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Primary School Stages in general

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  • start to become fearful
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      31.01.2009 12:20

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      the way schools are on the isle of wight

      I come from London , and grew up going to school there , but I now live on the Isle of Wight. The school stages are very differnent on the Isle of Wight to that in London. The way I am used to is ............. going to Primary school from the age of 4 , until the age of 11 , then moving up to secondary school until the age of 16. But the school stages on the island seem confusing to me. Here the children start Primary school aged from 4 until 8-9. Then they go to a middle school until the age of 12 , then up to High school until the age of 16. It seems like alot of change for changes sake to me. Alot of moving up through different schools losing friends along the way to other schools, and having to make new ones , plus lots of new uniform to buy. There is talk of changing the primary school stages to that of the main land, but that hasn't gone down to well. My son is only 14 months old, so I don't need to worry about it until a few more years yet, but I know that time does fly quickly. I just wonder which system will be in place when his time comes.

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      07.05.2005 03:15
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      My little girl is 5 this October and she starts reception year in September. I am glad that she will attend school with her brother who will be two years up from her..
      It is just that when you give birth to these bundles of joy, it never prepares you for that little feeling of loss as they walk through the school gate for the first time. Even though the teacher may have had 20 years of experience, there is still that nagging doubt as to if your little cherub will be looked after ok. Isn't it bizarre? In a way we parents should be celebrating regaining a little bit of spare time.... although we don't, do we.
      Remember my sons first day.... I was ok until I started walking out of his new class. Got home and cried my eyes out because my little boy had grown up!!! How silly Heh!

      I am lucky that my children attend such a small school... 66 pupils in total ranging from ages 4-11. The teachers are great and the kids love it...

      Best thing that has happened to my Son and I am sure my daughter will love it too. (ALthough teachers may find my daughter is a bit more of handful than my son)

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        26.04.2005 14:14
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        When you first take your child to school it is one of the most frightening moments of your life, you have to learn to let go and give them some independence, it is as scary for them as it is for you on their first day but you get used to it and end up enjoying the bit of peace and quiet you get once their out of your hair for the day. It is always an advantage to get to know their teacher so that you would feel more comfotable leaving your child at school with them.

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          27.02.2004 09:03
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          • "start to become fearful"

          My son is about to turn 5. It seems like yesterday to me that he was in his toddler stage. Hainvg had baby number 2 (iyr old now) my son is now the `big boy'. He wants to be independent. And god knows he's been going to nursery since 6months, schools since 3yrs (half days) and reception class since 4yrs (full days). So he has earned a certain amount of independant activity. It used to scare me rotten when he disappeared out of my sight when playing in the park, now he runs home from school across the park and we are often at opposite sides (but still within eye sight). He decides he is going to go somewhere with mates, and believe me 4yr olds are difficult to catch once they get warmed up. He has star charts and stickers at school, and I have continued this at home. He dresses himself (fairly sucessfully) each morning, cleans his own teeth, pours milk on his cereal, can put on his shoes and coat and zip it up. He puts out knives and forks at meal times and generally likes to help out at home. He also likes to watch TV and eat sweets and pick his nose, and wipe his hands down his clothes, tells fibs, can never remember what he did at school, take his brothers toys off him and whine when he gets tired. He can still be my little boy. Here are some handy hints that I have discovered for dealing with the first years of primary school - well reception. 1. Get velcro fastening shoes - I know they need to learn to do their laces - but there is independence in being able to put on your own shoes. 2. Do star charts (or colour charts or stickers) we have 4 things he must practice to do to get a square coloured in. There are 20 squares a line and 2 lines for each activity. Once a line is filled he can have £2 worth of goodies. Once a whole chart is coloured in he can have £10 worth of goodies. I should have perhaps started at a lower cost as it can get expensive all at once when lines arefinishe
          d and charts filled! But it works, then we put new challenges on to replace the things he does well and leave other ones on for those he needs to practice more. Getting dressed, chaning clothes from school have come off. Tidying toys has been on for about 4 months! 3. Get underwear that is obvious as to what way round it goes. Something with a tag at the back, or a picture on the front. It is amazing how many wrong ways round a child can put on a pair of underpants. 4. Put milk in a jug in the fridge, cereal in a bowl and a cup on the table (ours gets covered witha plate as we have cats!). Breakfast can be started without the need to get mammy or daddy out of bed at 6.30am! 5. Do deals - we do deals on behaviour. If I agree not to shout, he has to agree not to whine on. If one of us is breaking the deal then we just say "Errr I have to remind you that you are dong **** and we had a deal". This means improving behaviour becomes a 2 way thing, and we don't end up shouting at each other over silly things. 6. Discuss the day in terms that your child can relate to. Discussion on "what have you done at school today" just dosen't work. I have to find out what games were played with who and what was for dinner before I find out what subject he was doing at school. 7. Keep it in perspective. My son falls in and out of friendships as quickly as he breathes. A child I think is picking on him soon turns into best mate. 8. Keep your childs options open. A friend gave us a huge Barbie car, my son loved it but made me promise not to tell anyone at school it was Barbies. A few action man stickers solved the problem.I have let my son buy a baby born set, if he hadn't chosen it I would have bought it for myself and let him play with it. As it was clear he wanted to. This is easier with 2 children of opposite genders, you do find by now that everyone is buying boys `boys' toys
          and girls `girls' toys. 9. Monitor TV use as role modles and heroes are formed from here on in. My son play acts all his favourite cartoons and programmes religiously adhereing to detail. Beware how far unsupervised children take it! the yahve wuite an imagination at this age, but not too hot on cuase and effect.

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