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Led Zeppelin III - Led Zeppelin

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Genre: Rock - Classic Rock / Artist: Led Zeppelin / Original recording remastered / Audio CD released 1997-08-25 at Warner

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      28.02.2011 20:40
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      A different facet of Led Zeppelin

      If your familiarity with Led Zeppelin extends to 'Black Dog' and 'Whole Lotta Love', then you'll reach a point in this album that makes you turn to your hi-fi and go "huh? Is that REALLY Led Zeppelin?!" And whilst Rolling Stone lambasted this album at the time for not being 'consistent' with their previous output, Led Zeppelin III is quite refreshingly different.

      Predominantly written at Bron-yr-Aur, a remote cottage situated in the idyllic mountains of rural Wales, the band's respite in the country provided them and their collective Muse with much needed rest and insipiration. After an insanely hectic touring schedule, such an idea was comparitively sane. Acoustic guitars and mandolins in hand, the sessions showcased their ability to produce quite lovely folky-acoustic pieces, as well as the familiar balls-out heavy rock, different flavours of blues, and a bit of world music thrown in for good measure. It's an eclectic mix, and its status as their 'acoustic' album is actually woefully far from accurate.

      Side one is more or less all electric, opening with the Viking Invasion metal-saga 'The Immigrant Song', which quite neatly conjures up images of bearded marauders arriving on longboats, with Robert Plant's vocals hitting stratospheric siren levels. Its pounding riff and thunderous drums, as well as its references to Valhalla, serve as foundations for the genre of 'Viking Metal'. Bet they never guessed that would blossom from these sessions. 'Friends' is an Indian-tinged folk-raga, with minor keys spiced up with foreign modes. It segues into 'Celebratin Day', which is quite a camp bit of slide-guitar led rock and roll.

      The real jewel here is 'Since I've Been Loving You'; a slow-burning, aching blues number that became a live staple. It's possibly the rawest sounding thing they've ever laid down on record too; the solo was winged in one take. The story goes that Jimmy Page just walked into the studio, plugged his guitar in and just let it fly out of his fingers, with no effects, pedals, re-takes or any kind of treatment. It shows too .This is the sound not of someone playing guitar, but being a guitarist; Page had the rare gift of his fingers being linked directly to his imagination, and whatever he dreamt up came out via his instrument. It's a superb piece, with the whole band behind him, and Robert Plant acting his foil again, duelling vocals and guitar cutting and thrusting. Lester Bangs called it 'lethally dull', I don't think he was listening very closely.

      It's sadly followed by one of the dumbest songs they ever cut. 'Out on the Tiles' is a lazy bit of composition, with a riff that lacks any of the immediate 'wow' of any cooked up on the previous record. However, things get better on the acoustic half of the album. 'Gallow's Pole' is Zeppelin's take on a traditional, macabre folk song, where a poor soul is bargaining for his life with a hangman. Offering his sister up as 'company' for the executioner, the hangman loses patience after having his wasy with her, and hangs her instead. It's a bit grim, but is a fine example of story through song. It's a frenetic performance, acoustic lines battling away in the background akin to 'Duellin' Banjoes'.

      'Tangerine' is a very pretty piece, short and sweet just like its namesake fruit. A leftover from Jimmy Page's days in the Yardbirds, it's a touching piece that sits nicely by 'That's The Way', another story-song about two childhood friends separated by racial segregation. They fit in well with compositions like 'Thank You' and 'Ten Years Gone', again highlighting their tendency to shift from dark to light, heavy to soft, power to calm.

      'Bron-yr-Aur Stomp' is just that; a stomping bar-room knees up. It's an ode to Robert Plant's dog Strider, named after the character from Lord of the Rings. Given the setting in which they were writing and the copious amounts of cider available, it's perfect for a scrumpy-fuelled barn dance, Bonham pounding his drums like a madman. The closing track 'Hats off to (Roy) Harper' is the weirdest song here. Distorted vocals and distorted slide guitar sweat through this bizarre bit of psychedelic swamp-blues folk stuff; one wonders what the hell they were on when they cooked this one up...

      While most of the tracks on here aren't as memorable as their massive, epic sounding signature anthems like 'Kashmir' or 'Dazed and Confused', this album shows the very admirable trait to embrace experimentation and diversity. Electric blues, folk pieces, Indian tinges, heavy metal; this is a diversely influenced record with much for the listener to discover. They could have rested on their laurels and stuck to riff-based blues rock, but that would have been lazy. This is a band with the guts to take chances, and it mostly pays off. An overlooked gem that adds colour to the Led Zeppelin palette.

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      10.08.2008 03:12
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      Now if Led Zeppelin 2 and Led Zeppelin 4 are the best albums the band produced where does that leave Led Zeppelin 3? In my view it is still a pretty good album but some of the tracks just did not come off. When the band reconvened for the 4th album it was back to basics and back to doing what they did best.

      The album begins with The Immigrant Song and this is an excellent album opener. I remember this getting a lot of radio airplay despite Led Zeps insistence on never releasing singles. Frenetic in pace and evoking lyrical references to Norse mythology it drives along on a Page guitar riff and staccato drum line. The defining part though is Robert Plants vocals which strain above the backing. Friends follows and after the pace of The Immigrant Song this uses soothing acoustic guitar with John Paul Jones experimenting with the mellotron behind and a bobbling percussion sound. I think though this is one of the tracks which is not quite there, I think something is missing.
      Celebration Day too is a track that is very nearly excellent but just misses out in the final production. A good enough start but it sounds a little tinny. In the early days I spent ages trying to adjust my stereo system to get this track to sound deep but without success. Plants really tries on the vocals but it sounds too forced and Page even seems to be trying too hard. Eventually the track just seems to lose its way and ends. It's a pity because there are elemnts of the song which could have been developed. In so many ways then Since I've Been Loving You is a complete contrast. A stunning blues song delivered with impeccable vocals and with Pages guitar giving out more emotional support that you should expect from a stringed piece of wood. Jones organ behind adds to the melancholy feel and for good measure John Bonham holds it all together on drums. I could not suggest any ways this song could be improved.


      Out On The Tiles is another track though that should have remained in the studio. This was smply not worthy of being on a Led Zeppelin album. It would not be the first time that such a poor track appeared and its not the only one on this album. Sadly when they got to Houses Of The Holy they released an album full of them Gallows Pole is a traditional song arranged by Page and Plant. Zeppelin did like to experiment and on the whole this is not too bad. However this is not what true fans wanted from Zeppelin. Tracks of varying musical kinds yes, tracks of varying musical quality no.
      So thank heavens for Tangerine a neat catchy song on album with, heaven help us, a chorus. I'll say that again a Zeppelin song with a chorus. A nice acoustic song which would not disgrace an unplugged session until Page throws in a distorted electric solo. That's The Way follows and the band are still in acoustic territory. It is almost as though Page and Plant were trying to bury the Led Zeppelin image that had been created as so many tracks on this album were more studied than on the previous 2 albums. The feeling is reinforced with the final 2 tracks Bron-Y-Aur Stomp and Hats Off To Harper. Where the stomp sounds like they were recording a singsong in a Welsh cottage the ode to Roy Harper sounds like a nightmare.

      I do still think of this as a good album however when compared with some of their other albums and tracks they released there are few favourite tracks here. If you were selecting a Best Of Led Zeppelin album and had 20 tracks to chose from Immigrant Song and Since I've Been Loving You would get in but probably nothing else from this album. A final word for the sleeve though which featured a montage of images with a revolving insert you could turn. I spent many a happy hour playing with that.

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      25.06.2005 21:55
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      Sorry peeps, I love Zepp but I don't like this one too much. After the bombast of LZII, the boys retreated to Wales to get in touch with their artistic side, with the result of this, a mish-mash of a record that is half diamond-true rock and half hippie-dippie rubbish. Read on!!

      The original album came in gatefold sleeve with a turning dial that depicted the changing of the seasons, very rustic, and inside had such things as the Montgolfier balloon, a wasp on a Zeppelin, an RAF WW1 biplane, a butterfly and for some reason a stick of corn on the cob. Remains one of rocks great sleeves. Curses to CDs!!

      Immigrant Song opens things up, this feeling like a left over from LZII..."we come from the land of ice and snow, from the midnight sun where the hot springs blow...." aah ahh aaah aah indeed, love it, acoustic guitars kick open Friends, a nice studio song the band rarely did live, which has a lovely swirling coda leading straight into the balls-out rock and roll of Celebration Day...."ma ma ma I'm so happy, I'm gonna join the band!!" Get that bottle out now and dance in the street. Zepp slow it down for the big blues number Since I've Been Loving You, a theme that was repeated on albums right through their career. A stately key and chord change and all is well on Planet Zepp. More out and out rock in the simple but great Out On The Tiles.

      HOWEVER...side two is the quieter acoustic one. Anyone who suffers from insomnia should buy this album just to hear this as it will send you to sleep no problem. The trad Gallows Pole starts things off, this is a good song but surely does not belong on here (if anything it would be better on Physical Graffitti I reckon), the quiet introspective Tangerine (a relic from the Yardbirds days) has Jimmy Page reciting a muted six string, before the environmentally sound but dull Thats The Way sees Zepp getting hip to the Green trip. The ridiculous Bryn-Yr-Ar-Stomp, seemingly a drunken skit about a pet dog, keeps the insensia going before the album limps to a close with Hats Off To Roy Harper, Zepp's tribute to the English folkie and mate of Jimmy Page.

      An excellent side one, a poor side two, result one band in identity crisis. Their brilliance would show with the next three albums. I suppose you have to try things out to get better, and not many of these songs are remembered when the name of Zepp is mentioned these days. Still, worth a listen. Do you really need the line up? Plant - Page - Jones - Bonham. Originally released on Atlantic in 1970, easily picked up online, but sadly less that great cover.

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        27.10.2002 02:48
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        Following much speculation in the comment section I have decided to write an op on the greatest band to grace the earth: Led Zeppelin. ...who thinks this is Zep's best? Thank goodness, I've always thought there was something wrong with me - whenever people have the old "is Led Zep IV or Physical Graffiti their best album" discussion, I've mumbled "what about Led Zep III" under my breath. I bought this album in the week of it's original release, back in the early 70s, and loved it from the opening bludgeoning banshee wail of Immigrant Song onwards on first listen. What happy memories... This was the album when Zep really unveiled what they were all about. The previous two albums had been wonderful enough, but the songs were drawn from a fairly narrow range. On this album, we had the hard rockers (Immigrant Song) and blues homage (Since I've Been Loving You) which we'd grown to expect, but the band also unveiled their more whymsical side - Gallows Pole, That's The Way, Bron Y Aur stomp, proving that they knew a thing or two about tunes as well. Stand-out tracks - Immigrant Song (a candidate for the best opening 10 seconds of an album) and Since I've Been Loving You, on which Jimmy Page's guitar playing reached it's absolute zenith. If you want to know what bands like The Music and Hundred Reasons have been listening to, go out and buy this. Go on go on go on go on... Following the huge success that led zep reaped from their previous two masterpieces, the public and critics were expecting great things from this the third in the series. They were not dissapointed, and this was reflected in this albums sales as it stormed to number one in both America and the UK. The effortless in which the band could control both industries in Britain and over the Antlantic is mind boggling and shows the true depth in British music at the time. People never t
        ought that the beatles would ever be matched but Led Zep ran them close. In my personal opinion, the front two of Page and Plant have easily outshone Lennon and McCartney- both in the lyrics department and the instrument department. This album is highly underated and is nothing short of a true classic. As with most Zeppelin albums it has everything- starting off with a real thumper 'immigration song' with Plant screaming about the Vikings invasion, through to the blues master piece 'since i've been lovin you' the way in which Page plays the guitar in such an effortless fashion is unbelievable. 'Gallows pole' again touches the other sides of Zeppelins talents with a banjo style riff that complements PLants lyrics to perfection. 'Tangerine' is one of my favourite Zeppelin songs and never ceases to amaze me every time i play it- it always makes me happy. It is also one of the most under rated zeppelin songs. Through this album Page and Plant releive the listener of the raw edge to their playing and delve into untouched more melodic acoustic ventures. Whats more is they do this superbly well. A must buy for real Zeppelin fans. Ok, so it's different from the previous two, but in my mind, Zeppelin III was the product of the band spreading their musical wings and proving they could do more than just rock. Bron-Y-Aur stomp is awesome and Since I've Been Loving You is their best attempt at pure blues. Perhaps not so consistent as Zeppelin II, but then again what is. Forget the critics, this is a must.

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          17.01.2002 02:30
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          We come from the land of the ice and snow In England the band had a few weeks off before they had to record their third album, which Atlantic wanted to release that autumn, with Led Zeppelin II (fans called it the “Brown Bomber” because of its sepia jacket) still high on the charts. Some songs the band had already worked out, “Immigrant Song” reflected Robert’s fascination with Celtic Britain and the tides of English history, especially the four-hundred-year period from the eighth to eleventh centuries when the English fought for their island with generations of Viking invaders from Denmark to Sweden. “Immigrant Song”, with its images of barbarous Norse seamen and pillaged abbeys, was the odies, and the band was considering opening the shows with it on the next tour. Late in April, meanwhile, Jimmy made a rare television appearance by himself, playing “White Summer” and “Black Mountain Side” on the BBC Two program hosted by Julie Felix. Led Zeppelin was now burned out from fifteen months of continuous work, most of it on the road in America. Bonzo and Jones went home to their families, but Jimmy and Robert had to write and album. Originally, since their personal tastes were running to Crosby, Stills, Nash and Joni Mitchell, and since they wrote well together on the road, they considered getting a house in northern California and writing there, but they wanted to be close to their own families, so Robert suggested they retreat to Wales to a remote rural cottage in the mountainous wilds of Snowdonia called Bron-Yr-Aur, which Robert had visited as a child. The fashion in those days was for young hippies to retreat from the evils of city life and get back to the land, living communally on old farms, returning to “the basics”. Jimmy had never been to Wales and thought the quiet, mysterious Welsh countryside would be good for him after the gruesome rigours of touring. Robert took along Maureen and the baby, and Jimmy brought his Charlotte. Three of the roadie, Clive Coulson, Henry Smith and Sandy MacGregor, went along to look after things. Bron-Yr-Aur, the name meant “Golden Beast” in Welsh, lay in a black mountain vale far off the road near the river Dovey. With guitar cases clattering in back, the entourage had to drive across the fields in jeeps to reach the house, which had no electricity. The trip was originally planned not so much to write songs, but to rest. It was springtime and Wales was in flower. They spent long hours walking the countryside, carrying tape recorders. They drove around in their Jeep and visited a nearby estate and mansion that was being restored by a gang of young volunteers. One of the kids seemed to recognise them and handed Jimmy a guitar, but he protested demurely that he had no idea how to play. Another time their solitude was broken by a group of kids on motorbikes. This enraged Robert who ordered his minions to go and cause mayhem but it was actually some farmer’ sons who had fishing and shooting rights so he was sh@t on from a great height. One of them gasped, “Are you really Plant?” The fact that they actually have television or radio in Wales amazes me! Evenings were spent before the fire, drinking cider heated with hot pokers from the heath. Empty cassette player batteries were laid on the fire to warm and recharge. After outings in the Welsh air, the musicians were exhausted but inspired. Gradually the songs of Led Zeppelin III began to take shape, mostly folk style, acoustic and bucolic, vastly different in tone from the mechanized crunch and road frenzy of the Brown Bomber. For once Led Zeppelin was not in motion. Later Robert summed up the Bron-Yr-Aur idyll to an interviewer. “It was time to step back, take stock and not to get lost in it all. Zeppelin was starting to get very big and we wanted the rest of our journey to
          take a very even course. Hence the trip into the mountains and the beginning of the ethereal Page and Plant. I thought we’d be able to get a little peace and quiet and get your actual Californian, Marin Country blues, which we managed to do in Wales rather than in San Francisco. It was a great place.” By may 19 Led Zeppelin was ensconsed in an old Hampshire country house called Headley garage, recording Led Zeppelin III with a mobile recording studio, away from the distractions of London. Band, management, and crew simply set up housekeeping and got to work, with Jimmy Producing. Some tunes like “The Immigrant Song” already existed. They had another track, a blues called “Poor Tom” recorded early in May in the Olympic Studios in London. Other songs – “That’s the way,” “Down by the Seaside,” “Bron-Yr-Aur Stomp” – were brought along from Wales. The Headley Garage sessions produced a mixed litter of hard Zeppelin rock bombs and wooden, acoustic numbers influenced by the prevalent California soft rock of the day. The hard numbers were as relentless (and more meaningful than) the battle cries of the Brown Bomber. “The Immigrant Song” cast the band in the role of Viking invaders raping, burning, pillaging, and whispering tales of glory. Robert’s wails became war cries; his moans were the north wind wailing through ruined Merican monasteries. Obviously intended as the successor to “Whole Lotta Love,” Robert goes for the gut: “Val-hal-la I am coming.” The song was hard to take seriously because its premise was so stupid, but Zeppelin fans adored it (but the critics hated it, “We come from the land of ice and snow!?!?! Who do they think they are to be so Pompous.”); the song set the tone of overwrought Dark Ages fantasy – a cross between an antiquarian edition of Beowulf and a stack of mint Marv
          els – that would be the standard psychic backdrop for all the heavy metal bands to come. It was followed by “Friends,” a shameless rip off of both Crosby, Stills and Nash (in the chordal acoustic strumming) and Tony Visonti’s string arrangements for T-Rex, the big English band of 1970. With its morbid orchestration and chanting, it was Jimmy’s last stab at psychedelia, and it wound down to a drone that introduced “Celebration Day,” another din-of-battle number with lots of guitar and overdubs and The Living Loving Maid showing up in the second verse. The drone that began it was cosmetic rather than atmospheric. The original beginning was accidentally erased by an assistant engineer, who actually fled the studio in fear for his life when he realised his terrible mistake. “Since I’ve been Loving You,” Jimmy and Robert’s majestic blues was recorded “live” in the studio and approximates the band’s concert sound of the day. Jimmy’s lines are pretty and original, and it’s obvious that Robert had been listening carefully to both Van Morrison and Janis Joplin. “Out on the Tiles” would finish the first side with all the subtlety of a tumbling blimp, a mindless, monumental blast of pure Zeppelin hot air, all tough, stomping mystique that endeared the band to a generation of young Americans tippling cheap Boone’s Farm apple wine and ready to rock. These same HARDCORE fans would fill the second, uncharacteristically quiet side of Led Zeppelin III. It was as if Led Zeppelin was embarrassed by the truly stupefying success of “Whole Lotta Love” and repelled by their singular identification with this lumbering tyrannosaurus in the public mind. These musicians considered themselves artistes. They wanted to make a respectable album after the storm trooping of the first two, a record they could play for their families at home, the way
          the members of Led Zeppelin listened to Fairport Convention or Joni Mitchell. The second side starts with “Gallows Pole,” an ancient and grim ballad Jimmy had found on an old Folkways album by Fred Gerlach, one of the first white musicians to play the twelve-string guitar as a folk instrument. It’s played very “down home,” with a fiddle and Jimmy’s banjo. “My finger picking,” Jimmy later told an interviewer, “was a cross between Pete Seeger, Earl Scruggs and total incompetence.” The imagery of the song recalls the hanged man of the tarot, in which Jimmy (like Crowley, who had designed his own deck) was interested. (The divinatory meaning of the Hanged Man indicates changing circumstances and the seeking of wisdom and guidance from the unconscious.) This was followed by “Tangerine,” which descended from the Yardbirds. Jimmy had written in a period of emotional turmoil and the Yardbirds tried and failed to get it right! Now it was rebuilt with new lyrics, a pedal steel guitar, and an eloquent solo that seemed to quote Jeff Beck. “That’s the Way,” which followed , had a lovely, echoing guitar patterned on the moody, evocative records that Neil Young was making. The lyrics dealt with ecology, dirty water and an oblique commentary on their bad times in the States, where they had been threatened with arrest if they played another encore, where they had been accused of perversion and drug addiction by southern sheriffs, where they had looked down the barrels of guns in their dressing rooms. The mood was lifted by “Bron-Yr-Aur Stomp,” a roving skiffle with a tough rhythm, Bonzo playing lightly like a rhino in a tutu. Robert’s lyric was nearly was a tribute to his dog, Strider. (sounds familiar) All these tracks were nearly complete by the middle of June, along with two outtakes from the Welsh holiday, “Down by the Seaside,” a
          nd a guitar solo Jimmy called “Bron-Yr-Aur.” There was one other, still without a title: a manic, keening blues version of Bukka White’s “Shake ‘Em on Down” with out-of-control bottleneck guitar and electronically “treated” vocals that aimed for the loose, demented feeling of Robert Johnson and came close to capturing it. Later, after Led Zeppelin had met a half-mad English folksinger at the Bath Festival later that month, they would title this seering English blues track in homage to him: “Hats off to (Roy) Harper.” Later Jimmy would be quoted: “As far as I’m concerned, hats off to anybody who does what they think is right and refuses to sell out.” And that about sums up LED ZEPPELIN III

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            19.02.2001 00:07
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            Led Zeppelin III, released in 1970, is an important album in the Led Zeppelin catalogue, because (1) with one exception, it was the first step in the band's departure from the blues style that influenced them so much, and (2) Jimmy Page's acoustic guitar became more prominent in their work. The songs on the album, and a brief description of each, follows. 1. The Immigrant Song--This is a song driven by the bass and drums, and it features some tremendous high range vocals by Robert Plant. Lyrically, the song demonstrates the band's infatuation with mythology, and in this particular song, it's Norse mythology ("Tell Valhalla I am coming"). This is an excellent album opener. 2. Friends--Multiple acoustic guitars are featured in this song, along with some interesting percussion. Robert Plant delivers yet another strong vocal performance, and a mellotron provides an interesting melody to accentuate the acoustic guitars. The absence of a bass guitar and drums make this song all the more interesting. 3. Celebration Day--A somewhat frenetic electric guitar opens this song, and it takes a while for the beat to land. Until it does, the listener experiences a sense of disorientation. Robert Plant really sings on this one, and Jimmy Page knocks off a good, dry electric guitar solo. Throughout the song, the electric guitar continues in its somewhat manic, frantic rhythm, and instead of stopping, it fades out. 4. Since I've Been Loving You--Simply one of the greatest blues songs I've ever heard, bar none. Jimmy Page's guitar solos are intensely moving and the organ played by John Paul Jones add to the blues effect. Robert Plant sings the blues as well as any blue-eyed guy I've ever heard. As the song progresses, it builds to a crescendo, and climaxes with the greatest guitar solo I've ever heard. Page gets sounds out of his guitar that aren't ripped off from traditional blues playe
            rs; they're 100% his. The whole band re-enters, stops, then builds again to the end. The song does not so much finish; it runs out of steam, almost as if the players were exhausted from the effort. This is the last true blues song this band would ever do. 5. Out On The Tiles--The syncopated riffs of the guitar and bass, complimented by John Bonham's drums, set this song up. The effect of the lyrics would almost make this a pop song if it wasn't for the complicated riffs that move this tune. Robert Plant was the perfect guy to front this band, and he shows us why in this song. 6. Gallows Pole--This is an old traditional English song which was arranged by Jimmy Page and Robert Plant. A subdued acoustic guitar starts this one, and Robert Plant enters with his vocals. The acoustic guitar becomes more dominant deeper into the song, and the bass and drums contribute to make this a driving number, albeit with an acoustic flavor. The banjo which enters midway through the song gives it a more rustic effect. 7. Tangerine--This is probably the most commercial-sounding song on album, although they probably didn't mean for it to have that effect. A little snippet of acoustic guitar starts, then stops, then Jimmy Page's acoustic twelve-string guitar takes over. This is really a pretty tune and Page's electric guitar solo, with a lot of reverb and other effects, is spectacular. 8. That's The Way--One of my all-time favorite Led Zeppelin songs. This one again features Jimmy Page and his acoustic guitar, probably tuned to an open G. Robert Plant sounds somehow reflective in singing this song. I think there is a pedal steel in the background laying down some pretty nice licks. Again, no bass and drums, and not much percussion, give this song an simple, rustic effect. 9. Bron-Y-Aur Stomp--I think the title to this song is a village in Wales or somewhere where this band went to write, rehearse and relax. Jimm
            y Page is again upfront with his acoustic guitar and the intro that he plays is nothing short of incredible. Even though this song was written by the members of the band, it has the feel of a traditional song, like Gallows Pole. Vocal harmonies are rare in a Led Zeppelin song, but it happens here, and works well. 10. Hats Off To Roy Harper--This is another English traditional song, and it's arranged here by Charles Obscure, whoever he is. The beginning of the song is rather confusing, with another frantic acoustic guitar moving alongside some rather slurred vocals by Robert Plant. Jimmy Page brings out his finger slide and really shows off his slide guitar style. No drums or bass are in this tune, just Page and Plant. This is a good album; in fact it's one of my favorite Led Zeppelin albums. It provides us with a close look at a band which is experimenting with different musical styles. With this album, Led Zeppelin all but scrapped the blues and began to explore acoustic styles. The album is worth buy just to examine this transition.

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            05.10.2000 04:38

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            On this album ,Zeppelin begin to become more electic in their music after two raunchy blues albums to get the ball rolling. They haven't completely left their power behind though. IMMIGRANT SONG is a short but immensley powerful song with plants banshee wail like nothing you've ever heard. CELEBRATION DAY has a brlliant warped slide guitar riff and OUT ON THE TILES is an underrated classic zeppelin tune with its funky swagger. SINCE I'VE BEEN LOVING YOU is a brilliant epic not quite of the same standard as other zeppelin epics but it still remains a concert favourite. But the secret of this album is the folky side of it which is excellent throughout. GALLOWS POLE is a menacing interpretation of a Leadbelly classic, BRON-YUAR-STOMP is an infectious tune, but the standouts ore most definately TANGERINE which is a quite amazing tune showing how much Zeppelin have matured as can be said for THAT'S THE WAY which is equally pristine and one of their best compositions. What this album does is show you that Led Zeppelin were far more than straight blues rock or heavy metal, their compositions were detailed thoughtful and even sensitive and of all their albums, this shows that side of them best and also gives us a little sneak preview of what was to come next.

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            06.07.2000 04:38

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            I was just listening to "That's The Way" and oh my God. that is the most beautiful song i have ever heard in my entire lifetime. Not only is it beautifully written, but the notes, the music from it is the best in the world. Let me give you a little taste of the lyrics. "And yesterday I saw you standing by the river/ And weren't those tears that filled your eyes/ And all the fish that lay in dirty water dying/ Had they got you hypnotized/ And yesterday I saw you kissing tiny flowers/ But all that lives is born to die/ And so I say to you that nothing really matters/ And all you do is stand and cry/" Oh my God. I know guys aren't supposed to cry, but every time i listen to this song, i can't help myself. When you read it, it might not sound very appealing, and if you've heard it, you'd understand. Oh and the album not only has this wonderfully written and wonderfully produced song, but it has many other great songs including, "Immigrant Song, Since I've Been Loving You, GALLOWS POLE, Tangerine, Bron-Y-Aur Stomp, and Hats Off To (Roy) Harper." Great songs folks. If you've never heard The Immigrant Song, you don't know what you're missing. Led Zeppelin was the doorway to all the popular heavy metal groups of today. Because of these people, now people like "Prodigy, Rob Zombie, RAGE AGAINST THE MACHINE, Marilyn Manson, and Slipknot." If it wern't for Led Zeppelin, these bands would be complete outcasts. Thank God For Led Zeppelin.

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        • Product Details

          Disc #1 Tracklisting
          1 Immigrant song
          2 Friends
          3 Celebration day
          4 Since I've been loving you
          5 Out on the tiles
          6 Gallows pole
          7 Tangerine
          8 That's the way
          9 Bron Y Aur stomp
          10 Hats off to (Roy) Harpe