songs. The best of these is probably "Bitch Niggaz" with Dr. Dre and Snoop - a gangster twist on the old classic "Bitches Ain't Shit". Check out these hilarious lyrics from Mr. Hitt: "Man, you shit on Hitt, get yo' shit bust; plus pistol-whipped, cover it up - use yo' bitch's blush Mr. Powder Puff yo', bark ain't loud enough, huh I know chihuahuas that's mo' rah-rah, HA HA I have to laugh Dre, I bet he take bubble baths" But if you really want comedy, you need to check for Eminem on Dr. Dre's first "triple cadence" rap, the high-octane "Forgot About Dre". "I don't give a fuck if it's dark or not I'm harder than me tryin to park a Dodge when I'm drunk as fuck Right next to a humungous truck in a two car garage "
                Dre's theme for the music to accompany such raps is simple: Keep It FUNKY, Stupid. You'll hear a big chunky horn section on "What's the Difference", simmering piano keys on "Big Ego's", and what I can only assume are some HIGH caliber keyboards on "Bang Bang" since they unload with the power of the song title. This is one of those albums that you truly can listen to from start to finish. Appropriately enough for that idea, Dre starts out the album with "The Watcher" wherein he discusses how the rap scene has changed, and closes with "The Message" - a dedication to his fallen brother Tyree. Rap critics come and go, and rap magazines come and go, but artists will keep on making music regardless. Dr. Dre knows this. These songs could have been written just from a " fuck you too" perspective, but Dre proves that the best revenge is still being around to enjoy the fruits of your labor. Undoubtedly he will since he has made not only one of the best albums of 1999 but the best for a few years to come. How appropriate then that he would skip over the much overhyped year 2000 and go straight to the TRUE new millenium with "The Chronic 2001".

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                  19.08.2001 21:31

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                  Let's just be up-front here: Dr. Dre 2001 is no The Chronic. But then it probably wouldn't be fair to expect an artist to redefine an entire musical genre more than once per decade. If Chronic ushered in the gangsta-rap era and established Los Angeles' hip-hop scene as a worthy sister to New York's, 2001 updates the formula rather than revolutionizing it. Back when The Chronic dropped, the source of the album's impact was its sound rather than its verse. After years of dry, staccato beats from the East Coast, Dre composed an album for the West Coast riders, pressing sweet, sticky funk from keyboards and basslines. 2001 is more on the minimalist tip, with piano stabs and guitar licks as the weapons of choice. Rather than orchestrate ghetto symphonics with the full sound of synthesizers, Dre's use of sharp piano chords accentuate tension, making 2001 into a soundtrack for an imaginary suspense film. Diversifying the album's sonics are tracks like "F*ck You", a slinky number with funky guitar licks and soul claps. Likewise, "Xplosive" (RealAudio excerpt) resurrects some of the laid-back smoothness of Chronic (1992), with its chicken-scratch melody and laconic drum shuffles. As for Dre, he makes his presence felt as the wise — if not quite mature — elder of the bunch. Dre invited a whole posse of guest MCs to participate on 2001, including Snoop Dogg, whose effortless gangsta twang was crucial to The Chronic's success. Though Snoop's overexposure has diminished his impact somewhat, his loping, slanguage-filled flow manages to retain its charms on songs such as "The Next Episode." Newbie Hitman gets the lion's share of the cameo work but is relatively ineffectual in terms of his presence (in an age when gangsta rap is the norm rather than the exception, the Hitman simply doesn't distinguish himself). The more exciting guest is Xzibit, best
                  known for his Likwit Crew (Alkaholiks, King Tee, etc.) affiliation. Xzibit provides a rare blend of gangsta menace with lyrical prowess on such songs as "What's the Difference" and "Some L.A. Sh*t." As for Dre, he makes his presence felt as the wise — if not quite mature — elder of the bunch. His verses on "The Watcher" (RealAudio excerpt) bear the calm cool of an MC who's been around the block a couple times and is equal parts cynic and idealist.

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                  09.08.2001 02:02
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                  Couldn't have put it any better myself. So we haven't seen an album (or should I say a compilation) under his name in almost a decade -- in fact the closest we got was the rather lukewarm "Dr. Dre Presents The Aftermath". Needless to say some people will have written Dre off; but then again, people said the same thing after N.W.A. broke up right? That's what's great about Dr. Dre - he's always hungry and he LOVES being the spoiler. He relishes the role, and this album is living proof. Dr. Dre's protege Mel-Man splits production duties with Dre on this track; but the student obviously learned well from the master - you won't hear any "lesser" or "inferior" songs on here - every song is a quality cut. The cast is a rotating group of hot new artists, old familiar friends, and up and comers we've never seen before. Of these, the one who appears the most often and makes the most impact is Hittman, who shows up on nine songs. The best of these is probably "Bitch Niggaz" with Dr. Dre and Snoop - a gangster twist on the old classic "Bitches Ain't Shit". Check out these hilarious lyrics from Mr. Hitt: "Man, you shit on Hitt, get yo' shit bust; plus pistol-whipped, cover it up - use yo' bitch's blush Mr. Powder Puff yo', bark ain't loud enough, huh I know chihuahuas that's mo' rah-rah, HA HA I have to laugh Dre, I bet he take bubble baths" But if you really want comedy, you need to check for Eminem on Dr. Dre's first "triple cadence" rap, the high-octane "Forgot About Dre". "I don't give a fuck if it's dark or not I'm harder than me tryin to park a Dodge when I'm drunk as fuck Right next to a humungous truck in a two car garage " Dre's theme for the music to accompany such raps is simple: Keep It FUNKY, Stupid. You'
                  ;ll hear a big chunky horn section on "What's the Difference", simmering piano keys on "Big Ego's", and what I can only assume are some HIGH caliber keyboards on "Bang Bang" since they unload with the power of the song title. This is one of those albums that you truly can listen to from start to finish. Appropriately enough for that idea, Dre starts out the album with "The Watcher" wherein he discusses how the rap scene has changed, and closes with "The Message" - a dedication to his fallen brother Tyree. Rap critics come and go, and rap magazines come and go, but artists will keep on making music regardless. Dr. Dre knows this. These songs could have been written just from a " fuck you too" perspective, but Dre proves that the best revenge is still being around to enjoy the fruits of your labor. Undoubtedly he will since he has made not only one of the best albums of 1999 but the best for a few years to come. How appropriate then that he would skip over the much overhyped year 2000 and go straight to the TRUE new millenium with "The Chronic 2001".

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                    07.07.2001 07:43
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                    It’s ‘Chronic’ in more than one sense of the word. The much-vaunted outing from one of hip-hop’s undoubted innovators owes a lot to the 1992 debut solo album, but the blatant lack of fresh ideas and radical movement from Andre Young’s well worn formula suggest maybe the good Doctor is trying to win acclaim on reputation alone. The diagnosis ? Decidedly unhealthy. Dre needs no introduction – he single-handedly turned hip hop into a venom-spitting artform, producing tracks rife with intelligence and almost futuristic difference that saw him tower head and shoulders above the rest in the game. That was then. This is now. And still, Dre takes on the persona of someone thinking now would be a real good time for one more g-funk/gangsta rap renaissance. After all, he’s roped in his old Death Row buddies Snoop Dogg and Kurupt amongst a cast of nearly two-thousand-and-one in for the old skool reunion – what could possibly go wrong ? The titles of each track in this hotchpotch of unoriginality seem to bear some semblance to questions music hacks will no doubt be clamouring over, having heard the symptoms before delivering what should be a damning autopsy. A strict diet of chugging breaks that if any steadier would stand still altogether, minimal keys that barely change tact and ludicrous gangster-choruses to add some supposed overground respectability to the whole regime are the prescription. The after-effects ? One presumes a serious amount of head-scratching rather than head-nodding. At times listening becomes a chore, and on occasion one track could quite conceivably be any of six or seven more that follow but for the odd hi-hat tweak or change in bass pattern. ‘The Watcher’, reflecting how Dre has let new ideas pass him by, plods along apologetically with an even sorrier-sounding strings and keys section forcing the Doc to stretch his lo-fi lyrics in order to keep up with the not-ove
                    rly tricky beats. ‘What’s The Difference’ – precisely – is lined with g-funk atmospherics but not much else, and only the much-needed velocity of Xzibit and raucousness of the ass-kissing Eminem give the track some positives to hang onto. ‘Bitch Niggaz’ is far too laid back for its own good despite some suitable musings from Dogg, ‘Some LA Niggaz’ suffers from the same lack of urgency in an ultimately tedious stop-start struggle; while ‘Forgot About D.R.E’ attempts to emulate the Bones Thugs n Harmony style of speaking at a million miles an hour just for the sake of an extra aimless BPM’s. Eminem stars, Dre indeed forgettable, the intended menace laughable, the bemusement – well, no doubt, extreme. With proceedings threatening to flatline totally, Dre actually manages to turn in some genuine genius, without actually veering off to anything significantly different. ‘Fuck You’ is the volley offered to any doubters with a deliciously distorted hook and real NWA feel, although is there really any place for the characteristic inclusion of such commercially crass choruses ? ‘Still D.R.E.’ maintains the man’s position with some beefier breaks backdropping choppy keys and quirky stabs – again, though, the delivery isn’t as fluid as it should be and at times seems stifled for a single that received mad props upon its release. ‘XXPlosive’ should be brought before the Trade Descriptions Act despite its sassy guitar hook over cumbersome beats and the silky barking of Nate Dogg; while we finally experience the trademark Dre notoriety on ‘Murder Ink’. Creeping menace with shimmering keys and intimidating one-chord bass harness whispering death threats and a momentary g-funk riff that symbolises the Doc in his prime. Unbelievably we’re 15 tracks in before discovering anything like Dre’s true form. Sadly the
                    rest of the album fades into an inoffensive, insignificant lightweight exercise, where the results become all too predictable and the threats barely carry weight, epitomised by the tiresome ‘Housewife’ (‘Pass it to Snoop/Or pass it to Nate/Hoes eat dick /Like eggs and steak’). By the time ‘The Message’ preaches its conclusion, the pace and motivation have been reduced to a jaywalking dawdle in a more R & B-flavoured commercial mess that borders on total claptrap. There is no doubt that the Doc certainly needs a taste of someone else’s medicine, because OD’ing on his original hip hop blueprint won’t do him or any of his followers any good at all. ‘2001’ is certainly not the odyssey that everyone was expecting. It should be inconceivable that someone with as many production credits as Andre Young should knock out something even as half as bad as this, but the stark reality is that this legend simply hasn’t moved on with the times – and that is the greatest crime of all. For all his attitude and artistry, Dre displays supreme lackadaisicalness in a showcase unlikely to provoke anything other than a big thumbs down. Chronic ? Comprehensively appropriate…

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                      07.07.2001 05:49
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                      Eversince The first Chronic Dr.Dre has hits the streets worldwide with the phattest beats around! If its big in the world of hip-hop, Dr.Dre has something to do with it! His big input to the most successfull hip - hop band ever (NWA) was the centrepoint of his carrer, I don't know if I'm alone but after his last album I thought he'd done it all and he couldn't top it. But little faith I had as he did top it. Chronic 2001 is one of the biggest hip-hop Cd's in todays hip-hop society. the album from start to finish is loaded with great tracks. Here are a few of my favourites; - Still Dre - whats the difference between me 'n' u - forgot about Dre - Housewife In all these songs and more are collaborations with the best of th rest such as Snoop dogg, Eminem, Xzibit, Kurupt, Nate dogg and many more To conclude It's one of Dre's best and its a great contribution To hip-hop's community. I recommend it so if your a fan.... BUY IT!

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                        29.06.2001 23:58
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                        Rap! Music or Poetry? By Steven Hill Rap has been claimed to be an art form and also has been claimed to be pure filth. However is it not just poems that are recited on top of a catchy backing track, I mean what's the difference between Dr.Dre and Robert Burns they both express their views of society and tell stories of their lives. So why oh why does Robert Burns get the recognition as an amazing talented historical figure and Dr.Dre is seen and portrayed in the media as a thug? I mean what they got up to in their private lives does not influence if they are talented or not. Is it maybe then because if your dead you receive a lot more positive comments? Maybe so I mean look at Tupac a drug dealing, Murdering thug in his past time but is portrayed as an american Icon. It all seems rather suspicious that when you die, people that would have nothing good to say about you when you were alive have so much praise for you after your gone. Dre.Dre makes his comeback record Chronic 2001 and boy does he know how to come back with a bang, or should that be bang bang! With such artists on his record as Natt Dogg Snoop Dogg Xzibit, eminem and even Mary J Blige, you can't really ask is there any talent on the record. Dr.Dre will over the coming years be more recognised for his producing skills and the fact nobody makes a beat like him, rather than his rapping, although he proves the doc's still got what it takes to pull off a good verse of lyrics. His re-uniting with Snoop is perfectly timed in a rap market that is desperate from some real quality Gangsta-rap and don't get me wrong this isn't just thugs taking about killing people, oh-no their above that now everybody knows you don't mess or you will be punished, but they actually have some good messages, for instance the last track on the song is Dre's song with Mary j Blige about Easy E and how he's dead and how Dre feels about one of his closest friends being
                        gone! The albumn is crammed full of talent some tasty intro's and a very good selection of backing tracks that will be sampled forever! I personally think that rap music is a talent which only a few do well and the majority sound really bad. This though is what i thought my opinion was until I heard that my little brother listened to Limp Bizkit I mean he's 6 years old and does not need to listen to people talking about 'ripping someone's head off' and I thought I was quite liberal and relaxed about kids listening to rap or Nu-metal. I think that kids should have some sort of education about the difference between reality and some idiot talking about things he?d never do (personally I hate Fred Durst!) Before they are allowed to listen to any kind of music. I mean it sounds cool to be a gangsta in the 'hood' but if you had to make a living off selling drugs I'm sure reality is that you'd be pretty unhappy. Maybe we should educate kids rather than use censorship on everything that happens to be a little controversial.

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                          29.06.2001 17:52
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                          If you liked The Chronic, indeed if you like gangsta rap of any kind, you should buy this album. As with a lot of hip-hop sequel albums, this does resemble the first as if it is a continuation of an ongoing story. I particularly enjoyed this album because new rap star Eminem features heavily, and I really think he brings something to Dre's music. As the album may offend women and children, I would recommend it for males aged 16 to 22. My personal favourite track is "What's the Difference", which features Eminem and Xzibit.

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                            23.06.2001 21:44
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                            As soon as I got this CD, I knew it was going to be good. The Front with its simple cover, lets you know that Dre is easily the most knowledgable Hip Hop artist there is. With a massive 22 tracks, you get your money's worth by far. With a mix of hardcore rap, funny interludes and chillin hip hop, dre can deliver what is expected. I'll take you through some of the best songs on the album, to give you the real feel: 2. The Watcher, the only track featuring only Dre, is a track which shows Dre's top lyrical skills, no where else can you find such meaningful lyrics put to a great beat. 4. Still Dre, feat Snoop Dogg, gives a great beat, with a great combination of Snoop and Dre rap. 6. XXplosive, is a totally differet feel to the album, with a great catchy chorus, good song to chill to 7. What's The Difference, a great combination of different rap styles, with DRE's down to earth rap, Xzibit working well with Dre, and then the infamous Eminem showing off his amazing lyric content 10. Forgot About dre, Perhaps the best track on the album, Dre working well with Eminem, with perhaps the best lyrics in the whole album, and fast well rapped chorus by Eminem. "Now days everbody wanna talk like the got sommit to say but nothing comes out when they move their lips just a bunch of jibberish and mother**** is that they forgot about dre" 11. The Next Episode, a good contender for the best track on album, not only with great lyrics, but really catchy parts. 21. Bang Bang, a great track, totally different from the rest, with a great chant of "BANG BANG, BANG BANG", with Knoc-turn'al working really well in it I've been a Dre fan for years, and I can say this is probably the best album he has ever been involved with (though Eminem's albums are also brilliant), I suggest that all hip hop fans out their own a copy of this g
                            reat CD

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