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Second Coming - Stone Roses

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  • and errr.. not the first album
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      17.09.2011 14:38
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      Good but not great

      Second Coming is the second and - as it turned out - final album by The Stone Roses and was first released in 1994. The album was highly anticipated but met with a decidedly mixed reception that mostly bordered on the lukewarm. The Stone Roses were truly great at their mighty best but they were undone in the end by the fatal combination of drugs and laziness. Their debut 1989 album was a perfect pop bulletin pitched somewhere in between rave and The Byrds but their failure to capitalise on the success of this record much sooner more or less spelled the end for these scruffy but (Ian Brown aside) incredibly talented Mancunian rascals. Second Coming simply wasn't as good as the first record and too much time had now passed. The momentum had been lost and they'd sort of stepped out of their time already. It certainly has its moments though and is still the subject of some debate amongst Stone Roses fans. Was it a dreadful anti-climax after the long wait or a greatly unappreciated album of hidden depths and delights? Probably a bit of both. By far the most important member of The Stone Roses was their brilliant guitarist John Squire. He's a bit of a pretentious and miserable git in any interviews I've seen him do but his only peers in his generation were Johnny Marr and Bernard Butler and his music is instantly recognisable and frequently inspired and uplifting. The least talented member of the group was actually their singer Ian Brown. He can't sing to save his life to be honest - and Stone Roses lyrics were mostly, though not always, rather prosaic and meaningless - but it didn't really seem to matter when the music was this great. The bass player and drummer are amazing though and in perfect sync with Squire as if they had some sort of cosmic telepathic connection. I suppose you would describe The Stone Roses as a perfect fusion of guitar pop and dance music at their best. Here though, Squire is starting to become indulgent and very seventies prog rock with solos that go on forever. But he hasn't quite lost his muse altogether. Parts of Second Coming are still superb and inspired even if you do have to sift through some forgettable tangents to get there.

      The first song on Second Coming is Breaking into Heaven. It's wonderful but does go on a bit too much for its own good. John Squire's dexterous and trippily funky guitar riffs are sumptuous and dreamily transporting and Ian Brown manages not to bungle this one too much with a (for him) solid enough vocal performance throughout. This is a faster song but still has a strangely languid and relaxed (if you'll pardon the expression) groove. It is a spiffy way to enter Second Coming and immediately raises one's expectations. Too much as it turns out. Driving South - the second song here - is not so spiffy. It's again a faster song but becomes quite repetitive rather quickly and Ian Brown is not so great on this one. With no discernible hook or chorus his somewhat breathless ramblings soon become grating and annoying - like a dog barking somewhere in the distance at 2 in the morning when you are half asleep. Ten Storey Love Song is next and one of the high peaks of Second Coming. This is an irresistible jangle strewn and stately guitar pop opus with Ian Brown at his best - delivering a rather touching and nicely paced vocal with decent enough lyrics ("When your heart is black and broken, And you need a helping hand..."). It begins sounding vaguely Indian and just as your patience is starting to be tested with this unavoidably pretentious intro waffle, John Squire's guitars kick in with a rich sugar laden spine tingling whoosh as potent as ten cans of fizzy Vimto that have been vigorously shaken to within an inch of their dark purple lives.

      Daybreak is ok but less essential. Squire's patented rhythmic chiming guitars are more in evidence elsewhere. On Second Coming he often seeks a slightly darker and more low slung sound but The Stone Roses are really at their best with life-affirming glitter dusted uncomplicated pop, most saliently because - in terms of their lyrics - they really have absolutely nothing to say. Daybreak is a prime example ("This is the daybreak, And this is the love we make, For love is the law here, You got to know how I love it, yeah...") of the simple "I want to fly high in the sky" vacuity and journeyman emptiness of the words that go with these songs. There is not much wit or poetry on show here. The attempts to take the music in a more complicated direction are sometimes interesting but some of these songs are longer than they really need to be I think. The debut album worked much better for being a precise pop bulletin (plus of course it had a surfeit of great songs whereas Second Coming has less than a handful of corkers). Next up is Straight To the Man, an edgy skulker with typically obtuse lyrics and it's alright without becoming anything tremendously exciting. There are one or two too many songs on Second Coming that merely adequate and sit somewhere in between mediocre and inspired without dangling a foot in either camp to any noticeable degree.

      Begging You is an enjoyably breezy dance music/pop fusion that thankfully manages to restrain itself and come in at under five minutes while Tightrope is folksy and The Stone Roses in a softer mood. The fact that they locked themselves away in an isolated and rural environment to record second Coming seems to have have inspired a couple of gentler songs that feel more pastoral than urban, the other being Your Star Will Shine. Both are ok as far as they go and pleasant enough. As ever, it's the guitars of John Squire rather than anything Ian Brown is doing that are of most interest. The Stone Roses were not a Morrissey/Marr partnership where both were equally important. You could quite easily argue in fact that could have been even better if they'd dumped Brown for a better singer. His attitude and personality is sort of in the spirit of the music I suppose but he was hardly irreplaceable. Tears is rather similar and sounds a bit country and western at first before it speeds up and heavier guitars arrive. It never really becomes that memorable though and the more introspective quieter sections of the song do tend to magnify the fact that Ian Brown isn't the world's greatest singer. How Do You Sleep is a mid tempo poppish song, very forgettable. One of those songs you have to listen to again to remind yourself what it was like. The final song - Love Spreads - is probably the best thing here. It was the comeback single and everyone probably thought the entire album was going to be brilliant when they heard it. Love Spreads is The Stone Roses at their swaggering best with incredible guitars by John Squire. Ian Brown doesn't quite manage to keep up but even he can't wreck the essential brilliance at the heart of Love Spreads. This is a monstrous display of musical virtuosity by Squire and excellent.

      Second Coming is great at times but just inconsistent and too rambling for its own good. It will frustrate those who loved the first album but there are are still some great things to be discovered here. I would ideally like to give this ***½ out of ***** as it's better than *** and not quite so good as **** if that makes any sense! Overall this is an album of great moments rather than a great album. At the time of writing you can buy Second Coming for under a fiver.

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        08.11.2010 03:26
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        Half the album shows what a brilliant band this was, the other half the rushed nature of the album.

        After over 5 years of waiting, the record company in charge finally told the Stone Roses to produce an album, and this was it. You can see it's rushed in places: Daybreak is just a loose jam (but a great one at that- if only there was more time to it!), Straight to the Man is something that would have fitted into Ian Brown's lo-fi debut album, Unfinished Monkey Business, without an eyebrow raised, and How Do You Sleep? just seems like a half-baked idea of a song that never takes off or lands.

        Ian Brown has since said that the band were just tired after so much media interest (especially with the court case releasing them from their 'prohibitive' previous record deal), and this album sounds so.

        There are some great high points though: Breaking Into Heaven is John Squire at his best, with squelching wah-riffs starting the album off with a bang (mind you, after 4 and a half minutes of jungle noises, apparently each minute signifying each year away); Love Spreads is, according to Bobby Gillespie, the greatest comeback single of all time, this time with a thundering John Squire blues riff, and Begging You is a mix of backwards guitars, pounding drums from Reni, and mystic Ian Brown lyrics- it's the only Brown/Squire written song on the album, and that in itself is a shame as you could see where the Stone Roses could have gone if there wasn't such a feud between the two. Ten Storey Love Song is the Roses at their best: much like the melodic pop songs off their first album.

        I think the main question which has to be asked about this album is: if it was written by anybody else, how would it be received? It was panned at the time for, basically, not being what people expected (Mani claimed this was because they had matured in the few years), but there are some great songs on here, despite some chaff.

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        23.06.2010 17:43
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        A fantastic album, particularly for guitar fans.

        Second Coming has in the past received critical reviews, but this is in no small part due to camparison with the Stone Roses first, self-titled album. Yet comparing the two isn't really fair - the albums are simply different. What remains the same is the thumping rhythm section of Mani and Reni, whose bass and drums, respectively, are almost incomparably brilliant. They provide a swaggering groove, a sound personifying the band itself, over which Ian Brown and John Squire characterise the songs.

        This is where the difference between the first and second album predominantly lies. This song was written almost exclusively by guitarist Squire, rather than the Brown/Squire partnership that crafted the first album. Naturally then, the music takes on a much more guitar-based approach. This, however, doesn't necessarily mean the album is any worse or any better than the first. What Second Coming is then, is an amalgamation of the problems confronting the band at the time, from lawsuits, to overspending the £1m they received from Geffen for the record deal. It is easy to forgive the album for its lack of balance for this reason, though the songs aren't crafted as tightly as the 3-minute pop songs on The Stone Roses.

        With that taken into account, the album does what it sets out to do, and does it fantastically. Squire's guitarwork on this album is truly incredible - he manages to load the album with intricate guitar riffs, while retaining orginality with every title. Breaking Into Heaven makes the wah-pedal sound like it was invented for that very song, while Straight To The Man is a funky tune - one of Brown's sporadic contributions. Begging You, on the other hand, is an intense song that always sounds like it's struggling to break out, an effect that is truly endearing. Meanwhile, Love Spreads sits in a genre of its own, dipping a toe into dance, rock, funk and pop.

        The lyrics are typically original and compelling, with subtle references to classic books, films and paintings. Brown's lyrical contributions in Straight To The Man and Daybreak are also brilliant, with their deft political and religious undertones. The former provides an attack on the colonial Britain at it's deepest, and yet it remains an easily accessible pop song.

        To appreciate this album, it needs to be heard a couple of times. With such an emphasis on the guitar, Second Coming ought to be given due time to shine, and with Squire's every exploration of the fretboard producing magic, it deserves this.

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        29.07.2002 21:13
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        What is Brit pop? British pop music? a new star spangled ice cream? Perhaps it is a freudian slip unintentionally telling of the up coming demise of 'popular' British music. You protest i hear! Firstly its a comment on the state of 'popular', as in sells records. i dont want somebody telling me that the British music scene is alive and kicking, you just have to go to the far reaches to listen to a band that has a back catalogue o two songs, but 'oh my! are they good.' When you gear music around ten year old girls and unimmaginative college geeks, its what you should expect. It wasnt always like this. To spread your name now, what do you do? go on a tv competition? radio playlist and your made. ( why hasnt robbie williams made it in America? cause hes rubbish thats why. How come he sells in England if hes rubbish you say? There's one radio station in England, get on it, however bad you are and your laughing. In America there are 50 odd states each with a number of decent stations, quality does count.). What did the stone Roses do? They went around there home town of Manchester spray painting there name on every available piece of wall space, bridges, chimmneys, buildings, anything. class. lets see those winos toploader do that. After their debut album, much was expected of the manchester group. Being young and famous though, the white stuff (and i aint talking milk here) had infiltrated their lives, and the 'second coming' would become their last. ( a pity you might say. i dont agree. why? firstly, like the stones, it was a group dynamic. Ian brown on his own has done ok, but only cause of the Roses, and the least said about the Sea horses the better. Also, if they would have carried on they might have ended up like oasis, continually, and unsuccessfully, trying to live up to former glories.) Perhaps not as devastating as their first but a classic none the less. After 4 years of legal battles, the
        Roses at one point breaking into the record companies office, no doubt fuelled by coke, they ransacked the place, feeling that they had been 'ripped off' on their debut, the second coming was finally unleashed. John Squires guiytar playing had become top notch, which is evident as soon as 'driving south' kicks in. Moving up and down the fret board effortlessly. Ian browns voice matured ten fold to the point where you could actually call him a singer. 'Ten storey love song' is superb, the melodies on the chorus are timeless, almost beautiful. Who listens to the Roses? 'i came to sing this song in your city 'ohh, for the dreamers 'one more for the dreamers, yeah These lyrics on 'day break' tell us who. The dreamers of Manchester, the city that gets many a mention in their lyrics. The production is quality, the musicians were coming of age, and i think they knew it. 'yeah the eyes of grande bretagne all eyes of 'grande bretagne owe us a debt The biblical 'straight to the man' tells how good their music is. And great Britain does owe them a huge musical debt, make no mistake they, and this album are mighty fine. There isnt a bad track. 'Tightrope' and 'tears' would be good enough on their own. 'im on a tight rope baby, 'nine miles high The album climaxes with 'love spreads' but before that comes 'how do you sleep', perhaps my favourite Roses song. You see, its hard to pick a favourite, it depends on your mood. Any fan of music should have this record. Driving in your car. seducing your girlfriend. House Party. Heartbreak. getting ready to go out. The album covers all these bases and more. Soon after this album they split up. They didnt release a third and so the mysticism will live on forever. Be a part of it.

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          18.09.2001 03:12
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          The Second coming was quite a radical departure from the First Album, and this probably accounts for the majority of Roses fans being dissapointed when it was first released. I think this was to be expexted though, since the lads had grown up a lot since the late 80's. I feel the emphasis had shifted away from Ian Brown, and towards John Squire and it is him who takes the lead in many of the songs on the album, with his impressive guitar riffs. The album needs to be listened to in it's own right, not being constantly compared to their original masterpiece. There seems to be much hatred from many people towards John Squire, blaming him for the break up of the Stone Roses etc, but if people would forget about all that and listen to the album, they will see that it is one of the greatest albums of all time. OK, i'm going a bit over the top, but listening to the album with an open mind makes you realise that maybe it wasn't so bad after all.

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            25.08.2001 05:59
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            • "and errr.. not the first album"

            I remember the heartbreak. Buying this album and listening to it and realising that the silvertone masterpieces were at an end. I remember only liking Tears on the whole album. then my mate borrowed the CD about 3 years later and played it to death. After one week I was clling him a tasteless old git. He should have been playing the first album. After 2 weeks i was thinking, hmm Daybreak is OK, like the guitar. then it was, ten storey love songs got a decent intro. OK and I like Breaking Into heaven when it finally gets going. After a month or two Im getting it. The whole album has got something. It takes time and it might not be for all fans of the first album but its still got something. 2 years later and I can really enjoy most tracks on this album. Of course its not the first album or indeed any of the silvertone recordings but I would encourage anyone with a dusty old copy to give it a month or two. The guitar work is out of this world and the drumming is mesmerising. Ians vocals are Ians vocals and we wouldnt have them any other way. Great albums have to have great songs and a sense of time place and history. They have to mark the upward surge or peak of a career. This album could only ever be on a downslope but the great songs are there. It just take longer to tune in than I realised at first. During this very poor period of current musical offerings by todays bands, I would encourage everyone to invest a little time and patience. Its worth it. 4 stars or 5 stars. I think I'll go for 5 stars just because of the awsome Tears.

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              13.07.2001 06:02
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              After you've written one of the best albums ever, it's always going to be a tad tricky producing a follow up that pleases everybody. Suffice to say that with Second Coming, The Stone Roses didn't. I'm one of the seemingly rare people that has a lot of affection for it however. More than an acceptable quota of average tracks, I'll admit, but Paul Weller's been making a career out of that for years, so you shouldn't be too harsh. Breaking Into Heaven kicks off proceedings. Eventually. I'm not quite sure why there's 4 and a half minutes of strange jungle sounds preceding the main action, but after the first listen and thought of "oooh - it's nonedescript jungle noise", you like me will almost certainly be lunging for fast forward. Shame really, as it's a great song that could have really started the album with a roar if they'd thought it through a little better. First thing that hits me from the opener is how Ian Brown was starting to use his voice in a more threatening way - the wafer-thin enunciation of their debut seemed to have acquired an edge to it which really seemed to have real menace behind it. Forget about songs like Driving South, Straight To The Man, Tightrope, Good Times and How Do You Sleep - nothing there that you can't find somewhere within the canons of Bon Jovi and Bryan Adams if you feel that way inclined, while the slightly better Your Star Will Shine is still well down in quality terms on what The Roses could do almost effortlessly 5 years earlier. The singles - Love Spreads, Ten Storey Love Song and Begging You are all brilliant, however, and continued The Roses run of great 45s. The latter in particular is a great kind of fuzzy techno-rock which predated the formula The Prodigy used to great success by a good few years. Love Spreads too is a wonderful showcase of how accomplished they were as a collection of musicians - also highlighted to outstanding effect in the unfairly d
              erided Tears. Best bit of the album for me however is the double-bill of tracks 3 and 4 - Ten Storey Love Song and Daybreak. The former is a simply gorgeous and almost self explanatory towering love song which many writers since The Roses split hold up as the last great thing they produced. On the album, it segues in a really cool way into the great Mani bass intro to Daybreak - which for the first half is a really funky blues number with some of the best drumming Reni ever committed to record. After a couple of verses, the song turns into a rather soulless jam, but by then the foot's already tapping. There's a completely (intentionally) laughable hidden track which I'll spare comment on, but for the sort of money the album seems to sell for these days, 6 or 7 at least very good songs represents pretty good value - particularly if you can find it for the right side of a fiver (HMV and Virgin in particular often have it for £4.99). At least 3 songs on the album are classic Roses tunes that anyone with any interest in the band should own, and who knows? You may find something in some of the other tracks that no reviewers at the time seemed to hear.

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                18.10.2000 19:57
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                Slaggin, slagging, slagging and a bit more slagging. That's all this album recieved on its long awaited release a few years back. Is it justified? Well, yes, if you wanted a replica of the stunning debut album, but The Second Coming wisely does not try to be so. It's got a lot of teh same ingredients, just in a different, more carefree order. Any album that opens with a four minute collage of jungle-sounds can't be bad anyway. There are the famous stand-outs (Ten Storey Love Song, Love Spreads, Tears) which please every time, but there are also the slightly dodgier ones which creep up on you when you least expect it (usually after about teh third or fourth listening) and say "You love me!" (Begging You, Driving South, How do you sleep?) Overall, a good solid listen. Not for everyone, but great all the same.

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                23.09.2000 06:31
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                The best tracks are splendid and the rock swagger of Love Spreads and Breaking Into Heaven or the sprightly Ten Storey Love Song are as good as the best of their debut. But there are longueurs aplenty. Squire dominates and, yes, if rock still had guitar heroes he'd be the natural inheritor of Eric Clapton and Jimmy Page's mantle. But there's too much of him and Brown's voice is too frail for the accompanying noise. Which brings us to the horrors of the free live EP recorded in Ireland. Four perfunctory tracks played with precision (if not verve) but rendered ridiculous by Brown's comically bad vocal performance. This may not have been his fault, perhaps there was some technical bug at play, but the result is pathetic.

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                13.09.2000 06:50
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                I am mainly writing this in response to other peoples opinions. I was a latecomer to the world of The Stone Roses, having previously decided (much to my annoyance) that I wouldnt like that kinda thing. Well I bought The Second Coming in a sale, amd it remains as one of my favourite albums. I heard it before getting the eponymous album, which meant I was less biased against it I suppose. I enjoy 'Breaking into heaven' a lot, in spite of its rather cliche 'sweet child of mine' phrases. The intro is fine, I'm not sure what the complaints are all about, and every time I listen to it I hear some extra little bit. And they still maintain their mad boys image throughout, althoug I have to say some of the softer songs, like 10 storey lovesong, are a little bit of a let down. A lot of people disagree with me on that, but I'll stick to my guns. I find it very difficult to compare The Stone Roses and The Second Coming, mainly because they are just so different to my naive ears. In the second coming they seemed so much older, more sure of themselves (strange as that may sound - yes I am still talking about the roses), and there was a really differnet syle and finish involved in each. I love The Stone Roses for its slightly less manufactured sound, but I think my CD player enjoys the second coming more.

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                  12.09.2000 02:57

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                  The Second coming was quite a radical departure from the First Album, and this probably accounts for the majority of Roses fans being dissapointed when it was first released. I think this was to be expexted though, since the lads had grown up a lot since the late 80's. I feel the emphasis had shifted away from Ian Brown, and towards John Squire and it is him who takes the lead in many of the songs on the album, with his impressive guitar riffs. The album needs to be listened to in it's own right, not being constantly compared to their original masterpiece. There seems to be much hatred from many people towards John Squire, blaming him for the break up of the Stone Roses etc, but if people would forget about all that and listen to the album, they will see that it is one of the greatest albums of all time. OK, i'm going a bit over the top, but listening to the album with an open mind makes you realise that maybe it wasn't so bad after all.

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                  24.08.2000 20:17
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                  It starts oddly, with "Breaking into heaven" an 11 minute piece, with ambient jungle noises - certainly not like the guitar-laden gems the Stone Roses are famous for. The overall tone of the first half of the album is more like the Happy Mondays. As far as I am concerned it is not until "Begging you" (Song #7) that anything makes me feel like it's worth listening, and after that things improve a little. The beginning of "Tightrope" just sounds like a Sunday School choir, heart not really in it. "Good times" grooves along quite nicely, and "Tears" is quite nice in a "Stairway to heaven" kind of way. The last two tracks, "How do you sleep?", the album's best song, and "Love spreads", with its Hendrix-style guitar, bring to mind the Roses' earlier, more tuneful days. There is an extra track, 6 minutes long, but it's not really the wait (sounds a bit like Lieutenant Pigeon's "Mouldy old dough") If you liked the Stone Roses dance tracks better than their jangly pop, or if you like the Happy Mondays, it's probably OK, otherwise I wouldn't bother with it.

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                  13.07.2000 00:06

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                  The Second Coming disappointed a lot of people when it first came out. They didn?t like the overly guite laden sound which was reminiscent of Led Zepellin. They thought that John Squire had got too big for his boots and was monopolizing the whole sound. It appears that even people from within the group thought this. I really like the album though. ?Breaking into heaven? is a classic first album song. Surely a Roses speciality. Tears is a brilliant relationship song and Love Spreads is a classic ?get a placing in the chart song? and I love it.

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                  12.07.2000 20:35

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                  Second Coming does not deserve the slagging off it sometimes gets. I even know some people who prefer this to the first album. If you are a Roses fan you should definitely buy second coming and give it a while to grow on you. Ten Storey Love Song is the song you'll probably like the most at first as it sounds more the like the material o the first album. After a few listens though you should learn to appreciate great tracks such as Love Spreads, Begging you etc.

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                  28.06.2000 16:32
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                  Was it it worth the wait and the endless bickering? Probably not. The album starts off well enough with the sonic guitar fest of "Breaking into heaven", and peaks with the tuneful "Ten story love song", which hinted at a more tuneful past. Unfortunately the is too much self indulgence from John Squire, whose exquisite guitar solos take up too much time. It was as if he was conducting a materclass. The album is very different to the first one, more distored guitar, and even programmed drum loops on "Begging you", the the overall effect is a poor mans Led Zepplin. A shame, an album that promised everything, and delivered very little.

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              • Product Details

                Disc #1 Tracklisting
                1 Breaking Into Heaven
                2 Driving South
                3 Ten Storey Love Song
                4 Daybreak
                5 Your Star Will Shine
                6 Straight To The Man
                7 Begging You
                8 Tightrope
                9 Good Times
                10 Tears
                11 How Do You Sleep
                12 Love Spreads
                13 Foz