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Call to Power 2 (PC)

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A strategy game developed and published by Activision. The empire-building game puts you in control of a civilization over the course of 6000 years. You control city growth diplomacy economic development and trade military conquest and a variety of other factors related to empire management

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    9 Reviews
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      01.07.2001 05:45

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      Oh! This is cool. I'm going to win a lot of money. Thank you dooyoo. Come on bastards, stop me if you can Oh! This is cool. I'm going to win a lot of money. Thank you dooyoo. Come on bastards, stop me if you can Oh! This is cool. I'm going to win a lot of money. Thank you dooyoo. Come on bastards, stop me if you can Oh! This is cool. I'm going to win a lot of money. Thank you dooyoo. Come on bastards, stop me if you can Oh! This is cool. I'm going to win a lot of money. Thank you dooyoo. Come on bastards, stop me if you can Oh! This is cool. I'm going to win a lot of money. Thank you dooyoo. Come on bastards, stop me if you can ! This is cool. I'm going to win a lot of money. Thank you dooyoo. Come on bastards, stop me if you can Oh! This is cool. I'm going to win a lot of money. Thank you dooyoo. Come on bastards, stop me if you can Oh! This is cool. I'm going to win a lot of money. Thank you dooyoo. Come on bastards, stop me if you can Oh! This is cool. I'm going to win a lot of money. Thank you dooyoo. Come on bastards, stop me if you can Oh! This is cool. I'm going to win a lot of money. Thank you dooyoo. Come on bastards, stop me if you can Oh! This is cool. I'm going to win a lot of money. Thank you dooyoo. Come on bastards, stop me if you can ! This is cool. I'm going to win a lot of money. Thank you dooyoo. Come on bastards, stop me if you can Oh! This is cool. I'm going to win a lot of money. Thank you dooyoo. Come on bastards, stop me if you can Oh! This is cool. I'm going to win a lot of money. Thank you dooyoo. Come on bastards, stop me if you can Oh! This is cool. I'm going to win a lot of money. Thank you dooyoo. Come on bastards, stop me if you can Oh! This is cool. I'm going to win a lot of money. Thank you dooyoo. Come on bastards, stop me if you can Oh! This is cool. I'm going to win a lot of money. Thank you dooyoo. Come on bastards, stop me if you can

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      29.06.2001 02:04
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      Call to Power 2 is the latest of the Civilisation series, and although it does not bear the famous name due to some legal problems, it does have the same great gameplay that made all the previous games so good. I actually got Call to Power 1 and Call to Power 2 from Amazon for only £25, which was good considering that everywhere else was charging that much just for the second one on its own. Even better though, is that opinion is divided on which is best so I could try them both out for myself. What was clear was that a lot of people thought the original game was flawed, and the second was an attempt to put right the mistakes they made in the first game. Changes are subtle, and indeed I will probably write a review on Call to Power 1 soon, but first of all I still have to do this one!! Here I was assuming that everyone is a Civilisation freak like me, but I guess not, so I had better say a bit about what Civilisation is. Civilisation is the creation of Sid Mier, and the original games were immensely popular on many formats. The pinnacle of the series must be the original Civilisation 2 on the PC, but the new Call to Power series does a very good job too. You are given control of a civilisation, chosen from a list that includes the English, Aztecs and Mongols. You start in 4000BC with one settler - enough to create one city. From this one city you build units, research new technologies and move on to create new cities and build an empire. The game is turn based, and starts in 4000BC. Call to Power 2 moves through to 2300AD. Throughout the game you invent new technology, which mean you can build more and more advanced units and buildings. You can win in one of three ways, either by conquering the world, creating the ultimate technology or simply scoring more points. Or you could of course lose. In comparison with the original Civilisation Call to Power 2 adds a lot of new features. It extends the game time from 2020AD in the original to 2300AD. There are a lot of new units and technologies, as well as enhanced graphics. On the other hand, in comparison with the original Call to Power this game actually removes some content. Call to Power 1 carried on until 3000AD. Both games feature underwater cities and units, but the original Call to Power also featured space as an arena for building and war. So why did they remove all this? A lot of people liked the original Call to Power, but even more people hated it. No one thought that it was truly bad, but a lot of people felt it was rushed. A patch released went a fair way to fixing the problem, but there was a lot of new, and often confusing features which were added to the game. I haven't had time to play the first Call to Power to have a fair view on it, but fear not, when I do I'll write a review! So what else does Call to Power give you? The graphics look a little nicer, sharper and less cartoony, but with keeping in with the rest of the series this game is no graphical masterpiece. The graphics are still functional, not amazing. In the old game when you had a large empire fighting battles on many fronts it could become very confusing. This game introduces a mayor system. You appoint a mayor and he or she look after your cities for you, building the best units and improvements for the situation. This can be a god send at busy times, but every Civ player will know there are times when you need to stay quiet and keep yourself to yourself, and at these times mayors can reduce your involvement in the game to nil. Another good feature is the diplomacy and proposal section. It has been updated and it is now possible to make pretty complex demands and offers. The problem is that they nearly always say no, which makes it all a bit pointless. Half of this problem is down to a new feature which implements borders of a nation. These are in addition to the city limits which the old games had. The problem here is that other countries get mad if you enter their nation, but trying not to is rather hard. The standard way to play Civilisation is using a randomly generated map, but in this game you can create your own, or play in one of 3 ready made scenarios. There are a few options you can choose to vary the gameplay, as well as setting all the variables such as map size, no. of rivals and difficulty. All Civilisation games use what is known as a technology tree, a family tree style of new technologies in the order they must be researched. For example, you can't research flight before you've completed physics. All the Civ games have a tech tree which is pretty much common up until the modern era, ie. the time we are living in now! The Call to Power 2 tech tree is a lot larger than the original game to accommodate the futuristic events that occur, although again, in comparison with the original Call to Power it is shorter. But the biggest plus point of Call to Power 2 is the refined game mechanics. It works better than the original, or put simply, it was less rushed than the original. But this produces a dilemma in itself, Call to Power 2 is probably the better game, but with the additional aspects of the Call to Power 1 which does the Civ player play? Honestly I don't know!! The game does support online play, but by it's very nature it takes ten's of hours to play a game of Civilisation so this isn't exactly your quick pick up and play game. If you have a friend who wants to play a game then it can be done over the course of months, playing a few hours at a time. I just need someone to play with (anyone fancy a game?). The game runs very fast, and even when playing on big maps with lots of opponents the game is fast to get through the AI nations turns. The specs are fairly modest, but the speed of the game on large maps with lots going on will increase with a better PC, the minimum specs are Windows 95/98/ME/2000 Pentium 166Mhz (233Mhz recommended) 64Mb RAM 470Mb HDD Space 4MB Video Card 16 bit Sound Card 4x Cd-ROM 28.8Kbs (or faster) modem for net play On the whole if you have never heard of Civilisation before then I would say get this game, it is the best of the series so far. For those die hard fans go over to Amazon and get the pair - see which you prefer!

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        25.06.2001 16:33
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        For me the Civilisation series is what a strategy game should contain. In both Civilisation and Civilisation 2 have it all and for me are classics. In Civilisation 2: Call to Power follows the same aims as the original Civilisation, you build your original city, extract the local resources to build a home base, then go off explore and take new land, by force in necessary. You also research technologic advances, to continue to beat the other civs around you. To win the game you can either go for military conquest, or a science victory if you research the right techs you can win the games. The standard game is turn based. On each turn you can move your units across the map and edit what your cites produce. No resources are used like Age Of Empires; instead all units take a certain amount of turns to complete. In the city you can produce three things, units, general buildings or wonders. Buildings all have functions that improve your civilisation, like defence bonuses or faster production. Wonders also add bonuses, but are usually bigger bonuses, and take longer to build. Units are of a greater range than the original Civilisation, with different units being different attributes, such as more attack or defence, or faster movement. All buildings and units take different times to produce so calls for discipline and management to keep all your cities producing useful things at the right times. If a city is near water then navy boats can be built. A typical game is on a generated map which you can change levels of water and vegetation. Different terrain types yield different resource that if near one of your cities can be used to produce units quicker or get money through trade. Terrain tiles also affect movement, for example you move faster in grassland than jungle. The graphics are reasonable for a strategy game like this, as is the quality of the sound. The battle scenes are calculated by the strength of the attacking and defending unit s and bonuses like terrain and city walls, but not great in graphical terms. Linking units increased battle strength. The basic units are settlers that build the cities, roads and other stuff, and the military units advance as you research technologies. Different governments really affect what your civ does and new units are constantly being researched to add depth to the games. The game really advances towards the end, with you being able to build cities underwater and in space, and other nice wonders and technologies, but somethings I got too bored to play on that long. Civilisation does have a few things that irritated me, such as poor menus and a few functions hard to perform and the manual was of little help, but still do not complain and the positive factors far outweigh the minus. Civilisation is a great game that gives you all the feeling of playing a strategy game with you needing to calculate what you are doing, but also provides a lot of fun and hours of entertainment. It is not perfect, but very few games could claim to be, but overall a really great game

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          27.05.2001 07:20
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          Call to power 2 is part of the series which grew from the original civilization by Sid Meier and like all other games based on Civilization it is truly excellent. The object of the game is to take complete control of one of about 25 civilizations, you then have to guide this civilization through 6000 years against up to 7 other rival civilizations ultimately striving for military and scientific superiority. there are several ways to win the game: Get the highest score - At 2300 AD the scores for your civilization and the other 7 civilizations are added up and if your civilization has the highest score then you win. You gain a score by winning wars and building wonders of the world and generally keeping all your citizens happy. Gaia Victory - This is the technological victory, the Gaia controller is a device capable of eradicating all pollution on a global scale and it is the ultimate technology. If your nation successfully activates the Gaia network then you win. World Domination - This is the most obvious way to win, if all the other nations have been conquered (by you) then you become the leader of the planet and you win. World Peace - If your nation forms an alliance with every other nation on the planet then you win. Civilization:Call to power 2 is a VERY addictive game and each time you play it, it is different because the worlds are all randomly generated. The game also has the added utility of a map editor which you can use to create your own worlds or, by using the cheat mode, you can modify a game whilst you are half way through it. The technology tree is also very good, it extends from ancient knowledge such as writing and masonry through the modern age and into the future where the technology becomes mainly ocean orientated and underwater cities can be constructed. The units are also very good there are at least 50 different units all with there own statistics meaning that when war is declared there is a certain level of strategic thinking required to attempt to outmaneuvour your opponent across the globe and bring victory to your nation. can you co-ordinate air, naval and land forces well enough to overrun your oponent from all sides or will outdated units lead to a long drawn out war with casualties sky rocketing ? I really recomend Call to power 2 to anybody it is an excellent game which is very addictive and with hindsight i would definetely buy the game again if i had to. The only downside to this game is the amount of time required to play a game all the way through.

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            06.04.2001 19:24
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            I'm a sucker for strategy simulation games and this one hasn't let me down. I had not played its predecessor, Civilisation:Call to Power, but I'm told that this is a vast improvement in every way. Taking it as I find it, however, it's got all the elements that a good game of this type needs and I can see myself playing it (on and off) for months ahead. You start off in the year 4000BC with only a sim settler for company. Before you is a huge, unexplored map. You choose what looks like a good place to start and get building. Every time you take a turn, you can build, explore, grow, trade, fight and expand. Every so often, as the time ticks away, you will enter a new 'age' and this generates a new goal for the civilisation you are building up. You are, at the beginning, in ancient worlds and then go through Middle Ages, present day and on to the space age beyond. What I particularly like about it is that it is not all war orientated. Sometimes it's better to be diplomatic in your dealings with other civilisations you come across. If you can create world peace, then that is one way of winning the game. Makes a nice change, that. As a new player to this particular game, I liked the way you get help when you first start. There's sometimes a lot of choices to be made and this helps to explain what the options are. Graphics are good, although not excellent. But then again, you get drawn into the gameplay so much it doesn't seem to matter. There's also a facility to play with up to four other people either over the internet or a network of computers. Maybe when I get a bit better at this game, I'll try it. You need only a 166MHz processor to play this, 64Mb of memory and 470Mb of hard disk space. This last is a bit hefty, but the amount of information the game must manipulate has got to be pretty huge. Overall, a very good game - especially for people like me who like to get absorbed in world domination (in the most positive sense). I only wish I'd got this game when the winter was starting. Then I wouldn't have felt so bad about hiding myself away for hours on end playing the wretched thing. After all, what else is there to do when the weather's bad? A bit of civilisation building is just the job, isn't it?

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            09.03.2001 00:06
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            Call to Power 2 like all the other games in the Sid Meier series of Civilisation is a superbly thought and crafted game. I have all the Civilisation games and I rate all of them very highly. I will now give you a quick run through of the themes and points of the game. First of all, you must know that Call to Power is a turn-based game. This basically means that you have a go and move all your units and then the computer has its go. It's not simultaneous. I think this is the best way to do a game like this as people with slow reactions (like me) can take the game nice and slowly at their own pace. As this game is turn based it means that everything you make in your cities and the actual time of the game revolves around the number of turns something takes. For example in the early years of the game (BC) one turn equals about 100 years. Later on in the game this value decreases and one turn may equal 1 or 2 years. Also when you build either a unit, city improvement or a wonder of the world it takes a certain number of turns for the unit, building or wonder to be created. Having more production shields, which can be achieved chiefly by building a city in a mountainous area or by mining the land in that cities city area, decreases this effect. The main aims of the game are winning either scientifically or by war. If you want to win at all however you need to have either the best researches for implements of war or you must strive towards the Gaia Controller which is what you build to create a utopia, this is when the game ends. You must increase the size of your empire by building settlers that you can then use to build cities. Cities built on rivers are best at the start because they give an even amount of food and production shields. You must also attempt to build your empire in a reasonably small space of land because attacks can be fended off more easily. An isolated city is more at risk than a whole conurbation. It is best to start researching as much as possible at the start so put taxes down a bit and also public works down as you don't need public works at this early stage. Attempt to get as many wonders as you can especially the pyramids and other important ones like the Appian Way and the Chitchen Itza. Wonders give you special bonuses like they make your people happy or reduce crime or give you money, so it's always good to have them. Remember always keep your people happy because if they go against you it is very difficult to regain power completely. As you travel through the ages you will be given the option to build city improvements for your city, it's also good to do these as all improvements improve that city by e.g. less crime, happiness etc. With the game comes a research tree and using this you can choose which researches are of most benefit to you at that moment e.g. if you are under attack and the research for musketeers or infantry comes up you should take it. As you explore you will encounter "strange new worlds" and you have the option of diplomacy, to discuss treaties, embargoes, and declarations of war and alliances. There is only one hint here make pacts with strong nations pressurise weaker civilisations, unless some people are really annoying you, then you just take them out later on in the game with say………….. Nukes? There are many different government types you can choose to run your government and you obtain new governments by researching them. They range from the monarchy, communism, democracy, republic and ecotopia and many others. You must choose which suits you best. They all allow a maximum amount of cities in your civilisation and if you're at war don't choose democracy because the blasted senate will overrule your declarations, however if you're lucky the Hawk Party will mess this up and you are free to declare. It is always best to be fair in your trea tment of other civilisations as your rating tumbles if for example you attack without declaring war. Later on in the game you will experience a lot of pollution due to your cities being too productive there is nothing you can do except reset the square and start it again. On your screen you are given a huge map of things, land, sea, civilisation boundaries, trade routes, cities. This is very useful and big and you can easily navigate this map by clicking on the bit you want to go to. Trade plays a large part in the game and you can only create trade routes in cities that have natural resources inside their city radius. You can trade these with other countries by going to the trade tab and pressing trade but each trade route needs a number of caravans to take them there and you have to build them. The caravans are a unit and can be built by cities. As you use public works for roads, mines, irrigation and fisheries your city derives benefit from this and obtains increased food, movement points, production shields. This enables your city to grow and in time your city will increase in size as the population gets bigger; this in turn provides more land→more food→more people→increase in city size and then the process keeps going. It is within your interests to have a larger population as it fills jobs. If you are finding life tough you have the option to put your city in the trusting hands of a mayor. Don't do this unless you really need to because the mayor is rubbish. As time passes and you get more new technologies and units you can build under water and use under water unit's etc and this is unlike any other civ game. This is superb as it gives us an insight into what life could be like in the 3rd millennia. At the end of the game you have either killed all civilisations or won the race for Gaia but the satisfaction of winning or taking part is superb. It even gives you an incentive because you are given a score of how well you have done taking into account all the things you've done. This game is easy to use and comes with a very thorough manual and there are different levels you can play on depending how good you feel you are. There is also a scenario game that you can play scenarios of what happened in history, great fun, all the work's done for you. If there was one downfall it would be its lack of Internet features. You can't play over the net but in fairness it would be very long. This is the best game I have ever played and if you're into strategy games I strongly advise you get this, as it is so in-depth and enthralling.

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              25.02.2001 17:17
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              When I first got this game it was mainly out of wondering what such a game would be like. I love strategy games and have around a dozen other titles but had never bought one similar to this. I decided that at £9.99 I couldn't really lose and went ahead and bought it. The manual was informative enough but I found that it didn't really tell me what the idea of the game was and so it took me around three days to work out the gist of the game and really get working to winning it. There are around 6 levels of difficulty and a variety of different of options to affect what sort of map is generated. You can choose to be the leader of one of about 40 different historical empires, from the Irish to the Japanese. You can choose to play with 2-8 other civilizations and the size of map is also variable from small to absolutely huge. An interesting feature is that you can decide to have the top edges (like the North and South poles) of the map connecting unlike in real life. You can edit the enviroment on the map greatly as well to either make it easier, harder or just more suited to your style of play. If you are looking for graphics, a quality battle generator or good sound don't bother as this is not the idea of the game. it is also annoying that however you do the game, one thing always leads to the same next thing and this greatly reduces the fun and life span of the game. What you will get from CtP2 is reliabilty, a good progressive way of development and an easy to play game. It is all about strategies for building your civilization from 4000BC until approx. 3000AD so don't expect anything else. Another good point for the game is the well worked varying turn length in which your first number of turns are worth 50 years each and then it gradually progresses down to about two years a turn at the present day. This allows the technologies to be quite realistic on the middle level wi th say television being invented roughly as it was historically. Your aim in the game is either to 1) wipe out all the other civilizations that are playing with simple military brute force or to 2) make contact with an alien species in a wormhole and then make it live again. Simple eh? On the first couple of levels then the answer is a solid yes and it took me only around 2 weeks from opening the game to win on the easiest level. However the levels do get harder and soon you may need to work out some really devious strategies to win from virtually nothing. The trouble is it just gets too hard very quickly and there is no real step up each time; it is more like a giant leap. One tip for beginners: build several cities (I aim for at least 6 in the first say 1500 years) early on so that you can really develop quickly. Then just get building wonders in my opinion. Try to avoid long costly wars if there are for than four civs as the other sides will get way ahead and you won't be able to catch up afterwards. If you only do a three civs then there is a fair chance that you will end up with at least one or perhaps two agreeable opponents which always help. If this is the case, befriend them early on and they become devoted to you. Simple really. More difficult when it comes to those who want to fight though. The game does become boring after a couple of months however as there will come a time when you have just seen it all too many times before and there is nothing new to do. Overall, Call to Power is nothing new in the series and if you have any of the previous titles, probably not worth getting.

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                04.02.2001 20:19
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                When Call to Power I appeared, I was, like most Civilization fans, very pleased to see a new entry in the genre. Sadly, once I had installed the game I was rapidly disappointed. The controls were rough, maps limited, scenario and map play none-existent, and the entire game felt like it was totaly unfinished. Thankfully, that is no longer the case. Call to Power II is very very similar to it's predecessor in many ways - comparing the two posters of governments, units and terrain you will notice very few apparent changes, and even some obmissions. However, that is misleading. The whole structure of the game feels more professional now. It is now possible to build your civilisations on pregenerated worlds, with the real world included in the basic set, and some slowly appearing on line, and a map and scenario editor built in. The controls are now easy to use, reports on your cities far better, the map more usable (but not perfect), and the must play one more turn feel that meant Civ II sessions tend to go on till three in the morning back again. It's still not quite perfect. While there is a nice city screen where you can look at the basic stats of all of your cities at once, there is no easy way to get from that screen to the individual city management screens, and there is no way to zoom in on your map of the world, but these are minor quibbles. This is a very good entry in the Civ. series, and will serve well in the the gap before Civ III finally appears.

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                  10.01.2001 21:48
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                  As a big fan of strategy games, the Call To Power series is one of my favorites. The original Civilization: Call To Power (CTP1)was Activision's first try into this world-building arena. Although they used the name Civilization they had nothing to do with the series originally created by Sid Meier and Microprose. The first Call to Power was very disappointing, a flashy interface with little organized structure, a disappointing diplomacy manager as well as a product that was released too early. A patch had to be downloaded a few months later to fix some of the inherent flaws that came with it. It was released too early. A few months ago I heard that Call To Power 2 (CTP2) was about to be released. The graphics looked the same, although there were more units now and the game was focusing more on land and sea, the space realm had been dropped, this was a major annoyance in CTP1. The time line started in 4000 B.C. and ended in 2300 A.D., CTP1 ended in 3000 A.D. While there was no real criticism over the 7000 years in CTP1, the unrealistic part of it was the spacing of the turns. In the early stages, 4000 B.C. until around 0 A.D., turns were around 50 years long, this is understandable as growth and wars were slow and long. As the game continued along, these turns became shorter as war became quicker and people communicated more efficiently in general. Then after 2000 A.D. the turns became longer, this made no sense whatsoever. Is the future going to be slower for the human race??? CTP2 seems to have made a quantum leap forward in strategy gaming. Their newest megalomaniac game has made many positive strides forward. The technology tree is better sequenced, now when a unit is made available you'll be able to use it without it becoming out-of-date in a few turns. The command interface is better thought out this time around, it is more logical, although there could be several improvments. One part of this game that I find annoying deals w ith the building improvements to your cities, such as Aquaducts, City Walls and the like. In order to build certain items, you may need to build something else first that will allow you to build what you want. This tends to make sense, such as a Bazaar before a Bank. No problems there, but what I do find annoying is that there is no indicator telling you what you need to build in order to get to something else. On the Building Menu everything that has been discovered should be listed, but if a particular building needs a prerequisite building it should be greyed out, because, some of this logic is a little confusing. It took me quite a while to figure out that I needed to build a Bank before I could build Televisions. (If anyone can explain this one to me, please do so) I do have high praise for the Diplomacy Manager. Now when another leader contacts you and demands or offers something you can counter-demand or counter-offer. This can lead to some interesting proposals. On top of this there are treaties as well, they cover peace, trade, science and pollution. Combat has also improved. During the early Civilization games, it was possible for a Legion to defeat a tank!! They have now introduced an armor rating for certain units. Now when a healthy sword-bearing army descends on your tired tank platoon....let's just say it's more realistic. Also, the option of retreating has now been realized. The sound effects are good, nothing incredible when units clash in combat, but what do you really need to hear when you can see your opponent being crushed?? The music on the other hand is beautifully done, I can find myself listening to the music in my head throughout the day. Overall the game itself is exceptional, it has that one-more-turn addiction. I'm already suffering some late nights from playing this one.

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