Welcome! Log in or Register

Ram It Down - Judas Priest

  • image
£7.68 Best Offer by: amazon.co.uk See more offers
2 Reviews

Genre: Hard Rock & Metal - Heavy Metal / Artist: Judas Priest / Audio CD released 2002-03-04 at Columbia

  • Sort by:

    * Prices may differ from that shown

  • Write a review >
    How do you rate the product overall? Rate it out of five by clicking on one of the hearts.
    What are the advantages and disadvantages? Use up to 10 bullet points.
    Write your reviews in your own words. 250 to 500 words
    Number of words:
    Write a concise and readable conclusion. The conclusion is also the title of the review.
    Number of words:
    Write your email adress here Write your email adress

    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    2 Reviews
    Sort by:
    • More +
      29.03.2012 12:36
      Very helpful
      (Rating)

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      This is how 1980s heavy metal should, and did, sound.

      "Ram it Down" is the 11th studio album by British heavy metal band, Judas Priest. It was released in 1988 on Columbia Records and produced by the band with Tom Allom. The line-up for the album was Rob Halford (vocals), Glenn Tipton (guitar), K.K. Downing (guitar), Ian Hill (bass) and Dave Holland (drums).

      It's hard to imagine a band still going strong in 2012 - as Judas Priest is - releasing its 11th album 24 years prior, but what you have here is the band's heaviest record. That is until the release of its successor, 1990's "Painkiller". "Ram it Down" would be the last Priest studio album produced by Tom Allom, after he'd worked with the band since 1979, and the final studio album with long-time drummer, Dave Holland.

      The album's opener and title song begins with a piercing Rob Halford scream before hitting the listener with the twin guitars of Downing and Tipton which don't let up until the song's over. As is the norm with many a Judas Priest record, the guitar solo duel is a highlight of this track.

      "Heavy Metal" is a slower-paced song, but has that catchy chorus everyone strived for at that time. However, the lyrics are rather clichéd, revolving around playing guitars and concerts with leather clothing, chains and bullet belts.

      "Love Zone" takes the album on a downward slide with its almost glam metal tones; you'd likely hear the likes of Poison, Ratt and Mötley Crüe singing playing a song like this, but definitely not a band like Judas Priest.

      On to "Come and Get It", which makes up for the lack of Judas Priest-ness on the previous two songs. Finally we get what we want and that's Halford's full vocal range, Tipton/Downing guitars in synchrony, which makes it the stand-out song on the album.

      With "Hard as Iron" we get a taste of what Dave Holland can do on a drumkit. The double bass is fast, and in a jazz-style beat it pulls the song through, lifting the album back on its feet from its earlier downward spiral.

      "Blood Red Skies" begins with an intro of guitars which sound not unlike the main orchestral harmony from Kylie Minogue's "Confide in Me"... although this was written a good 7 years before Kylie released that single. Who says pop stars don't steal from metal artists?! Halford's vocals are on absolutely top form here, too. At nearly 8 minutes long, the song is by far the longest on the album and can be classed as a power ballad, although I'm sure the band doesn't see it that way.

      "I'm a Rocker" is another Judas Priest classic, giving the listener a treat in heavy metal. The song keeps to the same tempo from start to end, and it is a crowd favourite at many a Priest gig.

      What can be said about "Johnny B. Goode"? Everyone knows this record and if you don't, where have you been in the music world? Chuck Berry recorded the original, and it has been covered by everyone from AC/DC to The Who, with Judas Priest inbetween... and I'm afraid Priest's version just doesn't work for me. It's too full, too much more added, guitar-wise.

      "Love You to Death" has that 1980s metal feel to it. A simple fist-banging chorus with chugging guitars and a solid drum beat. It's one of the easiest songs the band recorded for the album, but it's also one of the best.

      "Monsters of Rock" is one of my favourite records, ever. It pays homage to the Donington Monsters of Rock festival, which was held annually from 1980 until 1996. I have been to many of these gigs, but unfortunately not in 1980 when Judas Priest played for the first and only time, along with Touch, Riot, Saxon, April Wine, Scorpions and headliners, Rainbow.

      In summary, "Ram it Down" is one of my favourite Judas Priest albums. Halford doesn't really hit the high notes as we've grown used to him doing, but what he does is more than most vocalists could ever dream of. He's effortless when singing and makes it sound so easy, when it really isn't. The album gets a big thumbs up from me.

      1. Ram it Down
      2. Heavy Metal
      3. Love Zone
      4. Come and Get It
      5. Hard as Iron
      6. Blood Red Skies
      7. I'm a Rocker
      8. Johnny B. Goode
      9. Love You to Death
      10. Monsters of Rock

      My rating: 8/10

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
    • More +
      07.08.2008 23:24
      Very helpful
      (Rating)
      2 Comments

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      Judas Priest's eleventh album (1988).

      In a seeming attempt to win back the fan base they had alienated with the disco-metal of 'Turbo,' Judas Priest decided that song titles with the words 'rock,' 'hard' and 'heavy metal' in them would be enough of an apology. While it doesn't exactly work like that, it's true that this is a heavier and louder album than its predecessor, but still some distance from the intensity and speed of 'Screaming for Vengeance,' partly due to the continued reliance on electronic-sounding drums.

      The synthetic drum sound smacks unpleasantly of the cheesy side of the eighties, and the band's lyrics don't help this negative image, frequently sounding like off-cuts from Manowar right from the opening track. The music is still fun and memorable, but the band seems to rely increasingly on the idea that heavy riffs will disguise the fact that they're essentially playing a bad pop song in the likes of 'Love Zone' and 'Come and Get It,' and it's only when they try something different in the form of 'Blood Red Skies' that they really get my attention. Reminiscent of the earlier 'Desert Plains,' this is an atmospheric and compelling song, and the only real classic here, though the title track is pretty fun in a daft way. 'A million guitars?' Come on.

      1. Ram It Down
      2. Heavy Metal
      3. Love Zone
      4. Come and Get It
      5. Hard as Iron
      6. Blood Red Skies
      7. I'm a Rocker
      8. Johnny B. Goode (Chuck Berry cover)
      9. Love You to Death
      10. Monsters of Rock

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
    • Product Details

      Disc #1 Tracklisting
      1 Ram it down
      2 Heavy metal
      3 Love zone
      4 Come and get it
      5 Hard as iron
      6 Blood red skies
      7 I'm a rocker
      8 Johnny B Goode
      9 Love you to death
      10 Monsters of rock
      11 Night comes down (live)
      12 Bloodstone (live)