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Necroticism - Descanting The Insalubrious - Carcass

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Genre: Hard Rock & Metal - Heavy Metal / Artist: Carcass / Enhanced / Audio CD released 2004-07-06 at Earache

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    2 Reviews
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    • More +
      14.04.2012 11:17
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      A very good album, probably Carcass' best work.

      DISCLAIMER: Please be aware, the following review may not be suitable for people of a young age or who are squeamish. The subject matter on this album is of a very controversial nature.

      "Necroticism - Descanting the Insalubrious" is the 3rd studio album by British death metal band, Carcass. It was released in 1991 on Earache Records and produced by Colin Richardson. The line-up for the album was Jeff Walker (vocals/bass), Bill Steer (guitar), Michael Amott (guitar) and Ken Owen (drums).

      Following up 1989's "Symphonies of Sickness", Carcass decided it was time for a change with "Necroticism - Descanting the Insalubrious". The album is less grindcore and heading more into the realms of death metal than anything, as the band became a four piece with the addition of Michael Amott. It is interesting to note that the band elected to add spoken word at the beginning of songs, which add to the gore factor of autopsies.

      "Inpropagation" spoken word intro: "A body is committed to a public mortuary. Any victim of sudden or unexpected death will be brought here for a post-mortem by a pathologist; their job is to establish the cause of death. But sometimes a body is unrecognizable. Then it is vital, especially if murder is suspected, to establish identity."

      The song begins on all the right notes, and it's clear that Colin Richardson's production has altered Carcass' sound, as has the welcome addition of a second guitarist in future Arch Enemy stalwart, Michael Amott. What does remain is the band's ability to make records out of the macabre, in this instance making fertilizer out of dead bodies. This is one of the best songs on the album.

      "Corporal Jigsore Quandary" spoken word intro: "Identifying the bodies which are decomposed, dismembered, skeletonised pose very serious problems. We've had many cases in this department where a body has been found in pieces, or decomposed, and we've been able to put things together. Yes, the head, the upper part of the body, in a very badly decomposed state."

      This track starts with Ken Owen's wonderfully sounding double bass before the twin attack of Steer and Amott kicks in. The guitar riff in particular is one of the main highlights of the album, and the first solo by Steer is a joy to hear. The track is about piecing a corpse back together to identify the person.

      "Symposium of Sickness" spoken word intro: "That's why I find it so amusing that the latter-day saints of our business; one, attribute to me motives that just weren't there, and two, accuse me of corrupting morality, which I wish I had the power to do. Prepare to die."

      The song begins in the old Carcass style, with grinding guitars leading into the dark-pitched lead vocals, sharing some lines with the backing vocals of Steer and Amott. The lyrics suggest the song is about drinking the blood of a cadaver at a ritualistic party. It's probably the weakest song on the album, and largely goes by unnoticed, except for the ending guitar riff and solo which bring the song back to life a little.

      "Pedigree Butchery" spoken word intro: "Oh my God! What are these? You can hear people puking. They're dog meat!"

      This is one of the best songs on the album, and the tightness of the playing is evident throughout. The highlight being the riff leading into the chorus, and Ken Owen's full use of his drum kit is a joy to hear. The track is pure death metal joy, and the lyrics are quite shocking. The song is about grinding infant bodies for dog food.

      "Incarnated Solvent Abuse" spoken word intro: "If visible identification is not possible, the pathologist may be able to take fingerprints from the body until decay sets in, things become more complicated."

      This is the best song on the album, this one, as many Carcass fans will agree. In fact, it's probably the best song Carcass has ever put out. The track is about turning a man into glue then sniffing the fumes, which is nice... if you like that sort of thing. I, however, am merely interested in the music, and the sounds which come out of this song are wondrous.

      "Carneous Cacoffiny" spoken word intro: "Human remains in a beaker and tray and coffee pot. Bones which were being partly macerated, dissolved, in a margarine container which had engine coolant in it. It smelled very awful."

      The slowest song on the album, "Carneous Cacoffiny" is about making musical instruments out of human body parts. The track grinds along at a slow tempo, and only gets going in the last third section, when Bill Steer hammers out a solo of epic proportions. It's not a shredding solo, but more of a laborious, "I know what I'm doing" type of thing. It's not the best song on the album, but it's not the worst.

      "Lavaging Expectorate of Lysergide Composition" has no spoken word intro, and is a song about concocting some sort of drug and dying from its use. It is a complete change from what we've been used to on the album so far, but that doesn't stop the very heavy musical aspects of the track. Steer and Amott once again show that Carcass as a four piece works better than a three piece.

      "Forensic Clinicism / The Sanguine Article" has no spoken word intro. It is a very good song to end the album on, with lyrics about a surgeon who mutilates people while they're still alive, and makes me wonder if "Hostel" writer and director, Eli Roth, is a Carcass fan. It's probably the heaviest track on the album, packed with killer riffs and sublime drumming.

      In summary, this is probably the definitive Carcass album, although it's a completely different change in genre from their previous two albums, but shows that the band can evolve. Musically, it's a special blend of brilliance, and the production is some of the best I've heard on any album. Lyrically, it's a bit of a shocker for some, but I can overlook that because of the way the songs sound. The album is heartily recommended by me.

      1. Inpropagation
      2. Corporal Jigsore Quandary
      3. Symposium of Sickness
      4. Pedigree Butchery
      5. Incarnated Solvent Abuse
      6. Carneous Cacoffiny
      7. Lavaging Expectorate of Lysergide Composition
      8. Forensic Clinicism / The Sanguine Article

      My rating: 9/10

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    • More +
      12.04.2008 22:05
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      Carcass' third album (1991).

      With a constantly evolving band like Carcass, fans will always have differing views on which period was the band's peak, specifically the frenetic gore-grind of their early days or the more contemplative and melodic death metal of their twilight phase, but most tend to agree that the band's third album is a successful meeting between the two styles, and also their finest.

      'Necroticism' retains the extreme heaviness and surgical subject matter of the previous two albums, but the introduction of second guitarist Michael Amott (later of Arch Enemy) starts to take the band's music in a melodic direction that was only hinted at in brief passages of 'Symphonies of Sickness.' The balance between heaviness and melody has rarely been so perfectly executed, the only competitors being the early releases of Swedish melodic death metal giants Dark Tranquillity and In Flames, without it being allowed to take over in the way it would on later releases.

      Colin Richardson's production job further perfects this fusion, rendering the entire performance audible for the first time at no cost to the atmosphere, and the songwriting process has become even more elaborate, with an average song length of over five minutes compared to the one and a half minute mean of the debut. These more progressive tendencies run the risk of the band alienating even more people than they naturally do already, but this final album from their classic period avoids seeming indulgent like the later ones would tend to, and is rightly recognised as one of the death metal classics.

      1. Inpropagation
      2. Corporal Jigsore Quandary
      3. Symposium of Sickness
      4. Pedigree Butchery
      5. Incarnated Solvent Abuse
      6. Carneous Cacoffiny
      7. Lavaging Expectorate of Lysergide Composition
      8. Forensic Clinicism/The Sanguine Article

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  • Product Details

    Disc #1 Tracklisting
    1 Inpropagation
    2 Corporal Jigsore Quandary
    3 Symposium Of Sickness
    4 Pedigree Butchery
    5 Incarnated Solvent Abuse
    6 Carneous Cacoffiny
    7 Lavaging Expectorate Of Lysergide Composition
    8 Forensic Clinicism/The Sanguine Article