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Kingfisher Toothpaste

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£8.91 Best Offer by: amazon.co.uk See more offers
9 Reviews

Brand: Kingfisher / Type: Toothpaste / Texture: Gel / Skin type: for dry skin and for all types

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    9 Reviews
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      25.12.2011 19:59
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      Nice toothpaste

      I have long been a fan of Kingfisher toothpaste. We use it as my other half was worried about all the chemivals she was reading about in well known toiletry products and she decided that as a family we would try the Kingfisher barnd as a natural alternative to our usual Colgate or Mentadent P. I must have tried every single brand of toothpaste going over the years so was willing to give this one a try too.

      It cost £2.99 for the usual standard sized tube which comes in the good old cardboard box. The one we initially tried was fluoride free and fennel flavoured. This took a little while to get used to. The little lad didn't try it - he prefers his own children's toothpaste.

      The toothpaste is firm and sits on the brush as well as any others I've used but it doesn't tend to foam quite as much as our usual toothpaste I find. It does, however, leave a rather pleasant taste in the mouth afer brushing my teeth. It is not too strong and doesn't make me gag and seems to leave my breath feeling quite fresh and odour free.

      I dislike some toothpastes as they can be quite harsh on the mouth, especially if you suffer from the occasional mouth ulcer as I do. This toothpaste is actually quite kind to my gunms and when I have used it when I have had a little ulcer on the side of my tongue, it has been fine and has not caused me any bother or additional pain.

      It's a nice toothpaste and good if you are looking for something more natural and without additives or chemicals.

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      09.04.2010 23:51
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      A great natural alternative to regular toothpastes.

      After all the horror stories about the dangers of chemicals found in products these days, some of the worst culprits seem to be deodorants and toothpastes. In terms of the latter, I have also found that many of these products irritate the gums and cause a burning sensation for some time afterwards. This makes me wonder what they are actually doing over a period of a lifetime. In line with my "Natural Switchover" to all things chemical-free, I bought the mint version of Kingfisher's natural toothpaste.

      There is much debate about the safety of fluoride in toothpastes, and everyone has to make their own decision, but having done my research, I decided that, on balance, I wanted a toothpaste with fluoride. Since there is no fluoride in the water where I live and it is used in such small amounts in toothpaste, (and you don't - or shouldn't - swallow it), I've decided that, for me, the benefits of cavity prevention outweigh any negatives, (though personally, I would not give fluoride toothpaste to children).

      Having decided on this, I went looking for a toothpaste that contained fluoride but no SLS. The only one I could find was Tom's of Maine, but that particular one is currently only available in the US. (I had previously tried Green People's peppermint toothpaste - I'm not sure if this contains SLS or not - but after a while, it made my teeth go green!) I resigned myself to the fact that I was going to have to use a product containing SLS. Again, since it is a small amount and you are not swallowing the product, I don't think this is as bad as when found in some products, though it is not ideal. But you can't have it all (unless someone knows of an SLS-free fluoride toothpaste that doesn't stain your teeth and would like to tell me about it).

      One of the things I hate most about a lot of toothpastes is the taste; it's either non-descript and a bit revolting or so overpowering it stings your whole mouth. I particularly like Kingfisher in this respect as the mint flavour is enough to give you the feeling that your teeth and mouth are clean and fresh, but without setting your whole mouth on fire. Aside from the ingredients mentioned, the others are fairly safe and natural as far as I can tell. In addition, the packaging states that this product is an "Ethical Consumer Magazine Best Buy". Always good to know.

      This toothpaste contains no animal products and nor is it tested on animals. It is also approved by the British Dental Health Foundation and a "valuable aid to oral health". All these things go in its favour and make it a good choice for anyone wanting to eliminate the dangers of such ingredients as aluminium, for instance. I paid £2.99 for this toothpaste, which seems really quite reasonable, considering some of the fancy new (dangerous) ones are well over £3.

      As for the packaging, like most toothpastes, this one comes in a cardboard tube, which can obviously be recycled. The toothpaste tube itself is not one of those irritating metal ones that you have to fold over as you use it, so you can pretty much get every last bit of the product out. The only thing I would say about this product is that I tend to use a little more than I did when using something like Colgate, for instance, as it doesn't foam quite as much. Hopefully this is a good thing and suggests that the SLS content is fairly low!

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        26.03.2010 16:43
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        The mainstream chainstores should take a leaf out of this book

        ---An Introduction---

        Kingfisher are a range of natural toothpastes made with and without flouride in the UK. They contain no artificial colourings, flavourings, sweeteners or preservatives.

        ---A little bit of history...---

        They started making Kingfisher Natural Toothpaste in 1988 by Kingfisher's founder and proprietor Richard Austin (who opened one of the first health food shops 'Rainbow Wholefoods' in 1976). He decided that people would want the option of a completely natural toothpaste - as a small amount each time you brush gets absorbed into the teeth and gums. I like the fact it is made in the UK, reducing my carbon footprint. I bought mine direct from the original shop too.

        ---Still approved of...---

        Very often you will find that a lot of the more ethical and natural toothpastes have no accreditation - not so with this brand, the BDHF (British Dental Health Foundation) recognise the effectiveness of this product in maintaining good dental health.

        ---Also approved of by all animals!---

        PETA have named it the Best Cruelty-free Toiletries and Beauty Product. It has never been tested on animals. This is reassuring - what with so many labels saying "against cruelty" but still testing on animals, it is good to see a regulator approving of them.

        ---My experience.---

        I chose the flouride-free mint flavour. I decided that all round it was the best option - safe for the whole family to use (no need for separate childrens version), tea-tree free which my partner is sensitive to, flouride-free meaning no cutting huge chunks out of the countryside!

        It lathers up well in your mouth and tastes fresh without the sickly artificial sweet taste you get with more mainstream brands. My breath has been fresher for longer than other toothpastes - I have also noticed how fresh-smelling my partner's breath has been too. Your teeth are left feeling shiny clean without any residue.

        ---Just a small query.---

        Looking at the ingredients, I noticed the sodium lauryl sulfate was derived from palm oil. The website (kingfishertoothpaste.com) has contact details for Richard Austin who will be happy to answer you directly - I have asked how the palm oil has been sourced due to the recent news about orangtans being endangered from the harvesting of it. When I get a reply, I will update this review. FOOTNOTE: By the time I had submitted this review, my email had been replied to promptly by Mr Austin and he assures me that the palm oil is from a sustainable resource and works closely with the WWF to protect the species... perfect!

        Please take a look at the website for further information. Or if you live near Norwich, why not pop in and have a browse around Rainbow Wholefoods and buy direct!

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        24.07.2009 20:03
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        I highly recommend it

        I wanted to switch to natural toothpaste but I was always afraid that it won't work as well as my usual thing. When it comes to teeth is not something where you can ignore efficient products. God forbid (and I am not even religious) you have to use and NHS dentist in UK, the system and the people that work there... well... I just can't think a word bad enough to express my disgust. So please brush your teeth!!!!!!!!!!!!
        Or else you might just as well run for the hills!


        I have been using Kingfisher for a year now and I am really pleased. I truthfully can say that it has kept my teeth very well, just like all the other big brand names it just as efficient and safe.

        I prefer to use the fluoride free variety. I come from another place before UK and there I spend 21 years without using fluoride toothpaste or having fluoride in water and I am perfectly fine. I have seen many others that have not been exposed to fluoride a lifetime so teeth without fluoride keen in the same over time, don't buy into the media and allow then to feed you poison.

        From kingfisher I absolutely love the fennel one. It tastes a bit sweet could be a bit odd for some but I love it, this is how old fashioned toothpaste use to taste in the past for me. Also I highly the baking soda one, as you know baking soda is salty in taste but after brushing my teeth with this one at the end my teeth feel so unbelievably clean is like I used mouthwash or something better.

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        21.06.2008 16:50
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        A brilliant ethical product recommended by PETA for cruelty free ethics.

        Kingfisher natural toothpaste is such a great brand of toothpaste. It comes in three flavours; Aloe Vera, Fennel and Mint (for the most conventional hippies) and seven varieties that offer both fluoride and non fluoride types. They have no artificial preservatives, flavourings, colourings or whiteners. It is GM free, Gluton free, not tested on animals and made in the UK!

        Kingfisher is generally cruelty free, never tested on animals and PETA named this brand as the best cruelty free toiletry. They have been reported as saying they would rather go out of business than comply with animal cruelty forms of standard testing and research!

        Richard, who founded Kingfisher Natural Toothpaste, felt it had to have the same values as Rainbow Wholefoods, which he started in 1976 (he still works on both projects). So Kingfisher is strictly vegetarian (in fact it is vegan), Halal and Kosher! It uses no animal ingredients whatsoever and has never used animal testing.

        Kingfisher attempts to minimise its impact on the environment and to contribute where it can to positive projects locally and abroad especially in Tibet.

        You can generally find out a massive amount about the ingredients of all flavours on the Kingfisher website which is very user friendly and can be found on www.kingfishertoothpaste.com.

        I know that the Fennel flavour is not very popular but it is my favourite of all the flavours. It really does leave your mouth feeling fresh and clean without having that 'minty' 'burning' freshness from other brands that can sometimes leave your eyes watering! Its very gentle and gives a very good clean. If you're not a fan of mint, I would recommend try this flavour as it really rocks!

        The BDHF approval means that this brand can be natural and an effective clean!

        This can be bought from most Holland Barrat stores and some supermarkets. There is a stockers list on the Kingfisher website if you are having trouble finding it and retail price varies between £1.90-£2.00.

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        16.10.2002 01:10
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        Clean Teeth, Clean Conscience. Some time ago I tried Kingfisher toothpaste but unfortunately it was the fennel flavoured one. Seeing as fennel makes me want to gag at the smell of it, the idea of cleaning my teeth with the stuff was never going to take of with me! However I was unhappy with using brands from larger companies. Even buying the not-tested-on animals shop brand didn't make me feel a lot better - mostly because of the ridiculous amount of chemicals used in the toothpaste itself and also my bleak distrust of the dubious promises of large companies that my toothpaste really was animal free. A trip to the local organic shop last week gave me a chance to put my beliefs into action and I decided to have another try at Kingfisher. To my instant delight I noticed that they now make a variety of flavours namely:- Aloe Vera/tea tree mint Aloe Vera /tea tree fennel Baking soda mint Fennel fluoride free Fennel Mint fluoride free Mint with lemon fluoride free Instantly I chose the lemon and mint - mainly because I like lemon and I guess years of conditioning have left me with the thought that toothpaste should be a little minty! The price of a small 50ml pack was £1.29. I bought the larger 125ml and can?t now remember exactly what I paid for it - around £2.50 I think. Kingfisher was the idea of Richard Austin who set up Rainbow Wholefoods in 1976. In those days no company needed to specify the ingredients used in their toothpaste - we brushed in the dark. Mr. Austin set an idea in motion and began to commission research into a healthier alternative toothpaste - one based on natural products. In 1988 Kingfisher was launched. Despite pressure from the EEC to test on animals, Kingfisher refused point blank -their ethics stating that they would rather go out of business than test on animals. Happily they are still with us; proof that you can put your foot down! Apart from being wh
        oll y against animal testing and the use of animal products in their toothpaste Kingfisher also have a great deal more to offer on the ethical front. The outer cardboard box is recycled cardboard, the inner tube is made from biodegradable cellulose - all with a mind to how their product impacts the planet. Kingfisher also vigorously campaign against GMO foods/technology which gives them another star in my book. Kingfisher toothpaste is also marked fluoride free, something that has concerned me for sometime. Luckily Manchester is a low fluoride area and I believe the council does not add fluoride to the water although I need to check on that point. Fluoride is one of the most common elements and occurs naturally - why on earth then it is added to our water I'll never know. I would rather have the choice to add or not to add (although I guess that's where a water purifier comes in handy). Fluoride does reduce the occurrence of tooth decay but due to the fact it is found so much in the natural environment it is likely we aren't wanting for fluoride! A rising incidence of the condition fluorosis has been cause for concern. This manifests as gradual discolouration of the teeth, particularly in children. The teeth become stained and pocked and eventually look a dirty brown. Some have suggested it is wiser to brush your child's teeth with a fluoride free toothpaste at least up to the age of three. More information (plus some gross pictures) can be found at http://www.purewatergazette.net/caseagainstfluoride.htm I have to say that if something can eat away at the enamel on your teeth I am wondering what else it can work it's way through? Toxicologists would also say that fluoride tooth stain is the first sign of chronic fluoride poisoning. Another point about ordinary toothpaste is that it often contains very abrasive chemicals. Our teeth are not meant to be whiter than white whatever the shiny adverts say. Striving to get
        this effect by brushing with hard abrasives is just likely to give you one hell of a sore mouth or worse. Many people suffer from mouth ulcers caused by sodium lauryl sulphate. This is the stuff that makes your toothpaste foamy. It has also been linked to possible intestinal and liver problems. Basically it's an industrial strength detergent ugghh! Now this would be my one complaint about Kingfisher in that it uses this and I have to say I'm completely surprised to see it in the ingredients. I guess because it is derived from palm oil it is a natural ingredient but still I wonder if they have always used this or whether it is only in particular flavours? I shall email them and ask and if I receive a reply I will post it here. To offset the SLS problem above, traditional companies also dump in another chemical going by the name of Triclosan. As per usual though this is a hamfisted attempt as this chemical is known to increase the growth of superbugs that are resistant to antibiotics. Thankfully we don't see that here. In contrast Kingfisher is gentle on you (well 99% so) and your planet. Ingredients in my lemon and mint flavour are Calcium carbonate (chalk) Vegetable glycerine (from palm oils) Aqua Silica (from natural ore) Sodium lauryl sulphate (from palm oil) Cellulose gum (from plant fibre) Menthe piperita (mint) Citrus limonum (lemon) Foeniculum vulgare (fennel) (no surprise the word vulgar is associated with this plant!) It does taste nice. Not as strong as your normal toothpaste but still a nice fresh taste all the same. My teeth feel clean after using it and my mouth doesn't sting from over mintyness. Aside from the SLS issue I have to say that Kingfisher meets all the criteria for a product which is ethically and environmentally sound. At the end of the day I would rather give my money to them than some large faceless corporation probably owned by Proctor an
        d Gamble and the like. Look after your teeth! http://www.kingfishertoothpaste.com

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          26.09.2000 14:09
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          Did you know that flouride is one of the most toxic chemicals out there? And that various campaigners allege one of the main reasons that some folks are so keen to see it in our water supply is that it provides a way fo getting rid of this chemical insdustry waste product? I'm not entirely sold on the consipracy theories (although I don't discount them either); but I do know I'm not too keen on swilling this chemical round my system a couple of times every day; not to mention the fact that the evidence that it has any effect at all on adult teeth is sketchy to say the least. So I've always tried to buy flouride-free toothpaste; which has proved quite problematic over the years, there just isn't a lot out there. Which is why I've been very pleased to see Kingfisher arrive in an increasing number of 'mainstream' shops and supermarkets over the past year or so. It's toothpaste, but probably not as you know it. The taste is pretty different, much, I suspect, to do with the emphasis on natural ingredients. It's available in lots of flavors, but the fennel, a liquorice/aniseed kind of taste, is the only one I use, just because I really like the taste and it does the job for me. I've used it for years; I've got very few fillings and it basically works as well as anything else that's manufactured by the major multinationals.

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            02.08.2000 21:18
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            I confess, I don't like the taste of "normal" toothpaste. For a while I avoided it altogether, even resorted to just baking soda a couple of times (my brain is going "groooogh" right now at the memory - don't do it, kids!), until I decided I'd better learn to live with it for the sake of my teeth. Basically I just find the taste disgusting, far too sweet and sickly. And look at the ingredients on the back - no wonder they tell you not to swallow it ;) When I went to the States I discovered Tom's of Maine (but that's another review entireley - heh :), an all-natural-ingredients toothpaste, through a veggie friend of mine. I tried it, liked the taste, and so looked for it over here when I returned. I found it, but while looking I found Kingfisher, which seemed to be the same sort of thing but a bit cheaper (natural toothpastes are more expensive), and decided to try their Lemon & Mint flavour. It was a good choice. Like any natural toothpaste, Kingfisher takes a bit of getting used to at first, as it's nothing like as sweet as the regular stuff, or as overpoweringly minty (friends who borrow my toothpaste usually grimace when they taste it!). But this is a Good Thing if you can't stand the taste of normal toothpaste, and you quickly get used to it if you're using it twice a day. Besides, it's all due to their use of only natural ingredients and flavours, which is a good thing in my book. As far as its other qualities go, its mouthfeel is pretty much like any other toothpaste, maybe a bit less smooth than some, but not overly abrasive. Your teeth feel just as clean after using Kingfisher as any other, and you don't get tons of foam or that nasty sticky-mouth aftertaste! Personally I prefer the Lemon & Mint flavour to their other variety, a fluoride-free fennel flavour (ha, there's a tongue-twister). The fennel taste is quite strong, much more so than the Tom's of M
            aine fennel variety, and I could understand this putting people off. However, I can't find anything but fennel flavour in my local shops at the minute :( It's available in Boots and Sainsbury's that I know of, and probably elsewhere too. Maybe you won't get all the amazing (unbelievable?) benefits attributed to so many "normal" toothpastes, but I would say that Kingfisher makes brushing your teeth a more pleasant experience, which is the biggest benefit I could ask for.

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              21.07.2000 22:09
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              I used to use Tom of Maine's toothpaste but after rumours of their funding the homophobic "religious right" I decided I should look elsewhere to see what alternatives are available. I do want to point out though that nothing was ever presented to back up that rumour and by all accounts it appears to be untrue and unfair. The reason why I never went back was because I found something better. Looking for rival products I could only find one, Kingfisher toothpaste. What makes Tom's and Kingfisher unique is that they are both completely free of animal products, the ingrediants listing on the products for both companies produts not only lists what the contents are, but where they came from and why they are used. Both are also sugar free which is claerly better for you but is supposed to affect the taste. It does warn you on the packet that it will take time to get used to the flavour but once you do you wouldn't want to go back. Personally though I haven't really noticed the difference. There isn't really that much difference between Kingfisher toothpaste and any other 'mass market' brands. It's thick, white, brushes into your teeth and removes plaque. What does favour Kingfisher though, apart from it being a totally ethical product, is that you can choose whether to buy with or without flouride added, a choice you don't normally get with other toothpastes, and a more interesting choice of flavours. Rather than just several different mints there is a fennel one and a lemon and mint one I have yet to try. This quite literally makes a refreshing change. In terms of how well it performs I have not noticed any problems and it leaves my teeth feeling clean. Kingfisher is hard to buy as supermarkets only seem to sell the Flouride Free Fennel one. A trip to Holland & Barret or other health food stores is in order for the fuller range. The cost of Kingfisher is significantly less than Tom of
              Maine's but considering the tube size (2.6 oz) a little bit more than most other brands, I would not call it expensive. For a few extra pennies, because that's all the difference is, you get an ethical product and the knowledge of excatly what it is you are putting in your mouth, and why. Kingfisher is also approved by the British Dental Health Foundation.

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