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Urban Hymns - The Verve

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Genre: Indie Rock & Punk - Britpop / Artist: The Verve / Audio CD released 1997-09-29 at Hut

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      26.03.2010 20:59

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      buy this album

      The Verve's record 'Urban Hymns' is their best selling and most loved album. I also think that it is a top class album and upon listening to it you will fall in love with a new band.

      This album contains the verves most well known and best loved songs, Sonnet, the drugs dont work, lucky man and bitter sweet symphony. And while these songs are beautiful and almost musical perfection both musically and lyrically. My personal favourite is 'The drugs dont work' i think the lyrics are beautiful and richard ashcrofts vocals are hauntingly beautiful, simply a masterpiece.

      But these 4 songs are often as far as some people get with this album when their is so much more to be discovered. This album is so much more than that. The depth on this album is truly outstanding with every song in the contents being a winner. I think special mentions go to the tracks, Neon wilderness, Catching the Butterfly and Rolling People. All of these songs are truly outstanding and help to make the album what it is.

      This album is highly regarded and is often cited as one of the greatest albums ever made. It is certainly in my top twenty albums of all times. Musically and lyrically this album just works and works together in harmony throughout. You should have no hesitation, just buy this album.

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      31.05.2009 22:06
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      If you skip a few songs, this is an excellent listen

      Well as I'm reviewing my favorite albums I can hardly leave this one out can I. This one gets up there in many people's Top tens. Not sure if it quite makes mine. I took me along time to get into the Verve and by the time I bought this album I had heard all the hype and was expecting something amazing. It was very good, don't get me wrong. But maybe not just as good as I was expecting! So this is what I make of the music;

      1. Bitter Sweet Symphony - A masterpiece, quite simply. This has to be one of the most well known songs in British history, soon as that iconic violin kicks in, you know your in for a treat. Awesome! 10/10

      2. Sonnet - I do like this song alot! Very simple, has a nice chilled out vibe. Very good. 9/10

      3. The Rolling People - Bit of a weird start to this one. Is ok, but I never quite 'got' this song. 6/10

      4. The Drugs Don't Work - People rave about this song. People say it's there best work. And it is quite beautiful. But come on! It's depressing as Hell!! I just wanna be that cat in the bag, waiting to drown!! Sorry but I hate this song!! 5/10

      5. Catching The Butterfly - Another unusual song. Real spaced out kind of feel to it. Don't mind this one to much. 7/10

      6. Neon Wilderness - Bonkers! I just don't get it. Maybe if I was on acid back in the 90's I would. But I'm not, so this is just tripe! 3/10

      7. Space And Time - That's better. Back to normailty. A really good solid song. Typical Verve sound, not to heavy just pleasent. Some good lyrics as well make this a decent offering! 8/10

      8. Weeping Willow - Now this I like! A really good upbuilding song. 9/10

      9. Lucky Man - Another classic. Such a simple set of chords to make a briliant song. 'Happyness, more or less, it's just a change in me, something in my liberty'. Repeat till you smile from ear to ear!! One of the Verve's really classic songs. 10/10

      10. One Day - A slow song, quite a nice one. Certainly not to the standard of Lucky Man, but still a good song. 8/10

      11. This Time - Good again, but not great. Another slightly off the wall kind of song, but they get away with it this time. 7/10

      12. Velvet Morning - Excellent song. Really slow start and it builds up nicely. Well done! 9/10

      13. Come On - Why didn't they end on Velvet Morning? Well they didn't. This song is ermmmm, a wracket? Can imagine them playing this live at festivals back in the 90's and people just going bonkers. But on an album its just not very good. 6/10

      Overall there are some flashes of genious on this album. But there is also some real weird crazy music! Maybe I'm getting old but this is just not as good as I was led to believe. So a good album, but not a great album.

      Overall I would give it 8/10

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        07.12.2008 22:48
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        a modern day classic

        Perhpas my favourite album of all time. This is one monster of an album and finally the point where The Verve went from being nearly men to bona fide stars. This was in part thanks to the first single being the incredible bittersweet symphony and its now distinctive and iconic video - Singer Richard Ashcroft walking down the street, knocking people over.

        Musically, the album takes its cue from a number of influences but never falls under the weight of any of them and could only be described in sound as being that of the verve. There are heavy jams such as The rolling people and Catching the butterfly. There are gorgeous ballads such as the drugs don't work and sonnet. This album is really the verve at the peak of their musical powers.

        If you haven't heard some of the singles from this album, then where have you been for the last decade. If that is somehow the case, I would suggest if you like your music deep, serious and in the vein of some of the heaviest rock groups of all times then you must check this out.

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          23.11.2008 19:30

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          *****

          Urban Hymns is The Verve's answer to What's The Story Morning Glory - and while the two albums have their differences what's important is that they are both very good. While Urban Hymns doesn't have the swagger and glamour of the latter, it manages to fuse together classic Brit rock with layered guitar and the odd burst of symphony to create a unique mesmeric sound.

          Of course, no album is complete without a generous helping of hits, of which there are many including the anthemic and symphonic Bitter Sweet Symphony, the catchy Sonnet and the ballad The Drugs Don't Work - all of that within the first half hour! Weeping Willow is too a wonderful track which is often overshadowed and for me it eclipses Velvet Morning which says a lot about the album.

          Perhaps it was a wise move by the band to take such a break after they'd archived so much success - something which Oasis should have done in my opinion.

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          11.01.2007 20:04
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          Extraordinary

          A perfect mash up of their first two albums, Urban Hymns achieves what it seems The Verve set out to accomplish in the first place. A seamless blend of psychedelic , space rock, and mainstream pop, Urban Hymns takes the best stands of its predecessors to create a near perfect album. The only possible misstep here could be One Day, which is a bit too sentimental for its own good, but it's redeemed quickly by the tremendous hard rockers Come On and the Rolling People. Overall, not quite a masterpiece, but as close as any band came to creating one during the 90's.

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          18.11.2001 15:18
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          The Verve were a magnificent band, and A Northern Soul is a twentieth century masterpiece. But this... This album is a let down. For two weeks as an 18-year-old, this album ruled my life, but now... The events surrounding its release were more a part of that euphoria than the actual music. Urban Hymns is bereft of the passion, the anger, the utter inability to compromise that made A Northern Soul so staggeringly good. Instead we get an over-produced, slick piece of target-market mush, shiny and empty. Posturing over passion, dull singer-songwriter tedium over explosive, expressive inter-band telepathy. Richard Ashcroft, over the course of The Verve's three albums literally pushed Nick McCabe out of the band's sound, his amazing, evocative guitar work becoming steadily lower in the mix, until Ashcroft even took over songwriting duties. Sonnet over Drive You Home? Rolling People over Life's An Ocean? I think not. Bittersweet Symphony remains a staggering accomplishment, but it has been raped by its own success, and there is too much dull, lifeless journeyman filler on thsi album. Velvet Morning over Stormy Clouds? No, no, NO. Even when they do try and loose the shackles of Ashcroft's mediocre songwriting, such as on Come On, they never cut loose, they never indulge, they never throw caution out and make merry hell. Where's the sonic excess? It died a death in favour of commercially acceptable schmaltz and monotony. I haven't listened to this album all the way through in over two years. A Northern Soul is rarely away from my hi-fi.

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          08.10.2001 20:26
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          It's amazing how both the press and musical press makes heroes out of individuals one minute and then drop them the next. All this, of course, happened to The Verve. It's called hype and it works in both positive and negative ways. What the music press forget however, is the fact that if a band is in any way good, then people forget the hype and the murmurs and buy and listen anyway. All this, of course, happened to The Verve. It's easy on a record like this to pick out the obvious 'stronger' tracks. Bitter Sweet Symphony could only ever really be the opening track and would stand out like a sulky, sultry sore thumb if it were relegated to track five down the pile. Symphony, as it is and leading the pack, is regal and majestic and all the things that a track written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards would, should (and could) be. At the same time you will remark to yourself the impossibility of The Rolling Stones recording anything similar to this, without Ashcroft's nonchalant interpretation it would never work. Surprising observation number one. The other tracks you'll listen out for will prove that this is not an album to be readily dismissed. Sonnet, standing at number two on the playlist, is a beautiful song of lingering, fragmented memories and is one of the few songs on the albums that treats Ashcroft as a voice rather than as a ‘frontman’ or public figure. Sonnet is a timeless classic, perhaps even more than Symphony is. It is hard not to fall in love with this one. Pure and simply. Track four, The Drug's Don't Work, is a slow tale of woe which is instantly grabbing. More than a tad depressing though, despite its sheer genius and sad beauty, you may find yourself working the remote and going forward - unless you've had a really bad day of course. Lucky Man is another uplifting crescendo on here. As a modern, edgy and upbeat ballad it works the vocal
          s and melody that Ashcroft is capable of, and along with Sonnet proves itself as one of the finest songs on the album. It's unfortunately true that a lot of individuals place this record on the 'hype' pile - for better or for worse. It really shouldn't be so. Other album tracks like Catching The Butterfly, One Day, This Time and Velvet Morning are capable of giving out some classic, urban, creative pleasure-vibes and glinting grooves to any staunch music critic. Buy it for the better tracks and you know what they say - don't believe the hype.

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            04.10.2001 02:46
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            This album is special. 'The Drugs don't Work' is the finest song penciled for my generation and certainly the most powerful number one. It holds a timeless quality that is refreshing to hear in the current state of modern music. Just like Sinatra, Bacharach or Gaye - it will be heard and cherished by countless generations ahead of us. Elsewhere on the album, songs like 'Sonnet', 'Lucky Man', 'One Day' all carry an emotional weight that is unsurpassed by any contemporary songwriter alive today. But this album possesses a secret energy, a secret magic that only a band who have been through Hell & back can have. Richard's lyrics are as real as the empathy in his voice. They come from somewhere in him, somewhere from inside that many artists try to find, but ultimately fail. That seperates the geniuses from the rest of them. On this album, Richard is channelling all the power of experience and emotion onto pen & paper and while most of the focus is on love either lost or found, the results are magnificent. His soothing voice combined with Will Malone's sweeping string sections is a perfect and most of the time, a highly emotive combination. It has to be special when an album both simultaneously makes & breaks the band. Essential buy for anyone who really loves music.

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              08.09.2001 18:13
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              It's amazing how both the press and musical press makes heroes out of individuals one minute and then drop them the next. All this, of course, happened to The Verve. It's called hype and it works in both positive and negative ways. What the music press forget however, is the fact that if a band is in any way good, then people forget the hype and the murmurs and buy and listen anyway. All this, of course, happened to The Verve. It's easy on a record like this to pick out the obvious 'stronger' tracks. Bitter Sweet Symphony could only ever really be the opening track and would stand out like a sulky, sultry sore thumb if it were relegated to track five down the pile. Symphony, as it is and leading the pack, is regal and majestic and all the things that a track written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards would, should (and could) be. At the same time you will remark to yourself the impossibility of The Rolling Stones recording anything similar to this, without Ashcroft's nonchalant interpretation it would never work. Surprising observation number one. The other tracks you'll listen out for will prove that this is not an album to be readily dismissed. Sonnet, standing at number two on the playlist, is a beautiful song of lingering, fragmented memories and is one of the few songs on the albums that treats Ashcroft as a voice rather than as a ‘frontman’ or public figure. Sonnet is a timeless classic, perhaps even more than Symphony is. It is hard not to fall in love with this one. Pure and simply. Track four, The Drug's Don't Work, is a slow tale of woe which is instantly grabbing. More than a tad depressing though, despite its sheer genius and sad beauty, you may find yourself working the remote and going forward - unless you've had a really bad day of course. Lucky Man is another uplifting crescendo on here. As a modern, edgy and upbeat ballad it works the vocal
              s and melody that Ashcroft is capable of, and along with Sonnet proves itself as one of the finest songs on the album. It's unfortunately true that a lot of individuals place this record on the 'hype' pile - for better or for worse. It really shouldn't be so. Other album tracks like Catching The Butterfly, One Day, This Time and Velvet Morning are capable of giving out some classic, urban, creative pleasure-vibes and glinting grooves to any staunch music critic. Buy it for the better tracks and you know what they say - don't believe the hype.

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                08.09.2001 18:11
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                It's amazing how both the press and musical press makes heroes out of individuals one minute and then drop them the next. All this, of course, happened to The Verve. It's called hype and it works in both positive and negative ways. What the music press forget however, is the fact that if a band is in any way good, then people forget the hype and the murmurs and buy and listen anyway. All this, of course, happened to The Verve. It's easy on a record like this to pick out the obvious 'stronger' tracks. Bitter Sweet Symphony could only ever really be the opening track and would stand out like a sulky, sultry sore thumb if it were relegated to track five down the pile. Symphony, as it is and leading the pack, is regal and majestic and all the things that a track written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards would, should (and could) be. At the same time you will remark to yourself the impossibility of The Rolling Stones recording anything similar to this, without Ashcroft's nonchalant interpretation it would never work. Surprising observation number one. The other tracks you'll listen out for will prove that this is not an album to be readily dismissed. Sonnet, standing at number two on the playlist, is a beautiful song of lingering, fragmented memories and is one of the few songs on the albums that treats Ashcroft as a voice rather than as a ‘frontman’ or public figure. Sonnet is a timeless classic, perhaps even more than Symphony is. It is hard not to fall in love with this one. Pure and simply. Track four, The Drug's Don't Work, is a slow tale of woe which is instantly grabbing. More than a tad depressing though, despite its sheer genius and sad beauty, you may find yourself working the remote and going forward - unless you've had a really bad day of course. Lucky Man is another uplifting crescendo on here. As a modern, edgy and upbeat ballad it works the vocal
                s and melody that Ashcroft is capable of, and along with Sonnet proves itself as one of the finest songs on the album. It's unfortunately true that a lot of individuals place this record on the 'hype' pile - for better or for worse. It really shouldn't be so. Other album tracks like Catching The Butterfly, One Day, This Time and Velvet Morning are capable of giving out some classic, urban, creative pleasure-vibes and glinting grooves to any staunch music critic. Buy it for the better tracks and you know what they say - don't believe the hype.

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                  08.05.2001 04:04
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                  The Verve released Urban Hymns in 1997 to great reviews from the public and the critics. Three years on I still regularly listen to what I consider to be in the top 5 albums of the nineties. This was the follow up to “Northern Soul” and was released after the band had reformed. Bitter Sweet Symphony (Single) This is a great track to open the album with. It starts off quietly and builds up into a great tune that you can’t help humming along to. The lyrics are also great as they explain the problems that make life a “Bitter Sweet Symphony”. This is a tune that most people will recall and it’s a pity that The Verve lost all of the royalties because the Rolling Stones copyright owners sued them for using the strings from “The Last Time”. Sonnet Sonnet is another track that starts off quietly and builds up. Again it has a very catchy tune and a memorable chorus. This really is the secret of The Verve’s success in my opinion, similar to Travis, the first time you hear a song it is immediately familiar. The Rolling People This track is a bit more upbeat and is more of an album filler than a stand out track. It is still a very good track and it is not one that I ever skip past, it’s just not up to the excellent standard that a lot of the other tracks achieve. The Drugs Don’t Work (Single) This is a magnificent track. It is emotional and Ashcroft’s voice has seldom sounded better. It could be argued that it’s a depressing track but that wouldn’t do it justice. The fact that it got to number one in the charts is evidence of it’s popularity. Worth buying the CD for this track alone. Catching the Butterfly The pace picks up again with this track. It is another Verve sounding track in that it is instantly recognisable as one of their songs. Another that I would say is more of an album
                  filler as it rambles along. Neon Wilderness This is another track that rambles along. It is one of the poorer ones on the album. It is the only track that I regularly skip past. A bit of a disappointment but I suppose there is always at least one weak link on any album. Space and Time The album immediately jumps back to the heights it was previously at with this superb track. It is a personal favourite and I would have liked to have seen how it would have got on if it had been released as a single. Weeping Willow This is another standard album track which is very enjoyable if you like The Verve sound. It is another that is easy to sing along to. Lucky Man (Single) This may well turn out to be the last release from The Verve. It is a fitting finale to any band. The track is a lot more positive than the rest and it gets used a lot on TV as the tune is very recognisable and popular. Another excellent track. One Day Back to the more downbeat after the sole uplifting track! This is another track that is very enjoyable and easy to listen to. This Time This is a different type of sound for the Verve and it works. There is a lot going on in the song which can prove to be a distraction but it is another high quality track. Velvet Morning This would be the best track on any other album. It is an excellent track that is quiet throughout the verses and builds up to the chorus. Come On I imagine this must be a fantastic song to hear live. It is full of energy and is almost a rant from Ashcroft. A good way to close the album although this track could easily bring the parental warning for some of the lyrics. The Title was one that impressed me. Fellow dooyooers will know how difficult it is to come up with an apt title. Although The Verve had a lot longer to come up with a title than we do it is still an
                  excellent title that captures the album. It is a pity that The Verve have split up as this CD leaves you wanting more. However, given their past, another reformation may not be out of the question. Thankfully Ashcroft is now producing solo material but I prefer the sound of The Verve. If you don’t have this CD I would recommend buying it immediately as it is a truly great album.

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                    08.05.2001 02:12
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                    In British music 1997 was the year of The Verve, atleast in terms of popularity (Radiohead's far better 'OK Computer' was overshadowed) that made dents in the year due to mainly two classic singles, a interest from the press who previously didn't care before, and a history that was finally coming to and end - permanently. Apart one split before, The Verve reformed plus one new member and delivered the Chris Potter and Youth (Killing Joke) produced 'Urban Hymns'. You must've been in a coma in '97, if you hadn't heard of anything about this album. This is the last Verve album, probably ever now. The thing that first attracted me to The Verve was the album's debut single 'Bitter Sweet Symphony'. I thought it was a great song, and the video was brilliant too. I don't know about anybody else, but I remember '97 being a bad year, not a horrible year but if I was asked to define my '97 personally I couldn't say I enjoyed it (but I'm not gonna bore you with that Thom Yorke style misery!). I wonder if anyone did as '97 was quite a sullen or dark year for music. It was in the air. Anyway, this song seemed a good commercial soundtrack for the year, for many. Anyway, with interest in their number 2 single, I was then again impressed by 'The Drugs Don't Work' which reached number 1. I decided on splashing out on the album, but was somewhat miffed as the strong b-sides on the singles hinted that they must have a vast variety of good material, but I was wrong as the singles were better than the album which borders on being average. Needless to say the singles are good, 'Bitter Sweet...' sweeping strings and 'The Drugs...' slide guitar, but the lyrically uplifting 'Lucky Man' and the cheesy 'Sonnet' weren't as good. Things don't get better with the averagely satisfying piece of indie in 'The Rolling People'. It's
                    kind of like Primal Scream, but not as good, and 'Catching The Butterfly' is just cod chill-out Dad rock indie. I didn't expect The Verve to be just another average indie band particularly after the great singles, and investing in their other albums which were great, though it seemed The Verve declined as they began to progress. 'Neon Wilderness' is the album's arty moment, but it's not even that interesting, but funnily enough it's also probably one of the non-singles most interesting moments. Following this is more yawn on the chilled out old man guitar-isms of 'Space And Time', and then there's 'Weeping Willow' a song torn straight out the pages of a song book by Noel Gallagher - it has that familiar indie drum beat and swagger. And 'One Day' is more slow yawn. It's not a bad soundtrack to how you feel when you wake up, in a perfect mood (a rarity though as most of us are head-bombed in the morning). Yes, love is a great old thing but not when it's being applied to OAP's holding hands at Blackpool Pier. 'This Time' though isn't bad, another alright song with it's smooth rolly bass, shifty percussion, and textured guitar bits. 'Velvet Morning' is more acoustic folk vinyl-crackled-liked fodder. It's one of those kind of sullen moments that go a bit over the top that it's almost a joke. It's Radiohead's 'Exit Music (For A Film)' without the evident joke. Last song 'Come On' is not bad too (which means excluding the singles there's only 2/3 songs that are pleasing enough, barely) with it's authorative drum and bass foundations, Ashcroft's emotional rantings and passable guitar swagger - and ooh Ashcroft swears near the end of the song - "this is a big f*** you!" And to cap things off there's a pointless hidden sound segment of a baby crying over hymn music to
                    an urban soundscape - 'Urban Hymns' geedit? Maybe it was wise for The Verve to curtail themselves at this commercial peak to avoid tarnishment of their past. I admit I quite enjoyed this album for a bit, but looking back all I really did was play the singles, and so this is quite a poor album when it has to rely on it's singles. The best thing about 1997 Verve was their singles, the album isn't really worth the purchase of other 2/3 good enough songs. If you want to try the Verve at their best try the preceeding 'A Northern Soul' which was their at-the-time indie at their best, but their personal timeless best is their '93 debut 'A Storm In Heaven' (and Verve EP before this) which saw them as an almost completely different band. Good singles, a few good songs - it's not totally crap, but it's not even bordering near good. It borders below average - 2/5.

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                      09.12.2000 20:41
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                      When The Verve reformed, no-one really took any notice.....that was until they released the first single off Urban Hymns. Bittersweet Symphony has become The Verve's anthem, and when released was rightly hailed as a masterpiece. This album put The Verve up there with the best...rightly so, its nothing short of pure genius. Richard Ashcroft masterminds this musical masterpiece, and the album simply grows on you. With Lucky Man, Drugs Don't Work and the majestical Space and Time it can't fail to impress, and is a worthy follow up to A Northern Soul. They split again after this, but what a way to go out! Also it produced the solo career of Sir Richard Ashcroft which is no bad thing in my book. Worth buying for anyone....a timeless piece of quality that is rare in music today.

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                        01.12.2000 04:54

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                        Too much in debt to the nationless mythology of the Great Rock'n'Roll Band, and too intent on transcendence to qualify as anything other than citizens of the universe, The Verve are, at worst, Whole Lotta Love meets Fool's Gold through John Martyn's FX pedals. That good. At best (their enforced layoff after the A Northern Soul album allowed singer Richard Ashcroft to write songs not specifically reliant on his band's primordial soup), Urban Hymns rose to national anthem league, an appeal to a post-club generation who now use rock'n'roll as a comedown aid. Whether Ashcroft- a cheerleader for the magnificence of his band can cut it on his own is another matter entirely.

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                        10.11.2000 22:44

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                        This of course was thee album for the Verve. After years of not having big success this album broke the mould for them....and its definitely warranted... This album includes the hit singles Bitter Sweet Symphony, Lucky Man and the downbeat put brilliant The Drugs Don't Work. The album is very in the britpop mould, with lots of huitars sounds (but not that heavy), good basslines, and great rhythms. One of my favourites is The Rolling People which has a great mix of punch and mellow downbeat music. If you have ever liked any Verve stuff then this won't disappoint at all! It's just a shame that this is the last album ever from the Verve after the split which ensued soon after this cd.

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                    • Product Details

                      Disc #1 Tracklisting
                      1 Bittersweet Symphony
                      2 Sonnet
                      3 Rolling People
                      4 Drugs Don't Work
                      5 Catching The Butterfly
                      6 Neon Wilderness
                      7 Space And Time
                      8 Weeping Willow
                      9 Lucky Man
                      10 One Day
                      11 This Time
                      12 Velevet Morning
                      13 Come On
                      14 Deep Freeze