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Out Of Time - R.E.M.

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Genre: Rock - Pop Rock / Artist: REM / Enhanced / Audio CD released 2005-02-28 at Rhino

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      09.06.2009 13:16
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      REM at their best

      From its instantly recognisable cover, you just know that this is a classic. I recall this album getting considerable play on my father's car stereo as a child and astonishingly the album doesn't seem to have dated a day.

      An amazing selection of REM songs reading like a best of the band, it's amazing that this was just a regular album. Stipe has an accessible way of delivering poetic lyrics that have emotion without sounding like a ponse, he has great intonation and delivery which helps make this a timeless classic. There's a perfect mix of fast and slow songs, great timing and excellent musicianship to create a curious concoction of pop and rock that hasn't, in my opinion been repeated since either by the band or by anyone else.

      The blend of guitars and piano playuing is outstanding as are the lyrics which are extremely thoughtful yet at the same time easily memorable. Whether it's the slow "Night Swimming" or the ubeat tune "Born in Jamaica" with slightly neurotic sounding vocals - you are bound to thoroughly enjoy this timeless masterpiece.

      1 Radio Song
      2 Losing My Religion
      3 Low
      4 Near Wild Heaven
      5 Endgame
      6 Shiny Happy People
      7 Belong
      8 Half A World Away
      9 Texarkana
      10 Country Feedback
      11 Me In Honey

      More recent versions of this have a 2nd disc that consist of numerous snippets and versions of songs from the 1st Disc. I've actually still only got this on tape - so can't comment on the newly included parts.

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        25.04.2008 00:57
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        A must for even the most casual music fan

        R.E.M. are one of the most important bands of the last quarter-century. This album proves why.

        1991's "Out of Time", their second for Warner Bros., was by far the band's most commercially successful to date. Home to megahit "Losing My Religion", it spent - literally - years in the UK Album Chart top 75 and sold over ten million copies worldwide. But as we all know, chart success is not everything - after all, it's debateable whether Britney Spears or Jennifer Lopez will go down with the greats, but they've sold millions of albums. Thankfully, however, in this case the popularity was completely justified. "Out of Time" is one of the all-time greatest albums, by any musical artist.

        A lofty claim, but the songs back it up. Things get off to a blinding start with the minor hit "Radio Song" - a song that slides from soaring ballad to rock-tinged hip-hop so effortlessly you can't quite believe your ears. "The world is collapsing around our ears / I turned up the radio but I can't hear it", Stipe begins, as a rant against the "same sing-songs" that dominate the airwaves gets underway. (Ironic, seeing as R.E.M. would be dominating those same airwaves for years to come, but hey, Stipe didn't know that!) And while guest vocalist KRS-One proves a turn-off for many, his hip-hop stylings fit in well with the generally light-hearted tone of the catchy tune. It's not the album's best track but it's memorable.

        "Losing My Religion" is the album's second track. And it really needs no introduction, does it? Surely the biggest-ever hit to utilise a mandolin, it's arguably R.E.M.'s definitive song - hook-laden folk-pop backed with stunning instrumentation; lyrically obtuse and open to a multitude of interpretations. Amazingly, it hasn't suffered from excessive re-playing on VH1 and Radio 2 - it sounds just as fresh after a hundred listens as it did after one. A genuine pop masterpiece, it's probably the album's higlight. Its four and a half minutes fly by.

        Track three, "Low" is quite the contrast with the prior cut. Very low-key and slow, with Stipe's vocals buried deeply in an already-sparse mix, it's not one you'll hear on the radio a lot but it's a thoroughly engaging listen, especially if you listen carefully enough to pick up on the flashes of subtle imagery Stipe conveys in the lyrics: "dusk is dawn is day, where did it go? .. your bright light shines bright". Somehow, despite its slow pace and five-minute running time, it doesn't even remotely drag, and compares favourably with R.E.M.'s earlier attempts at low-key "epics" ("Camera", anyone?)

        "Near Wild Heaven" is my personal favourite from the album. Sure "Losing My Religion" got the airplay and "Country Feedback" is the traditional fan favourite, but it's this irresistibly catchy jangle-pop masterpiece that catches my attention time after time. The first of the album's two tracks to feature Mike Mills on primary vocals, his lilting country-pop tones go wonderfully with jangling backing. The lyrics are uncharacteristically simple for R.E.M. (perhaps as they were penned by Mills himself) but that's no criticism; indeed, in an album of obtuse and impenetrable lyrics, it comes as quite a change. The chorus, simply comprised of repetitions of the refrain "Living inside / living inside / near wild heaven", is guaranteed to stick in your head for weeks on end. Quality through and through.

        Near-instrumental "Endgame" follows, easily R.E.M.'s best instrumental piece to date. Supposed to convey the aftermath of winning a sports match through music (hence, "Endgame"), Stipe's enchanting vocalisations ("Ba da da da da da ha ha ha") are just another instrument in this sweet, moving, sentimental piece. Few other bands could pull off a lyric-free song so well.

        The infamous "Shiny Happy People" is up next. Featuring guest vocalist Kate Pierson of fellow Athens, Georgia compadres The B52s, the band have famously disowned this song, excluding it from their "Best Of" despite it being among their biggest hits and never performing it live. It's a shame, as unavowedly ecstatic songs - as this is - do have a place in music, despite the Radiohead- and Coldplay-led drive towards melancholy of late. "Shiny, happy people holding hands / Shiny, happy people laughing", Stipe and Pierson cheerfully sing in the chorus. (There is a widespread claim that the song is about being on anti-depressants; I'm not sure if this is substantiated and frankly I don't really care either way. It's still a fun out-and-out pop song.)

        The album's biggest curveball, "Belong", follows. Speak-sung by Stipe, throughout the song's verses he recalls the minutiae of everyday life of a housewife in a beat-poet narrative style over a steady, sparse drum-focused backing and between a lilting, vocalised and memorable chorus. It tends to split fans, but I'm firmly on the "fan" side - it's among R.E.M.'s most successful "experiments".

        Ballad "Half A World Day" is next. The line "My hand is tired / my heart aches" has led some to conclude it's about masturbation but I'm inclined to lean on the more conservative side here and say it's simply about yearning for a lost lover. It's a solid song that is home to some of Stipe's most beautiful vocals: they are at the front of the mix and they really work there, supported by a slow-to-mid-tempo backing that recalls both fairground music and, er, Simon and Garfunkel.

        "Texarkana" brings Mike Mills to lead vocal duties once again, and once again, it works magnificently. Living up to its name (a contraction of Texas/Arkansas/Louisiana) it's about as archetypally "Americana" as R.E.M. have got this side of "(Don't Go Back To) Rockville" and delivers a wonderful vocal backed with Springsteen-style "Wall of Sound" backing and another wonderfully-catchy chorus.

        Penultimate track "Country Feedback" has a long been a fan-favourite (and indeed Stipe claims it to be his favourite R.E.M. song too) - a slow, brooding country ballad with stream-of-consciousness lyrics. "We've been through fake-a breakdowns, self-hurt .. self-pain, EST, psychics, fuck all.." Stipe sings, the emotion in his voice subtle but nevertheless palpable, especially when combined with the well-judged calm, quiet backing. Not a personal favourite but it speaks to many.

        The album concludes with the second Stipe-and-Pierson duet of the album, "Me In Honey", an ode to pregnancy, of all things. Generically poppy, it shines thanks to the juxtaposition in tones of the two lead vocalists. It's enjoyable and eminently listenable, a solid end to an amazing album.

        What often first strikes R.E.M. fans about this album is the relative lack of Michael Stipe on vocals. One track's an instrumental, two are sung primarily by Mike Mills, on two he shares vocal duties with Kate Pierson, on two he speak-sings and on one a verse is performed by KRS-One. That leaves three traditional Stipe-sung songs - perhaps too few for some, but this diversity adds to the experience of the album immensely. Don't let detractors write this off as mere fluff pop; it's much more subtle, varied and diverse than that.

        The CD of the album, which comes in a standard jewel case and includes a lyric sheet, can be found for a few quid on Amazon Marketplace nowadays (mine was £3.50 in 2005, and it's only getting cheaper). You might also shell out for the CD/DVD special edition, which includes on the DVD the album in full Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround Sound and some promo videos from the album.

        Parental Guidance note: there's no sticker on the front, but there is one use of bad language ("fuck", in "Country Feedback")

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          12.09.2002 05:28
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          American rock has always been the stuff of legend - somehow so much more authentic than our own home bred mimics. The US had Elvis Presley and Eddie Cochrane, Britain had Cliff Richard and (perish the thought) Tommy Steele (remember Little White Bull). We had The Motors and The Jags and they had REM, 'nuff said. Ah well, we've had our share of high spots, but the band from Georgia who named themselves after the acronym for Rapid Eye Movement have always been honorary Brits, with their thoughtful, uplifting, earnest, consideration, like the Smiths but with a singer who wasn't a joke and melodies which flowed rather than chugged (sorry, Mozza and Johnny, but you know what I mean). REM have always dripped credibility with their studious image and student-crowded following, intellects who could write a mean tune which mattered, and they've garnered a huge and committed following over in Blighty and demanded your attention. REM are/were Bill Berry (drums, percussion), Peter Buck (guitars and other stringed things), Mike Mills (bass, keyboards) and Michael Stipe (vocals), one of the smallest men in rock. They're a captivating, serious, artistic bunch of old men who matter. Their mythical, taxing, rewarding albums have always done well over here and earned an appreciative audience. In fact, REM have nearly everything imaginable going for them. There's just one bad thing about them, in fact. THEY'RE SO GODDAMNED BORING AND DULL. Nice black and white clothes, moody careworn faces, decent haircuts and a worthy approach to life. They play well, sing well and write good songs, offering excellent value, and being genuinely difficult to find fault with, but there?s always that nagging, worrying problem about them. THEY MAKE YOU GO TO SLEEP. Still, listen to tracks like Losing My Religion and Shiny Happy People and you can forgive them (virtually) everything. Out Of Time is the band's 1991 album, a
          nd while it doesn't have near the instantaneous classic and pull of the superb Automatic For The People set, but it's nevertheless a wonderful, wonderful collection which you?d struggle to find fault with, apart (I suppose) from the boring cover, and boring photos, and boring cartoons on the fold out booklet in the CD. Lord, they're even on Warner Bros, ferchrissakes. Still, boredom and dullness and worthiness are what REM are all about and no one does it any better than them, do they? Radio Song Blissful, transatlantic pop with great guitar and organ, and aching, gorgeous vocals, this one rocks. It bounces along, tugging you irresistibly in its flow. These men are grown up, but they certainly write a mean single and have a certain way with hooks which you'd be hard pressed not to like. They've got all the slow bits and strings and pauses in exactly the right place like all the real bands do, but they manage to breathe new life into orthodox rock and inject urgency and meaning where there is vapid emptiness. Classic, classic REM this, putting the competition firmly in their place, while smacking unmistakably of the B-52s. Losing My Religion A massive hit single, which is most memorable for its wonderful mandolin lines and classic Stipe vocal - little boy lost, badly hurt and turned out of the village, like a lost watcher, persecuted by the bigger boys in the class. Losing My Religion has hidden depths of beauty and even merits the flowing, gorgeous strings which never quite overpower everything. No one else writes classic pop rock quite as well as these boys and few use the mandolin as eloquently, at least since Rod Stewart and the Faces in their heyday (sorry, folks, but check out Mandolin Wind, Farewell and some other of the man?s early work pre-Britt and the blazers). Low Nagging, fidgety urging, understated and muted in tone, but every bit as gripping as all the other great songs on this al
          bum. The insistent blocked guitar riff and swirling organ build the mood up nicely, but Stipe continues his low key love poetry, picking away at our senses and using neat wordplay and some of his classic phrasing tricks to pique our interest. REM are wonderfully good at songs and moods like this, totally controlled at one minute, yet always capable of letting go and giving free rein to their wilder side. Near Wild Heaven Jingle jangle orthodox American folksy rock of the kind which REM have always excelled at, but seem to churn out so effortlessly that you often think they're operating on automatic and do the stuff without even having to think about it. Never trust a gifted American instrumentalist, no backbone these boys and they insist on calling footie Soccer (with that damned annoying capital S). Sadly, this is them at their dullest. Endgame This is interesting in a very boring way, or boring in a very interesting way (whichever you prefer), all acoustic finger picking and poetry, though there's some captivating guitar lines on here. Shiny Happy People Enough of the makeweights, more neat stop-start REM hit single material, and one of their most uplifting, addictive songs, although you can never really imagine Michael Stipe laughing or even smirking, can you? However, the irony ain't lost on the band and at least they do have an earnest kind of self deprecation to their bows. I love this song, with its lovely, timeless quality and sense of order and orthodoxy. REM will never win any prizes for earth shattering experimentation, but they can certainly write a decent song. Could have done without the slow middle bit, but at least it gives Mikey the chance to sing "Here we go" and embarrass himself as they pick their way up from it. Belong A moody, rumbling piece of music which drips authenticity and feeling. Leaden paced, but filled with some nice rhythm guitar jangles and understate
          ment. Ho hum, this album is so good, it?s getting terribly boring. Half A World Away More gorgeous mandolin lead, more neatsy folk rock, more yearning, pleading vocals, more effortless brilliance. You just wish they'd fall flat on their collective smug faces for once in their entire worthy lives. It's a goodie. Texarkana Nice, country tinged music which reminds one of nothing so much as a speeded up Dire Straits, but Michael Stipe is a much better singer than Mark Knopfler and he doesn?t bother with a head band (still, he?s bald, uh ho, Knopfler's not exactly overflowing with hair himself). At last, though, this is a routine number which you'll struggle to remember. Oh damn, I just heard a pretty neat stop-start bit with a neat bass rumble which'll make me come back to admire its beauty. Don't these guys ever let up? Bloody hell, they've done it again. I hate them. Country Feedback Lovely pedal steel guitar from John Keane is the most distinctive part of another song with country overtones. Still, REM don't trade in distinctiveness, they trade in hugely consistent, great rock music, and this is more of the same. Me In Honey Look at them, upping the tempo on the closer, to leave you on a high note, what an obvious bloody trick, didn't they think we'd spot such cack handed manoeuvres. Well I did, but who can argue with them. PS Don't believe all my narking, bickering and moaning. REM are a special talent and deserve every plaudit they?ve been given. I admire them with every fibre of my being and I'm glad they've seen fit to shower us with their work. Out Of Time is a great, great album, a classic of the 90's.

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            28.03.2002 23:37
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            R.E.M enjoyed true success with this album which put them on the map in this country. Ten songs makes it short on quantity but very high on quality. "Pop song" track 1 has an annoying intro but that is quickly brushed aside by a great REM song which enjoyed chart success. "Losing my religion" was the first release off the album and also enjoyed success,it is accompanied by a video which is absolute madness.Its a pop song with a distinct guitar rhythm and slow vocals which could be descibed as depressing by critics of the band. "Low" isnt the best on the album but still good and a catchy chorus. "Near wild heaven" ups the pace from the previous two lifting the mood from gloomy to happiness,a usual REM guitar song. "Endgame" with its lalalalala intro is probably fast forwarded a lot but if u stick with it long enough is actually quite harmonious! "Shiny happy people" is a very well known REM song and was a top ten hit for the band,very upbeat and poppy you cant help but like it. "Belong" is an unusual song with unusual lyrics (not uncommon for REM)!! My own personal favourite is "Half a world away" which is a beautiful song and shows Micheal Stipes class.I remember it being performed acoustically on Jools Holland and it was even better.Its a ballad with nice lyrics. "Texarkana" is a weaker album track in my opinion,probably better only than "Belong" "Country Feedback" is a very slow ballad but with powerfully given vocals. "Me in honey" completes the album and starts with a female intro then descending into a one paced guitar driven track. Going on record sales id say this album is second only to "Automatic for the people" for REM. It was my first purchase from the artist and i played it constantly at the time
            ,i suppose now it sounds a bit aged and lacking in depth but is a quality album nevetheless. A bit slow and downbeat at times it is probably most suitable for those quiter evenings we all have.

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              15.10.2001 00:18
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              People who accuse this album of being too happy aren't paying attention to the lyrics, which are among Stipe's (and Mills's) best (and darkest). This is an album about love and the pain left when it's gone. KRS-One's rant aside, Radio Song is about that song that seems to follow you everywhere you go, taunting you with the problems in your relationship. Losing My Religion is about the mania of love. Low, in my opinion, is about being in love with someone with whom the subject seems impossible to talk about. Near Wild Heaven is about a feeling of being broken, and trying to hold yourself together despite it all. Endgame is an instrumental best described as going through a skywalk. Shiny Happy People is, yes, about being with your friends, having fun and feeling happy, but it cracks into Belong, which is about motherhood, peer pressure, and suicide. Half A World Away seems to be about the feeling that the pressure's squarely on you to keep a relationship alive. Texarkana... well, it sounds really good. I'm not sure what it's about. Country Feedback is one of the best bad-day songs ever written. Need a song for a breakup that neither party wants but one needs? Listen to this the day after the break or the day before, depending on who's behind it. Me in Honey is about love during pregnancy, and has choice lines that work in any situation. If you like powerful and beautiful music with a strong dark undertone that occasionally rises to the surface, this album is essential.

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                23.06.2001 22:48
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                Out of time takes the biscuit as the best ever REM album in my opinion. It typifies REM's original, ever changing music style. With all of the hype surrounding Reveal's release I think people may be forgetting some of the earlier and best REM albums (Out of time and Automatic for the People particularly). If anyone is a perspective REM fan and can only choose one album to begin with, go out and get Out of Time instead of Reveal, it is much deeper and more typical of REM's timeless style. Out of Time is happy in a satirical way - best captured by Shiny Happy people - what an excellent song! My advice - BUY IT TODAY!!!!

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                  29.04.2001 20:13
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                  Out Of Time was REM's seventh studio album (and second under Warner Bros) and to this day remains one of my favourites. In its armoury is possibly the single greatest song of all time, Losing My Religion. The album is quieter and has a more folky feel than their predecessing album, Green, reaching back to some of their first albums under the IRS label. The album opens with 'Radio Song', featuring guest vocals by KRS-1. The song can be immediately recognised as a statement against the utter crap that was (and still is today) constantly on the radio. "Now our children grow up prisoners, all their life radio listeners." The song isn't the best the band have ever produced, and all memory is erased as Peter Buck's mandolin signals the introduction of 'Losing My Religion'. This is a very moody song and a classic of modern music. I've often noticed that the song can either seem to be playing very quickly and furiously, or slower and moodier, almost depending on my own mood at the time. I absolutely love it. Following that are the slow, depressing 'Low' and the almost cheery 'Near Wild Heaven' with lead vocals by Mike Mills. Thinking back on this song it seems almost impossible that Michael Stipe could have done a better job himself. We then hear the instrumental 'Endgame' and following that is 'Shiny Happy People' - possibly the band's most hated song ever. Nonetheless, I do find it a fun song to listen to on certain occasions, though others times it does nothing but annoy me. Mills himself said that while Shiny Happy people is a good song, it's not something you'd want to be remembered for. And why should they be, havng produced much better songs over their 20 year career? Next up is 'Belong', a song which for some reason reeks of "filler" whenever I play it. It's still a good song anyway, and leads on to 'Half A Worl
                  d Away', a soft folky song that relaxes the listener for three and a half minutes. 'Texarkana' follows, and almost appears to be a rocky song in contrast to the one which came before, though still very folky. Next is 'Country Feedback', a song which would easily have been the album's best if not for 'Losing My Religion'. Like 'Low' it can seem to be depressing, but whenever listened to carefully it reveals itself to be a beautifully crafted work of art. Mostly likely too good to have been a single as there's no justice in the music world. The album then comes to a close with 'Me In Honey', a song that doesn't really strike any sort of chord with the listener, though at the end you're left wanting more. Out Of Time is an amazing album, but unfortunately it does appear to have a few too many fillers out of the eleven. As REM's breakthrough album though, it is a piece of music history and almost a necessity for anybody's CD collection.

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                    10.12.2000 03:17
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                    'Out of Time' must rate as one of the best R.E.M. albums and arguably as one of the greatest albums of the 1990’s, this is REM at their best. Part of the beauty of this album is the real diversity contained in the playlist. Since this album REM have become increasingly downbeat in their music and lyrics, seemingly ashamed to be upbeat and positive in any of their music, whether this is middle age, a sense of guilt or embarrassment at the financial success that they have achieved or just a sign of the times where cynicism and pessimism are the fashion I couldn’t say. What is for sure though is that ‘Out of Time’ marks the last time that you hear REM in their naked pop mode for tracks such as the incomparable ‘Shiny Happy People’. The other track recognizable to anyone on this album is the brilliant ‘Losing my Religion’ but these two tracks represent just the tip of the iceberg, the whole album is just magic. Great listening, a must for anyone, whether they consider themselves fans of REM or not.

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                      20.10.2000 20:54

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                      This has to be all-time classic album, as it includes the hits Shiny Happy People, Losing my Religion and Radio Song. It does have loads of other good songs such as Low and Me In Honey. If you don't own this album then you should, as it's not just for REM fans, but for everyone (especially as you can pick it up on a special offer somewhere now.) A great album from REM with great sounds, and great music that is excellently put together and executed.

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                      05.10.2000 06:37
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                      Out Of Time pre-ceeds REM's most popular album, Automatic For The People, but I think Out Of Time is just as excellent! Although this album is slightly short with 11 songs, they are all fantastic. From the start with "Radio Song" through until the end to "Me In Honey". With the most popular track from this album, probably "Losing My Religion", Out Of Time is one of the best REM album's with its folk style sound. "Near Wild Heaven" is one of my favourite's from this album. Apart from the slight shortness of the album you will not be disappointed because it is filled full of quality music of lyrics. One to buy if you already do not have it!

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                        03.10.2000 00:06
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                        Out of Time was the 1991 release which saw REM's explosion onto the world stage. Featuring songs of the likes of "Radio Song", "Near Wild Heaven" and "Shiny Happy People" it boasts songs of a superb quality, although it is a lot less heavy than the band?s recent releases. Of course the most famous song on this album is "Losing My Religion". It is possibly the strongest example on the album of singer Michael Stipe's ability to make a song come alive. There is something about the way he sings it which makes it what it is, yet it is vastly different to his singing on "Shiny Happy People". The band show versatility and style, but most of all they present excellent music.

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                          06.09.2000 03:22

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                          Out of time is a classic album. This was one of the biggest records of the nineties, especially in the US. R.E.M. are one of those bands that will go on forever and carry on after that. R.E.M. has developed their own brand of music that cannot be pigeonholed. This album contains classic track's such as "Losing my religion", "The radio song" and "Shining happy people" This is a must have for any record collection. A great album for listening to while crusin on the open road.

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                          27.08.2000 10:49
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                          After releasing a succession of great but largely unappreciated records over the course of a decade, REM finally achieved world domination with OUT OF TIME. Yet curiously it toned down the political sentiment and abrasive rock that had marked much of their previous work. OUT OF TIME is all lush strings and ethereal harmonies, very much in the vein of the Byrds, the Beach Boys, and sun-soaked west coast American pop. Kate Pierson (of fellow Athens, Georgia band the B-52s) even provides folk-pop backing vocals on some key tracks. The album contains numerous REM classics: the Mike Mills-vocalled 'Near Wild Heaven', the summer-of-love throwback 'Shiny Happy People', and perhaps the most lyrically oblique song ever to become a worldwide hit, 'Losing My Religion' ("Life is bigger...bigger than you...and you are not me...") The haunting 'Country Feedback' and jangly but downbeat 'Half A World Away' are just as good, and even fillers like 'Endgame' and 'Texarkana' make for amiable listening. Only the ill-conceived funk pastiche opener 'Radio Song' (featuring rapper KRS-1) could be classed as a misfire. OUT OF TIME is a shallow album when compared to much of REM's other work, but the immaculate production and the effortless quality of the song-writing make it nothing but a pleasure to listen to.

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                          17.08.2000 04:07

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                          Out Of Time pre-ceeds REM's most popular album, Automatic For The People, but I think Out Of Time is just as excellent! Although this album is slightly short with 11 songs, they are all fantastic. From the start with "Radio Song" through until the end to "Me In Honey". With the most popular track from this album, probably "Losing My Religion", Out Of Time is one of the best REM album's with its folk style sound. "Near Wild Heaven" is one of my favourite's from this album. Apart from the slight shortness of the album you will not be disappointed because it is filled full of quality music of lyrics. One to buy if you already do not have it!

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                          16.08.2000 02:30
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                          Along with 'Automatic For The People', 'Out Of Time' (released in 1991) is R.E.M.'s most well known album to date. The album is arguably the groups strongest and probably just has the edge over 'Automatic For The People' as my own personal favourite R.E.M. album. 'Losing My Religion' put R.E.M. on the pedestal they deserved and cannot be doubted as one of the songs of the decade. Still, in my opinion, one of their very best, it has both a depressing and uplifting feel at the same time and is the highlight of an excellent album. The other 'big time' song on the album is not typical of R.E.M. but its commercial appeal helped sell the album and 'Shiny Happy People' is THE uplifting track on what is otherwise a very downbeat album. Two of the songs on the back-end of the album rank as two of the groups most depressing; noteably 'Half A World Away' and 'Country Feedback' see all band members at their best, although these tracks can only truly be appreciated live and lose their edge on an album. However, they are still exceptional songs and sandwiched between, 'Texarkana', gives a welcome break whilst still maintaining the flow of the album. Similar to 'Texarkana', 'Near Wild Heaven' is a song which is very catchy and on first listen will grab you most. One of the advantages this album has over 'Automatic For The People' is that the instrumental, 'Endgame', is much stronger than the equivalent on 'Automatic...' and, although not of primary importance, it does demonstrate how 'Out Of Time' has somewhat more style than the album which followed it. All in all one of the best albums of the nineties and R.E.M. at the best during the middle phase of the groups existence.

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                        • Product Details

                          Disc #1 Tracklisting
                          1 Radio Song
                          2 Losing My Religion
                          3 Low
                          4 Near Wild Heaven
                          5 Endgame
                          6 Shiny Happy People
                          7 Belong
                          8 Half A World Away
                          9 Texarkana
                          10 Country Feedback
                          11 Me In Honey

                          Disc #2 Tracklisting
                          1 Entire Album in 5.1 Surround Sound
                          2 Time Piece Documentary (interview and commentary by the band with music including:
                          3 Losing My Religion (3 minute acoustic studio version)
                          4 Near Wild Heaven (Snippet)
                          5 Me In Honey (Snippet)
                          6 Radio Song (Snippet)
                          7 Country Feedback (Snippet)
                          8 Texarkana (Snippet)
                          9 Shiny Happy People (Snippet)
                          10 Losing My Religion (Snippet)
                          11 Losing My Religion (Video)