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Exmoor (Somerset)

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NATIONAL PARK. National Park Officer, Exmoor National Park Authority, Exmoor House, Dulverton, Somerset TA21 9HL. Tel: +44 (0)1398 323 665 Fax: +44 (0)1398 323 150 e-mail: info@exmoor-nationalpark.gov.uk

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      13.09.2010 15:08
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      Great Place

      Exmoor is a National Park situated in the South West of England. The majority of the park is in the county of Somerset although some of it crosses over into Devon. The park is on the Northern side of the counties and lies just below the Bristol Channel. Although Exmoor is not seen as a very large National Park it does contain areas such as the Brendon Hills, the Vale of Pollock and the East Lyn Valley. The area attracts thousands of visitors each year as this is an area of outstanding natural beauty.

      If you are wanting to visit Exmoor then there are a few towns in the area that have accommodation. Porlock and Lynton & Lynmouth are the largest settlements in the area and these have hotels and bed and breakfasts that are ideal for visitors. There are also lots of privately owned holiday homes in this area that are set in some wonderful surroundings and are ideal if you are looking for self catering accommodation. Camping is another popular option for somewhere to stay on Exmoor. The Halse Farm Caravan and Camping Site is set right in the heart of Exmoor and is surrounded by some great views. There is also the Westermill Farm Site which again has some great spots for camping and also a few holiday homes.

      Exmoor is made up of Sandstone, Gritstone, Slate, Limestone and Shale. Much of the area is moorland but a long 34 mile stretch of coastline also makes up part of Exmoor. At Culbone Hill the sea cliffs reach up to just over one thousand feet in height making these England's largest sea cliffs. There are also some nice beaches and lovely coves to explore along this stretch of coastline.

      The area is surrounded by myths and legends. Probably the most well known is of the beast of Exmoor. This is said to be a large cat like creature that stalks the moors and often preys on sheep and other large animals. There have been several reports of animals like Pumas or Leopards but as yet there has been no definite proof that such a beast exists.

      There moor has a rich history and there are lots of sites of significance in the area. The area is also very popular with walkers as there are some beautiful walks both along the coast and also up in the hills. One place worth a visit is Lynton & Lynmouth, here they have a Cliff Railway which takes you straight up the cliff that separates the two towns. There are also some lovely little shops and here and some nice places to eat out. The Valley of the Rocks is also a good place to see with some amazing rock formations that jut out into the sea.

      Exmoor really is one of England's most beautiful areas. There is so much to see and do in this area and so many great places to visit. If you have never had the chance to visit Exmoor then you really are missing out, next time you are heading for the South West make sure you go and give this National Park a visit.

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        13.09.2000 02:40
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        Exmoor is defined by the extent of the National Park which covers Somerset and Devon. It covers 265 square miles and inside these boundaries lie some of the finest countryside in England. Most of it is owned by the National Trust. There are about 10,000 people live there, most in small villages, and with only four places large enough to call a town. There are very few roads but there is 600 miles of public footpaths. The main character of it, is the Plateau's of red sandstone and slate on which it stands. The most spectacular scenery is on the coast, where the Plateau meets the sea, here is some of the most beautiful stretches of coastline you could wish to see. The moors are inland, including Exmoor Forest which is about 30 square miles, centred in Simonsbath in Somerset. It is full of wildlife including a hardy race of horned sheep, buzzards, wild red deer and the famous exmoor ponies.

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