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cancerresearchuk.org

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3 Reviews
  • Good charity
  • Charities need money
  • Posted in someone elses account
  • Overpaid CEOs
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    • More +
      16.07.2015 18:57
      Very helpful
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      • "Good charity"

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      Charity begins in the board room.

      Now posted in My account where it should be!

      So, will the government actually go after ‘Big Charity’ like Cameron has promised to? The larger charities are clearly pressuring older people to give and when you get the disgusting situation were a confused octogenarian with Alzheimer’s is giving money to an Alzheimer’s charity because she actually has Alzheimer’s then something is very very wrong. Since when did the charity industry become so corporate? The answer can be seen on just how many high level charity directors and board members are on such good money. That money is increasingly not going to the actual people or animals that need it. They have an incentive to bring in more money with unscrupulous tactics as they get more money in their pay packet if they do.

      Some 30 charity chiefs are paid over £100,000 pounds per year. The highest paid Chief Exec is Professor Sugarman, who was awarded £673,000 in 2015/14, an increase of more than 14 per cent on his previous year's pay, according to the latest accounts filed by St Andrew's Healthcare, a charity based in my hometown of Northampton. Most of its money comes from taxpayers through government grants and it locks up some of the countries most dangerous people, and famous, perhaps why he has such a good deal to stop him telling just who is in there. Some very notable people have been in there, including a current royal and five MPs. Jimmy Savile has certainly been in there.

      Not surprisingly the highest paid high street charity bosses are the ones at the most well known and the ones that bug you with the ‘chuggers’. Branding is everything now. The Save the Children boss is pulling in a tasty £234,000 per year and the head of the British Red Cross on £163,000 last year, a charity that runs food banks. The top boss of Cancer Research is believed to be on around £220,000, a one Harpal Kamar. A direct debit or text amount of money into the charities coffers guarantees the charity so much money so the top people set their salaries by it. Cameron, of course, needs certain charities to succeed as the Tories continually cut public spending and welfare. The poorest WORKING families are to lose £2,000 per year due to changes in working tax credit and an undeliverable minimum wage yet the rich are getting a £2,000 tax break? Do the maths.

      Cancer Research is one of many cancer charities and the most notable of the 620 listed in the U.K alone. Some 5,000 charities are registered every year in the U.K. There are thousands and thousands of them, big and small, mergers between some of them sure to save money. But that means the boss who makes the merger call loses his salary. It isn’t going to happen. There are 200 homeless charities in London alone. 95% of our 165,000 registered charities are quite small though and some of them simple means to dodge corporate taxes. The head of the Royal Opera House ‘charity’ pulls in 721k a year!!! To quote the The Guardian – “In the last ten years, national and local government grants to charities and the voluntary sector fell by a third to £3bn. Over the same decade, the amount received in the form of service delivery contracts went up from £4.5bn to £11.2bn. A number of the largest heath charities are, unwittingly or not, actively complicit in the ideological dismantling of the NHS and statutory social care services, and for their own gain, while simultaneously sacrificing their independence and ability to advocate on behalf of the vulnerable”.

      Charity is big business and you are the customers.

      Gordon McVie, the chairman of Cancer Research, takes a different view on the idea of the top cancer charities merging here. It would be inappropriate, he says, for CRC and the Imperial Cancer Research Fund to merge with cancer care charities Marie Curie Cancer Care and Macmillan Cancer Relief. As for having one cancer research outfit, he insists that they already jointly fund research projects running to several million pounds. "Research suggests that we raise more money separately and that volunteers and donors are loyal to a brand," McVie says.

      Notice the words ‘loyal to the brand’.

      What I like about Cancer Research is they did merge in 2002 with the Imperial Cancer Research and most of their money is public donation. As 1-in-4 of you reading this will get cancer in your life time - and no doubt someone close to you with it - it’s a charity never short of donations. They generate £333 million a year between them. According to the website they spent 69% of that cash on actual cancer research. The Race for Life events where all the women dress up in pink has been very successful, encouraging good health to help fight cancer and solid heart felt donations. Sadly the rather pathetic Animal Aid charity targeted our top cancer charities for using animals in experiments - research to help save those lives of those very animal activists when they get cancer.

      Telephone fundraisers and chuggers are everywhere and hassling people at home is paying dividends as high pressure sales techniques applied. It’s no longer about giving but give it or something bad will happen. One call center that handles many charity campaigns are raking it in, charging £50,000 and upwards for contracts. Gen Gen has an income of millions every year running charity campaigns. The people on the phone lines are mostly student types moving from one campaign to another. Before lunch it could be saving the tiger and after lunch it could be feeding impoverished Indians, who are often eaten by the tigers. The owners of the company are living well off it, the Chairmen, three directors and investors all living in million pound homes on likewise six figure pay deals. Exactly why are people being allowed to make fortunes out of charities?

      The cancer research website is very busy and lots of things to do ad methods to contribute. You can just give that DD or perhaps just text in a fiver. You could volunteer for the high street charity shops or take a paid position. Managers earn around 17k. Most staff remain volunteers. I always shop in charity shops as its great value and they offer decent brands for next to nothing. The website offers an online shop that sells mostly pink things, target that female demographic that tend not to give as much as men. I found that statistic surprising as chuggers only ever target women on our high street. Maybe those tax dodging donations are mostly made by men.

      The site is full of personal testimony fighting this terrible disease and lots of social media links to get involved. There are lots of meaningless statistics and total totting up numbers changing on the screen, everything from how many hours the doctors and scientists have worked on curing cancer to how many miles run by our pink ladies. That is overcooking things when the message should stay simple. What they won’t tell you is chemo is only about 8% successful if cancer is detected late on and a huge waste of money. Radiotherapy is the better option, like we found out with that little lad and his family who ran off to Spain and then Hungary to be treated. Importantly there is number you can call on the site if you feel you may have symptoms and also chat rooms to talk with people who deal in cancer care or are suffers. But the most important thing is that if you are fit and healthy enjoy your life whilst you still can because there is in 89% you will have cancer or dementia before your 85th birthday.



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      • More +
        16.07.2015 13:02
        Very helpful
        (Rating)

        Advantages

        • "Charities need money"

        Disadvantages

        • "Overpaid CEOs"

        ' Chuggers'make me chug

        So, will the government actually go after ‘Big Charity’ like Cameron has promised to? The larger charities are clearly pressuring older people to give and when you get the disgusting situation were a confused octogenarian with Alzheimer’s is giving money to an Alzheimer’s charity because she actually has Alzheimer’s then something is very very wrong. Since when did the charity industry become so corporate? The answer can be seen on just how many high level charity directors and board members are on such good money. That money is increasingly not going to the actual people or animals that need it. They have an incentive to bring in more money with unscrupulous tactics as they get more money in their pay packet if they do.

        Some 30 charity chiefs are paid over £100,000 pounds per year. The highest paid Chief Exec is Professor Sugarman, who was awarded £673,000 in 2015/14, an increase of more than 14 per cent on his previous year's pay, according to the latest accounts filed by St Andrew's Healthcare, a charity based in my hometown of Northampton. Most of its money comes from taxpayers through government grants and it locks up some of the countries most dangerous people, and famous, perhaps why he has such a good deal to stop him telling just who is in there. Some very notable people have been in there, including a current royal and five MPs. Jimmy Savile has certainly been in there.

        Not surprisingly the highest paid high street charity bosses are the ones at the most well known and the ones that bug you with the ‘chuggers’. Branding is everything now. The Save the Children boss is pulling in a tasty £234,000 per year and the head of the British Red Cross on £163,000 last year, a charity that runs food banks. The top boss of Cancer Research is believed to be on around £220,000, a one Harpal Kamar. A direct debit or text amount of money into the charities coffers guarantees the charity so much money so the top people set their salaries by it. Cameron, of course, needs certain charities to succeed as the Tories continually cut public spending and welfare. The poorest WORKING families are to lose £2,000 per year due to changes in working tax credit and an undeliverable minimum wage yet the rich are getting a £2,000 tax break? Do the maths.

        Cancer Research is one of many cancer charities and the most notable of the 620 listed in the U.K alone. Some 5,000 charities are registered every year in the U.K. There are thousands and thousands of them, big and small, mergers between some of them sure to save money. But that means the boss who makes the merger call loses his salary. It isn’t going to happen. There are 200 homeless charities in London alone. 95% of our 165,000 registered charities are quite small though and some of them simple means to dodge corporate taxes. The head of the Royal Opera House ‘charity’ pulls in 721k a year!!! To quote the The Guardian – “In the last ten years, national and local government grants to charities and the voluntary sector fell by a third to £3bn. Over the same decade, the amount received in the form of service delivery contracts went up from £4.5bn to £11.2bn. A number of the largest heath charities are, unwittingly or not, actively complicit in the ideological dismantling of the NHS and statutory social care services, and for their own gain, while simultaneously sacrificing their independence and ability to advocate on behalf of the vulnerable”.

        Charity is big business and you are the customers.

        Gordon McVie, the chairman of Cancer Research, takes a different view on the idea of the top cancer charities merging here. It would be inappropriate, he says, for CRC and the Imperial Cancer Research Fund to merge with cancer care charities Marie Curie Cancer Care and Macmillan Cancer Relief. As for having one cancer research outfit, he insists that they already jointly fund research projects running to several million pounds. "Research suggests that we raise more money separately and that volunteers and donors are loyal to a brand," McVie says.

        Notice the words ‘loyal to the brand’.

        What I like about Cancer Research is they did merge in 2002 with the Imperial Cancer Research and most of their money is public donation. As 1-in-4 of you reading this will get cancer in your life time - and no doubt someone close to you with it - it’s a charity never short of donations. They generate £333 million a year between them. According to the website they spent 69% of that cash on actual cancer research. The Race for Life events where all the women dress up in pink has been very successful, encouraging good health to help fight cancer and solid heart felt donations. Sadly the rather pathetic Animal Aid charity targeted our top cancer charities for using animals in experiments - research to help save those lives of those very animal activists when they get cancer.

        Telephone fundraisers and chuggers are everywhere and hassling people at home is paying dividends as high pressure sales techniques applied. It’s no longer about giving but give it or something bad will happen. One call center that handles many charity campaigns are raking it in, charging £50,000 and upwards for contracts. Gen Gen has an income of millions every year running charity campaigns. The people on the phone lines are mostly student types moving from one campaign to another. Before lunch it could be saving the tiger and after lunch it could be feeding impoverished Indians, who are often eaten by the tigers. The owners of the company are living well off it, the Chairmen, three directors and investors all living in million pound homes on likewise six figure pay deals. Exactly why are people being allowed to make fortunes out of charities?

        The cancer research website is very busy and lots of things to do ad methods to contribute. You can just give that DD or perhaps just text in a fiver. You could volunteer for the high street charity shops or take a paid position. Managers earn around 17k. Most staff remain volunteers. I always shop in charity shops as its great value and they offer decent brands for next to nothing. The website offers an online shop that sells mostly pink things, target that female demographic that tend not to give as much as men. I found that statistic surprising as chuggers only ever target women on our high street. Maybe those tax dodging donations are mostly made by men.

        The site is full of personal testimony fighting this terrible disease and lots of social media links to get involved. There are lots of meaningless statistics and total totting up numbers changing on the screen, everything from how many hours the doctors and scientists have worked on curing cancer to how many miles run by our pink ladies. That is overcooking things when the message should stay simple. What they won’t tell you is chemo is only about 8% successful if cancer is detected late on and a huge waste of money. Radiotherapy is the better option, like we found out with that little lad and his family who ran off to Spain and then Hungary to be treated. Importantly there is number you can call on the site if you feel you may have symptoms and also chat rooms to talk with people who deal in cancer care or are suffers. But the most important thing is that if you are fit and healthy enjoy your life whilst you still can because there is in 89% you will have cancer or dementia before your 85th birthday.



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      • More +
        16.04.2015 15:16
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        • "Offers lots of advice and support."

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        Cancer Advice And Support

        Cancer is a terrible disease but it's something I didn't really know anything about until a close family member was diagnosed a couple of years ago. I decided I needed to find out more information about the disease and the prognosis and when I did an internet search I was guided to this page for the Cancer Research UK charity.

        The main page on the site is designed to appeal to those wishing to support or donate to the charity but the site is very comprehensive and the menu at the top of the page shows all of the page options. The 'About Cancer' tab is possibly the first place you'll want to visit if you are in the situation of just having received a diagnosis or you have a health worry. The site offers detailed information about all kinds of cancer. The information supplied includes causes, how you are screened or tested for the disease,symptoms, treatment and more. There is a special segment aimed at helping those diagnosed with the diseases through their treatments and advice on what to ask and how to cope. It's written with the patient in mind and it's a very helpful and caring guide to living with and dealing with cancer.

        The online website also offers information about what the charity does in terms of it's research. It provides links and information to other organisations you may be interested in or need the services of. They also provide details of how to support them for both individuals who wish to donate but also to professionals in the research field. It's a very comprehensive website.

        This is a great charity to support and it's obvious from the wonderful work they've done on their website that they are a caring, devoted, hard working and professional charity who deserve as much help as we can give them. I am so grateful to have found the site during a time when I felt quite upset and worried as it enabled me to learn about the disease and become prepared for the months ahead.

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