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The Broads (Norfolk, Suffolk)

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The Broads are a network of mostly navigable rivers and lakes (known locally as broads) in the English counties of Norfolk and Suffolk. The Broads and some surrounding land was constituted as a special area with a level of protection similar to a national park by The Norfolk and Suffolk Broads Act of 1988. The Broads Authority, a Special Statutory Authority responsible for managing the area, became operational in 1989. The total area, the majority of which is in Norfolk, is 303 km², with over 200 km of navigable waterways. There are 7 rivers and about 50 broads, mostly less than 12 feet deep. Out of 50 or so broads, only 13 are generally open to navigation, with a further three having navigable channels. Some broads have navigation restrictions imposed on them in autumn and winter.

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      17.07.2010 19:00

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      discusting worst food in the UK

      LION INN, THURN, GREAT YARMOUTH
      My husband and i went to the Lion INN, Thurne,Norfolk to celebrate our wedding anniversary (16/07/2010) after looking at their website and promise of great food and well over 45 meals to choose from plus specials on the board, very deciving website and photos!
      The pub itself is in a lovely quiet norfolk village, next to moorings on the norfolk broads, we live in the area and love the broads and some off the brillient village pubs.
      BUT NOT THIS ONE! STAY AWAY !
      In reality it is a dirty rotten decaying building, damp smelling rotting dump. The food is TOTALY UN-EDIBLE, Choice limited, could not gaurentee nut-free(I am highly allergic to nuts and can die in minutes), and owner went very angry when we asked this question, a bit like Basil from faulty towers!!!!!! one special on board, mussles. we ordered a 16oz sirlion (no way was the meat sirloin) and asked to make sure lean. (REALITY- a peice of fat,grissle and bone, no way sirlion or any form of steak cut) Placed on top of chips, pre- cooked and warmed up greasy mess served cold, peas- THE SUPERMARKET VALUE TYPE, hard cold. Musrooms, greasy slimy and cold runny mess, side salad brown dead lettuce- thankfully one bit, 2 slices of cuecumber,DRY and curly, 1 cherry tomatoe cut in half, all sprinkled with dried parsley and grease drip stains, served with dirty cuttelry on a dirty wooded bar table. We also ordered the 12 oz sirlion and got the same UN-edible mess, ordered lean and rare, came thin, grissle and fat, burnt and cold at same time. Could not eat,this was so discusting I would not even give it to a DOG, proberly mke a dog very ill. The meal only took 4mins from ordering to arriving, very SUS? The management did know it was our Anniversay, did not care. NO REFUND, NO APOLLOGY. I asked where the ladies toilets were? I was told by a male member of staff not to use the ones in the bar area, as you'd be better off with the ones in the family room, used these and wondered just how bad the bar toiets must be as theese were dirty,dampwood broken skirting boards, no soap,loo roll and very smelly. Other dinesr soon left in discust, plenty of un-eaten meals. Tried a bite of the meat as i was very hungry, woke up this moring with chronic stomach pains and dioreah. Wish i'd had a camera to prove how bad this place really is, and maybe in hindsite for trading standards and food hygene reasons. STAY AWAY AT ALL COST YOUR HEALTH AND YOUR FAMILIES DEPEND ON THIS ADVICE. Out side area run down, cheap broken plastic furniture few old picnic bences. Rip off old arcade,type of shed selling newspapers,milk ect for boats, dirty showers ect. couple off very odd pool tables and dangerous play area in beer garden.
      This page requires me to give a star rating, it is un-fit to serve food at this pub it deserves no stars just a health warning and closing down. but to get this online i must give it 1.

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      04.08.2009 13:03

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      Go now, not next year or the year after as it will be spoilt by tourism

      These are found in the lovely county of Norfolk in England, and are a network of interlinked Rivers and lakes. These were formed as the lakes used to hold peat and are formed completely from man, and are linked together by the many channels that hold them.

      Tourist Attractions-
      On the broads you can hire motor cruisers to explore the area for yourself, these are available at Wroxham mainly as well as various other towns. You can also learn the art of sailing within them, or windsurfing with many sailing schools based around the broads waters, giving a complete edge to the attraction. There are also popular large boats that give guides to many tourists - these also leave from Wroxham.

      The general environment -
      The broads is very peaceful, tranquil and generally a lovely place to spend an afternoon. You can have as much fun walking down beside the riverbanks as you can have playing on a sailing boat. These are becoming slightly spoilt however, as litter becomes more popular along with the increasing tourist numbers - my solution? go now rather than later.

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      15.04.2004 17:39
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      Many thanks to Proxam for directing me to the correct place with my review. I shall get around to expanding this to a fuller Broads review in the future. well we fancied a holiday with a bit of a difference. i have wanted to go on a boating holiday since i was a kid and my husband enjoyed a boating holiday when he was younger so we thought we'd give it a go. we also have 2 children, girls aged 10 and 8, and as they like the outdoors and wildlife this type of holiday should suit us down to the ground (or water!). well i was tasked with finding a tour company and booking the holiday. my first stop was the web. i requested brochures from over 8 companies and only 2 sent them to me, one being blakes. now blakes web site is pretty good and easy to use but i do like to have a brochure when i'm choosing anything like this as i find them easier to use. so the brochure arrived and then we decided where we would like to go. well if you want to go boating anywhere in the uk then blakes will have a boatyard they use, from the grand union canal all the way up to the caledonian and more. well we decided on the norfolk broads. now blakes have 10 boatyards which they use scattered all over the broads. the brochure was very easy to use and had lots of choice of boat, varying from 2 berth all the way up to 12 and either cruiser or narrow boats. you can also choose between a typical broads style boat or a more cruiser type which is what we went for. they even supply sailing yachts with tuition for those with little or no experience. i chose a selection of motor cruisers which slept 4 to 6 people in 2 cabins and the saloon, which meant that my husband and i would have a cabin and the girls one too - ours was even en-suite! the information provided about the boats in the brochure is excellent and there is a layout diagram of the interior which was very accurate in our case. it was then a matter of contacting blakes by phone and finding out
      about availability - this can also be done online or by post, but i find a human voice more appealing. the staff at the other end of the phone were most helpful and the boat we had put as our second choice was available. I was able to pay by sending a cheque rather than by credit card as they saved the booking for 7 days - some companies insist on credit cards being used. I received a booking confirmation within 14 days of sending the deposit. I then needed to send the balance of payment 6 weeks before the holiday started. However, on the down side, no reminder is sent and although I remembered it would be easy for someone to forget and maybe jepordise their holiday. Blakes really then have little to do with the rest of the holiday. Bouancy aids are provided free of charge by the boatyard and they have a large variety of sizes. Everything is handled by the boatyard, who are all independent. Any problems which arise during the course of the holiday need to be referred to the boatyard and not to Blakes who have no reps as such other than the boatyard owners. We sailed from Barnes Brinkcraft in Wroxham and they were excellent and I would thoroughly recommend using them. Our weeks holiday cost around £1000 for 2 adults and 2 children. An extra 2 people could have come for the same cost but the boat would have been a little cramped. All in all an excellent value for money holiday and very relaxing - totally different from lying on a beach, although I haven't done that for a long time! Blakes are a good company to use. Their staff were very helpful and the brochure and website easy to use and understand. You can book your holiday yourself direct from home. If this type of holiday appeals to you then I would recommend you take a look at using Blakes Holiday Boating

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        02.11.2000 04:19
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        The Norfolk Broads are many things - beautiful, awe-inspiring, magical, unspoiled, bleak, brilliant, tranquil, inhospitable, commercialised, reassuring and breathtaking, to name but a few of their many moods. I've sat, fogbound, on the edge of Breydon Water, listening in vain for any sound other than the almost inaudible lapping of waves on the mud; woken early on a summer morning to find the water mirror-like as the last tendrils of mist burn away; spent rewarding days "scrub-bashing" to preserve wetland habitat; enjoyed cosy evenings in cabins lit by gas lamp; held my breath watching a marsh harrier over the reedbeds; sailed along a river at the end of the day watching an impossibly vivid sunset on one side of the boat and an equally brilliant moonrise on the other. Undoubtedly, it's a beautiful, special and unique place, a quiet, watery land with a different way of life and a history all its own, and very rewarding to explore. However, I've also spent days where it seems the skull-rattling throb of diesel engines will never stop; actually travelled in queues of boats strung along the river like cars on the M25; seen banks erode year on year due to the wash from speeding boats; seen wildlife killed by litter and discarded fishing tackle; spent time in the havens of tackiness which inevitably spring up wherever there are tourists. Can you avoid these elements? Yes, if you're careful. With a little planning and some responsible choices, you can improve the quality of your visit for yourself and others. Perhaps some background information will help put things in perspective... Location ---------- A triangle drawn between Norwich, Lowestoft and the village of Stalham will contain most of the Broads area. The river Bure, flowing through Wroxham and on to Yarmouth and with tributaries the Ant and Thurne, connects the northern broads; the Yare, which picks up the river Wensum just outsi
        de Norwich and flows to Yarmouth through the vast expanse of Breydon Water, has the southern broads; and the Waveney, coming up from Beccles, has only Lowestoft's Oulton Broad before also flowing through Breydon and out to sea at Yarmouth. The whole network contains over 200km of navigable, lock-free waterway. Brief history --------------- The Broads are not truly natural, but the result of digging for peat in the Middle Ages. As sea levels rose over time, the workings became flooded, creating the Broads, or shallow lakes, found today. The area has also been exploited for other natural materials, but now principally lives through tourism and agriculture. The area's potential attraction for tourists was first noticed in the late 19th century, and the industry has grown ever since, with the most noticeable facet being the provision of holiday boats. Today, boatyards abound, offering everything from surviving graceful wherries (traditional craft) to the latest electric boats, although most craft are of the long, blunt and above all ugly, diesel-engined type. Current problems arise from congestion on the waterways (and in the principal towns and villages) in the high season, runoff from farms and discharge from sewage works which contains nitrates and phosphates (causing excess algae and thus murky water), erosion of banks due to excess wash from boats, over-abstraction of water, and the threat of saltwater flooding from the nearby North Sea. These all contribute to the vulnerability of the area, something which is often far from the minds of holidaymakers. The area's regulatory body, the Broads Authority, do their best to raise awareness, but the sad fact is that many people simply don't care because they are only there for a week or so. What can I do? ---------------- Here are a few tips to make a broads holiday stress-free for you while reducing any impact on the environment. <
        br><br> 1) Take a little time to understand the area beforehand. Information on the broads is available from the Broads Authority, whose address is given on the main page of this category; most boat companies, B&Bs, etc. should also be able to send you leaflets when you book. A short while spent learning about the problems and issues of the area helps people to understand the reasons behind things like speed limits on the rivers, and hopefully encourages people to respect them! 2) Accept that it's a different pace of life. Half the pleasure of a broads holiday is the unhurriedness compared to daily life. Some people complain about only being able to travel at 5mph or so - in fact, as well as preserving the banks and wildlife, this speed allows you to look around and notice things that you might not otherwise, or just rest and chat or read. However, it might be wise to make sure children have plenty to keep them occupied, especially in case of bad weather (all too common!). Don't be too ambitious with your boating itinerary - check things like whether you really can make that mooring before dark if you're running against the tide. Be flexible, and be prepared. There are plenty of sources of information for people who are new to boating. 3) Respect the environment. It goes without saying that you shouldn't dispose of rubbish overboard, and many moorings have large bins for boat rubbish. But even "biodegradable" waste like banana peel can take longer to break down than you think, and may be harmful to some wildlife if eaten. And speaking of feeding wildlife, if you really want to feed the ducks (children always do!), it's better for them to feed them duck food (on sale in some places) than bread. Also, you often see crusts floating in the water, because the ducks are just too full to eat it all... this can begin to rot, and become harmful. Discarded fishing paraphernalia is still a pr
        oblem, although it is improving. The fine line and small pellets (thankfully not lead now) pose a real hazard to waterfowl and other river wildlife. Bank damage can occur through excessive wash from speeding boats, or from illegal mooring. The River Inspectors can fine you for both, incidentally. Damaged banks can lead to flooding, erosion of paths, and excess sediment in the water - a high price to pay for that extra 5mph or "pretty" berth for the night. 4) Respect other river users. Give respect and you'll receive it. There's a certain cameraderie among river users, and most people you meet will be friendly and courteous, willing to swap stories and give advice. As for the other minority, you just have to show them respect too and gain comfort from the moral high ground :) Remember that anglers, canoeists, and those in sailing and rowing dinghies all have as much right to use the river as those in motor cruisers, although a small minority of people don't seem to think so. Cruisers, as the most powerful and manoeuvrable craft, should usually give way to others. Also watch out for your wash when passing moored boats (think of spilled tea!), and perhaps most importantly, remember that sound carries well across water. Loud radios, even loud conversations, can be heard some distance away, and may be intruding on some other soul's quiet enjoyment. So keep your thoughts on that prat in the "Captain" hat to a whisper! 5) Make responsible choices where you can. Many boatyards offer electrically powered boats, or ones with special hull designs to minimise wash, available for hire for a day or longer. As well as having environmental benefits, they can provide you with a smoother and above all quieter ride, so are worth looking into. If you're tempted to get a day boat, think whether your needs could be accomplished by a trip on a tour boat. These pollute less per passenger, and you
        don't have to worry about navigating among the bigger boats, finding a place to moor, and so on. The commentaries are interesting too! Personally I detest the large Mississippi-style "paddle-boats" which ply their trade from one or two points; I think they are ugly, obtrusive, and out of keeping with the character of the area. The one benefit is that if you're actually on it, you can guarantee it won't spoil your photos! A luxurious, but rewarding, option is to take a trip on a wherry. These traditional boats, dating from the early 20th century, come with a skipper and have room for up to 12 people. It's travelling in the ultimate style, although hard work can also be involved (if you choose) in raising the huge single sail, and even "quanting" (like punting, but bigger) when the wind drops. You can charter wherries privately from a couple of companies, or in the summer they do a tour of day-trips around the broads. Although charters are expensive, the money raised goes to the boats' upkeep. These boats were my introduction to the broads area, on a school trip; they're the reason I fell in love with the place, and I would urge any visitor to at least try and see them, if not travel on them. Truly unique. 6) Do you want a land- or water-based holiday? Land-based holidays: accommodation is more spacious and less prone to the effects of weather (plus there's no need for sea legs :). You can explore the nearby coast and inland parts of the broads area - this is easiest with a car, but can be achieved to some extent with bikes and/or public transport in the summer. Water-based holidays: you can see many parts of the broads which are inaccessible from the road. Part of the beauty of it is getting away from all those cars! You do need to be sure that you like the people you go with, as you'll be in a confined space, and accommodation is generally basic. After a week on the water, you'll
        be rocking and rolling on dry land :) Both allow you to explore villages, towns, and the city of Norwich if you desire; pubs and restaurants of varying quality can be found on and off the river, as can tourist attractions such as nature reserves (e.g. How Hill) and steam railways (Bure Valley). It's probably worth consulting a map before going. My personal recommendations ----------------------------- My top five things to see and do in the area: - take a trip on a wherry. Trading Wherry Albion, Pleasure Wherry Hathor, and Wherry Yachts Olive and Norada all make regular appearances during the holiday season, for day, half-day and short trips. The boats are beautiful, and the skippers are very knowledgeable about their craft and the broads in general. Contact the Broads Authority for schedules of trips. - visit How Hill nature reserve. An environmental education centre, a small rural life museum, a working reedcutter (a person, not a machine!), and trips on their eco-friendly electric and solar powered boats, plus of course a nature trail through marsh and woodland, all make this a fascinating destination. If you're lucky, you'll see swallowtail butterflies and marsh harriers. - try the Rushcutters. A riverside pub on the outskirts of Norwich, although it's a chain (Chef & Brewer), the food is varied, generous, and top quality. A large riverside terrace and a riot of colour from hanging baskets make it an ideal pub for summer evenings - just don't mind the (very) occasional train passing by! - catch the Barton House railway (at Wroxham) if you can. Although it's open infrequently (it's operated by one of the wherry owners/skippers), this miniature railway is a delight to visit, and includes a full-size signal box. Children will love it, and all the money raised goes to charity. Information is available from the tourist information centre. - get remote! Head for Be
        rney Arms mill (English Heritage) - it's on the upstream end of Breydon Water, a mile from the railway halt of the same name and about four miles from the nearest road. There's a pub there too, and the mill contains exhibitions on its life as a water pump and cement grinding mill. The marshes surrounding it are wide and flat, the most open open space I've seen - they have an incredible sense of light and space, and glorious, huge skies. Please do visit this beautiful and interesting area, but at the same time be aware of its vulnerability and the delicate balance between tourism as a provider and as a potential destroyer. Thoughtful planning can help conserve the area for future visitors as well as helping you make the most of your visit. Enjoy yourself!

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          23.10.2000 02:38
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          The Norfolk and Suffolk Broads cover 80 square miles of watery wilderness, they have the same protected status as any National Park, they are enjoyed by millions of visitors every year. Wroxham is a popular centre for hiring boats to explore the Broads, but it can be very busy in the high summer,this little town also has a miniature railway, this is good if you have children. Hickling Broad has the largest expanse of water in Norfolk, there is also a nature reserve, where they have a nature trail, and if you like bird watching you can go in the bird watching hides. You can also see Britain's largest butterfly the Swallowtail here in the summer. If you want a holiday messing about on boats and taking life easy, then i would recommend a holiday here , as the scenery is beautiful especially the villages and the water pump windmills. It makes a nice change from the usual sea-side resorts.

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            22.09.2000 01:07
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            I'm quite lucky that I don't live a great distance from the broads. The broads cover an area of 80 square miles; the broads are home to mile upon mile of waterways. The whole area is quite, beautiful and just so natural. The area is also home to windmills, quite country lanes and delightful country inns. If you do fancy visiting I have listed some of the best places to visit in Norfolk. Wroxham is a bustling town situated on the river Bure. Wroxham is a popular place for hiring boats, on which you can explore the broads. Wroxham is extremely busy in summer. Whilst your there why not visit the Barton House Miniature Railway, it gives steam rides all throughout the season, kids will love it. Hickling Broad is the largest expanse of water in Norfolk, the broad also has a large nature reserve, this is run and maintained by the Norfolk naturalist's trust, they have provided a nature trail, and bird watching hides. This is one of the best reserves in the country; you may even spot Britain's rarest butterfly the swallowtail. Whilst your in Hickling visit the Pleasure Boat Inn it still has it's own landing stage. Ranworth is a good base to explore Ranworth and Cockshoot broads; both broads have nature trails. Ransworth has a conservation centre that floats; the reed-thatched building is reached by a walkway. Inside the centre provides a fascinating introduction to wildlife of the broads, and upstairs there is a gallery that provides excellent views. Another good view is from the tower of St Helens church. This church has one of the best preserved painted rood screens in the country. Beeston Hall is an 18th century mock Gothic country house that stands north of Hoveton and can be reached by foot from Barton Broad. Refreshments are served in the Orangery and there are plenty of woodland walks. There is so much to do and see in this area, it's a beautiful part of Britain. If you do fan
            cy going on holiday there, why not stay on a cruiser or even a floating house, it certainly makes a change from staying at a hotel.

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              17.09.2000 05:27
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              The Norfolk Broads have one attraction you won’t find in any brochure, why? Well it’s not something that you would associate with Boating or wildlife, the two most common reasons for visiting the broads. I am talking of Real Ale and its abundance in Norfolk and Suffolk, for here in deepest East Anglia the traditional English pint can be found in its natural habitat. With an easy to use, drinker friendly transport system there is no better place to go pint watching! There are two possible starting points assuming you wish to travel to the area by train (always recommended if drinking!), Norwich or my preferred option of Wroxham. Book yourself a comfy cruiser from one of the numerous boatyards and set sail in a southerly direction heading towards great Yarmouth. By now you are already deep into Adnams territory and a good pint of Southwold or Broadside can be found nesting in almost any local Inn, you can get really close, just moor your boat outside and approach the bar. But hidden deeper into the countryside is a real gem for Ale watchers, for on the opposite side of the river from the new Inn at Horning lies Woodbastwick the home of Woodfordes brewery and such classics as Wherry, nelsons and the unbeatable Norfolk Nog. There are several mooring opportunities as most punters head for the pubs on the riverbank leaving the far shore unloved, but it is only a 25 minute walk to Woodbastwick and the Fur and Feathers which is the brewery tap for Woodfordes. As well as the full range of ales and the brewery shop next door, the food is superb with “Norkie Pie” my firm recommendation. You will leave any evening in the fur and feathers with a slight sway in your step and no requirement for food for a good 12 hours! Setting off once more you can choose to head towards Sutton and Stalham, which both provide good pubs and Ales, but next I would suggest continuing thr
              ough Yarmouth and traversing Breydon Water. Once the other side you are heading for Suffolk and a choice of Norwich with a huge selection of CAMRA rated pubs or the understated town of Beccles, which has its fair share of gems. An unusual place is the White Swan Wine Bar, “Wine Bar!” I hear you shout, well yes it is a wine bar but serves bottled beers from around the world alongside Adnams Ales and Budvar from Czechoslovakia on tap! Finally my last tip is to take the last bit of broad to Geldeston south of Beccles and the aptly named Wherry, this is what well kept local Inns are all about with a excellent selection of local ales in a traditional Pub. There are far more Ales, Inns and Pubs on route and those are just the highlights, but don’t take my word for it hire a boat and explore! I have listed a few useful websites for you to gather information for a trip, go on take a Real Ale holiday in good old blighty you never know you might even get a suntan as well………I did! www.camra.org.uk www.barnesbrinkcraft.co.uk www.norwichcamra.freeserve.co.uk www.latelink.com/norfolk-map.htm www.woodfordes.co.uk

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