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Sound Of White Noise - Anthrax

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3 Reviews

Genre: Hard Rock & Metal - Speed Metal & Thrash / Artist: Anthrax / Audio CD released 1993-05-20 at Warner

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    3 Reviews
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      26.01.2012 11:45
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      It's not a brilliant album. Some good songs, some good vocals, but that's where it ends.

      "Sound of White Noise" is the 6th studio album by American thrash metal band, Anthrax. It was released in 1993 on Elektra Records and produced by the band with Dave Jerden. The line-up for the album was John Bush (vocals), Dan Spitz (guitar), Scott Ian (guitar), Frank Bello (bass) and Charlie Benante (drums).

      When an established band such as Anthrax loses its vocalist, it often has repercussions that are never good and the band is never the same. It can recover early on in its career, but will struggle to do so in their heyday. When Bruce Dickinson left Iron Maiden in 1993 and when Ozzy Osbourne was fired from Black Sabbath in 1978 stick out in my mind, as well as a year before this album was released when Anthrax took the step of relieving Joey Belladonna of his vocal duties and hiring former Armored Saint singer, John Bush, to replace him.

      Course this is 2012 and all three respective vocalists are back with their bands, but let's go back to 1993 for a moment with "Sound of White Noise". John Bush is a different style of vocalist than that of Joey Belladonna, and I can't imagine Joey singing many songs on this album, with the exception of "Only", which seems to be a crowd favourite.

      As it turns out, John Bush does a good job on the album, but musically, it's a 'softer' Anthrax. Gone are the crunching guitars replaced with the still heavy metal sound, but lacking an edge, Benante's drums, too, are also of a slower tempo. What could be said is this was Anthrax for a younger generation.

      Quality-wise, the majority of songs are very good. The above-mentioned "Only" being the stand out track with its catchy chorus and Bush shows why he was the man for the job. "Potter's Field" has a grungy style to it which a lot of hardcore fans didn't like at the time, and questioned the band's direction. Dan Spitz also questioned it and left the band shortly afterwards to become a watch maker.

      "Room For One More" has a catchy chorus, but again, it's hard to understand where the band was going musically, while the same can be said for "Invisible" and "Hy Pro Glo", which aren't bad songs but just not what you'd associate with one of the 'Big 4' of thrash metal. Then we come to "Black Lodge" and the album falls apart. Anthrax doing a ballad just doesn't work as far, and it's a cringeworthy attempt at attracting a new breed of fan.

      In summary, Metallica had changed style in the early 1990s, and it seemed Anthrax followed suit with "Sound of White Noise". Both bands were never the same again, but where Metallica gained a new generation of fans, Anthrax couldn't quite manage it and spiralled even further downward. As previously stated, there are some good songs on here, but it doesn't warrant what the band tried to achieve. Thumbs down from me.

      1. Potter's Field
      2. Only
      3. Room For One More
      4. Packaged Rebellion
      5. Hy Pro Glo
      6. Invisible
      7. 1000 Points of Hate
      8. Black Lodge
      9. Sodium Pentothal
      10. Burst
      11. This is Not an Exit

      My rating: 5/10

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      16.02.2009 23:35
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      John Bush reinvigorates classic band

      Much as been made of the introduction of John Bush into Anthrax, and the 'grungeification' of their sound. Piffle. John Bush ended up being twice the singer Joey Belladonna ever was, and on this , Anthrax sound like a hungry young band again.

      Opener 'Potters Field' kicks like a mule (Industrial band Ministry eventually remixed an even harder version of the song), the first single 'Only' (Which most of the grunge comments were aimed at) is one of the melodically strongest the band has ever recorded

      Whilst the speed which was evident in the early part of their career has diminished, they have replaced it with a more muscular edge, evident on chunky mid point songs 'Hy Pro Glo' and 'Invisible' (Which still has some of their old fashioned thrashiness about it)

      The ballad 'Black Lodge' is the biggest departure for the band here, a reverb soaked tale linked to 'Twin Peaks. 'Sodium Pentathol' and 'Burst' are two superbly aggressive songs, packed with melody.

      The album album with 'This is Not an Exit' which starts off at a slow pace, before introducing a monster riff, and finally thrashes right out of the 'Exit' door and down the road

      The doubters may still not be convinced by this album, but personally this is the equal of 'Among the Living' and a fine example of how melodic metal should be.

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      23.01.2008 21:10
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      Anthrax's sixth album (1993).

      It was a disappointing inevitability that Anthrax would follow the trend of their thrash contemporaries in the early-to-mid nineties and drastically alter their sound to something less intense, more hard rock influenced and ultimately more in line with the popular grunge movement, but unlike other sell-out releases that still managed to be surprisingly good ('Metallica,' 'Countdown to Extinction,' 'The Ritual'), there really is nothing to praise about this album. 'Sound of White Noise' is competent nineties hard rock that never escapes sounding distinctly like a sub-par Alice in Chains or Stone Temple Pilots, and is the clear point of slump in the Anthrax discography that would never recover.

      It seems that in attempting to match the heavy sound of the previous 'Persistence of Time,' all melodic elements derived from classic heavy metal that formed such an essential and distinctive part of the Anthrax sound have been completely excised, which robs the band of its identity and leaves no clue that this is the same band, something exacerbated by the firing of talented but allegedly unreliable singer Joey Belladonna and his replacement with John Bush. Bush's arrival didn't necessarily have to be like this, a low grunge croak in the style of Kurt Cobain, as he had already displayed considerable talent with a wide range in the early Armored Saint albums, but of course that would be incompatible with the band's new, bland-nineties sound.

      I don't have anything against Alice in Chains and those bands who enjoyed such a boom of popularity in the early nineties (indeed, they did a great service in finally putting an end to hideous glam metal acts), but this same popularity expanded to engulf these artists who were continuing to perfect their metal sound just as metal became distinctly unpopular, and that's a real shame. The problem with this album in particular is that it's completely boring and is nothing more than a shameful attempt to fit in with the new scene, something that must have disappointed many long-time fans who were accustomed to the band's formerly independent, "we're Anthrax and we take no sh*t" attitude. Dan Spitz and Scott Ian churn out unmemorable, tediously rhythmic riffs that have none of the usual Anthrax excitement, and the only real member to continue pulling his weight is drummer Charlie Benante, though his more energetic drums often sound at odds with the rest of the music.

      As expected for such a commercially-oriented album, it's the tracks released as singles that end up being the most memorable, though no better than the rest of the album: 'Only' for being the peak of Alice in Chains similarity, 'Room for One More' for sounding like a direct continuation of Bush's previous band Armored Saint where they left off with the similarly mediocre 'Symbol of Salvation' album, and the dull ballad 'Black Lodge' that doesn't even offer a cheap thrill to Twin Peaks fans by referencing the series explicitly in its lyrics, if it's even about it at all (considering the band's customarily limited pop-culture horizons, it seems likely for the early nineties). If this was any other band it would probably be worth three stars, but it's a horribly rapid deterioration for Anthrax that doesn't stand up to the test of time.

      1. Potters Field
      2. Only
      3. Room For One More
      4. Packaged Rebellion
      5. Hy Pro Glo
      6. Invisible
      7. 1000 Points of Hate
      8. Black Lodge
      9. C11 H17 N2 O2 S Na
      10. Burst
      11. This Is Not an Exit

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  • Product Details

    Disc #1 Tracklisting
    1 Potter's Field
    2 Only
    3 Room For One More
    4 Packaged Rebellion
    5 Hy Pro Glo
    6 Invisible
    7 1000 Points Of Hate
    8 Black Lodge
    9 C11 H17 N2 O2 S Na (Sodium Pentathol)
    10 Burst
    11 This Is Not An Exit