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Civilization 2 (PC)

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21 Reviews
  • Main game isn't multiplayer
  • played on dos.
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    21 Reviews
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      27.09.2012 17:39
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      A fantastic strategy game that continues to appeal

      Civilization 2 must rank as one of the best computer games of all time and is certainly about the best strategy game ever made. It builds on the strengths of the original, groundbreaking game and adds better graphics more variety and improved gameplay.

      The game begins in the bronze age and your first task is to use your single settler unit to found a city in a suitable place. You then commence your journey to modern civilisation (and beyond), conquering your rivals, researching new technology and building wonders of the world. It is simply fascinating to watch your cities and troops gradually upgrade as you develop and your borders push further afield. The aim of the game is to either become the only civilisation remaining or by building a spaceship and reaching Alpha Centauri. Upon doing so the game grades your efforts and, in a nice touch, gives you a title such as "the magnificent" or "the pitiful" (if you haven't done so well!).

      One nice touch is that you can consult your advisers each turn. These offer advice on different areas of your dominion such as military, economics, diplomacy etc. and are represented by little videos offering tidbits of info on the current state of affairs. Their continual demands, bickering and catchphrases do a lot to add humour to the game.

      Civilization 2 has been installed on at least one of my computers since it's release in the late nineties and when I fancy some retro gaming it us one of the first I go to. It remains great gun to play, with no two run throughs ever being the same and an active community still churning out new maps and scenarios. While I have played the sequels I have found them over reliant on flashy graphics and new gameplay gimmicks without having the charm of this rdition.

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      29.11.2009 20:18
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      fantastic game can be snapped up cheap.

      As a rule my favourite type of game is one where you have to put some thought in to get something out of it, of course, sometimes you just feel like blowing hordes of zombies away with a shotgun but generally speaking I am a strategy fan at heart.

      Civilization 2 is an incredible strategy game, with the focus being on empire expansion and the obliteration of your enemies through a mixture of military might and diplomatic superiority.

      The game is viewed top down, as if the camera was hovering miles in the air and at a slight angle. The graphics are poor but this is more than made up for in sheer gameplay.

      The game is turn based and the map is a little bit like a chess board, in that its divided up into thousands of squares (or tiles as they're known), each tile has different properties such as...

      -Food Production (how much food will be produced after farms have been built).
      -Movability (how many movement points will be spent traversing over this tile).
      -Defense Bonus (for example hills will grant any unit stationed on that tile a boost of upto 75% to their defense.
      -Shield Production (the number of shields generated per settlement per turn is directly linked to the speed in which buildings and units are built by that settlement).



      On starting up the game you select from a random map, a premade map or you can load a premade scenario, such as world war 2 or expansion of the roman empire.

      Then select your country, there are loads of nations to choose from each with their own starting technologies, strengths and weaknesses. Then choose your title, emperor, sir, king etc, and enter a name.

      Now your ready to start playing. As you start the map, your only unit is a settler (used to establish new settlements). The map is completely black and so exploration is required to find suitable places to settle. Preferably close to water and near certain resources that provide your settlement with a bonus. For example a large bunch of grapes will increase food production while spices will increase trade.

      Once you've established your first town the game falls into a bit of a cycle, namely...

      -Build buildings that will improve your settlement, some enable the construction of military units, some keep your citizens happy and keep them from revolting and some will boost the research done by that settlement. Also, grand projects or wonders as their known in the game, can be undertaken, they take a lot longer to build than your average buil;ding but bestow your tribe with powerful bonuses including increased research, faster production and a stronger economy.

      -Research new technologies, some military based, some socially based and some economically based.

      -Build up an army to defend your settlement and to go out and conquer new settlements.

      -Build a new settler to establish further colonies.

      -Develop those new colonies with buildings......and so on.

      Although this may sound like a monotonous process, the game has enough variation in buildings, research and unit types that it manages to stay fresh. Each settlement can be constructed with a sole aim in mind, you can build a settlement that purely focuses on military construction or one that excels in research and so on.

      Diplomacy is handled well, various trades, treaties and pacts can be signed. Ally with one nationality while demanding tribute from another. The computer controlled factions behave realistically especially on the harder difficulty settings. Seeming to know exactly when to attack, when to grovel for a cease fire, when to defend and when to cut their losses.

      The game runs from about 2000 B.C until 9999 A.D although in practice you will not likely play passed about 4000 A.D as it would take an eternity. The games technologies continue to advance to around the level of the modern day, i.e nuclear weapons, supermarkets, power stations, Motorways etc.

      Civ 2 is far from a quick pick up & play sort of game, with sessions lasting over the course of a few weeks at times (not non stop, lol). In fact a good description of Civ 2 is chess meets resource management meets full blown warfare.

      A definate reccomendation to strategy lovers who are looking for a bit of a challenge.

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      21.10.2008 22:39
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      Simply put - highly addictive and extremely deep strategy game that's not to be missed

      Ahhhhhhhh Civilization II, the 2nd in Sid Meier's highly addictive and challenging series of video games based on the "evolution" of man from ancient times to the present and beyond. Being a huge fan of the series from the start i am probably more than a little biased when i say it is one of the best series of games ever created by anyone. You start out in ancient times as 1 of several tribes and you build your civilization to try to stand the test of time, and the test of the other civilizations wanting what you have and not being afraid to take it. The game can be won several different ways: Culture; Domination; The Space Race; Etc. Along the way you will research new technologies and build new structures that will enhance your civilization and make it more productive. You will also need to have plenty of military units in order to protect what you have built, which require the building of certain structures and the researching of certain technologies to produce. Workers build roads and mines and irrigate to further advance your civilization and explorers scour the map to reveal unexplored territory as well as make contact with the rival civilizations. Diplomacy is as big a part of this game as warfare, maybe even bigger. You definitely don't want all the rival civilizations against you at the same time or you probably won't survive for long, and having a strong ally or two is always a plus. As you advance through the ages you can keep up with how well you are doing on the many pages of stats in the game and you have advisors to assist you in the areas you need the most advancement in. In the city view you can decide what production the city is currently engaged in and set your citizens to work in the spaces surrounding your city to maximize efficiency, you can also take some citizens out of the labor force and make them entertainers to make the city happier, which is very important to the production of the city and your overall score at the end. You can trade resources and technology with other civilizations as well, but be careful, smart civilizations will try to take advantage of you if you let them. Build Wonders of the World to increase your civilizations culture and recieve bonuses. Destroy your enemies or make peace, become the most cultured or most technologically advanced and be the first to reach outer-space, it's really up to you as to what your civilization becomes. Definitely one of the deepest turn-based strategy games ever produced and absolutely a must have for any strategy gamer.

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      08.03.2006 14:46

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      8/10

      Civ 2 is one of those games were, it is confusing at the begining but when you he hang of it is very addictive.
      The Gameplay
      the gameplay is very can be quick and very slow depending how good you have become. The game takes up many hours to actuly discover technogly and weapons that become very useful. The game starts in BC but slowly it goes up into AD. Make sure to beware of barbarians and other Civs espeically the romans because they always are blood thirsty

      Graphics
      The graphics are not good but the gameplay makes up for it.

      GroJam

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      27.04.2003 21:16
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      This game is just so absorbing you can spend hours and hours and hours playing it - it becomes most tempting when you should be doing something else (eg revision) and you find yourself planning world conquest at the most inconvenient times (eg in exams!). It might look quite old-fashioned now, compared to later editions of the same game and PS2/X-Box/Gamecube console games, but it still offers challenging gameplay and you get to be ruler of the world! Take that Tony Hawk/Mario Sunshine! The complexity of this game is summed up in the manual - not an instruction leaflet, a 200-page book! If you are new to the game it is sensible to try and read at least some of the book first, or like me and everyone else you can jump in and muddle through. You will take ten times as long to work out how to do things and probably return, admit defeat, and read the start-up tutorial section of the book. Everything then becomes a lot clearer! Civ is a "God Game" - you control the fate of a civilization from its beginning to when, if you are a success, it covers the earth and you as leader are all powerful. This game appeals to the military dictator in all of us! War is not the only way to win – you can either wipe out all other civilizations or you can try and beat them into space and send colonists to Alpha Centuri to found a new world. You can go for a world the computer sets up for you or you can design your own – down to map creation, nationalities of your opponents, whether the climate is warm or temperate…you get a very unique game to your specification. In Civ you start out with one little settler (If you are very lucky you might start out with two) with which to found your first city. You can either go with the suggested city name or create your own. Thus I ended up with my capital being named Bobtown (I must not listen to my sister’s suggestions). She has had an entire civilization with all the cities being named aft
      er Salmon – Salmontown, Salmonville, Salmonia, New Salmon, Los Salmon. As she demonstrates your madness can be directly transferred to your civilization. You need several cities to really get started and you can end up with hundreds depending on how much you expand. Cities use the surrounding terrain to generate money, food to grow and “shields” with which to build things. You can build units such as settlers to produce more cities and improve your land, or military units like archers and, as your technology develops, nuclear weapons! You can also build city improvements such as walls to protect yourself, factories to improve production, temples to make your citizens happy. Finally you can build Wonders. These are big, expensive projects but they are very useful. They have different effects – the Great Wall of China makes other civilizations always offer peace in negotiations, the Hoover Dam gives every city a hydro plant, Leonardo’s Workshop updates your units as technology develops, Cure for Cancer makes your citizens happy. Wonders are an aid to a civilization’s development and give you extra points at the end. You can spend hours and hours watching your cities grow and your territory expand, fighting wars with your neighbours and maybe then building a space ship to take to the stars. You can set levels of hardness – on the easiest you get given advice and your people are generally happy. On harder levels there are roving tribes of barbarians, your people are hard to please and neighbouring civilizations are stronger and cleverer. You can of course take the cowards way out and cheat. Once you cheat you can alter the land around your cities, create units from thin air, destroy competing civilizations and cheat technology advances. Your final score will be a lot lower as a result of cheating, and it is not as much fun as doing it yourself but it is an option. This game is one of my favourites. It
      shows that you do not need flashy graphics if you have a strong idea and good gameplay. The maps may look a bit boring and old fashioned but once you have built an empire from scratch over several days on it you don’t really care. This gives hours of challenging fun and leaves you feeling both that you have achieved something, and that you can take over the world. Not many games leave you with that feeling when you win (except maybe Monopoly). Now if only they produced a version of Civ where you accumulate paper money and little cards with your city names on them…

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        16.07.2002 10:29
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        I wonder if anyone remembers Dave's Classics? Back in the days when the internet was still something of a wild frontier (pause for venerable Davy Crockett joke), that website was the place to go for those interested in the arcade emulation scene. Never really my bag - 8-bit micros are my thing - but it did its job well. Until the lawyers got going, of course - go there now and you'll be lucky to see even the regulation bit of tumbleweed trundle across the screen. Anyway, it would seem that I'm rapidly turning into Dooyoo's very own Dave's Classics, though in a rather different sense. Ye olde games acrosse ye yeares are falling under my iron-hard judgement. (What? *That* olde? What about bronze-hard? *Flint*??? You have *got* to be joking. Look, I need to get on. We'll talk about this later.) And one of the greatest of them all (no, not Grand Prix Legends, incredibly) is Civilization II. By some distance the oldest commercial computer game I still play (the *absolute* oldest is Noughts and Crosses on my EDSAC Simulator - celebrating its fiftieth this year), this wonderful turn-based strategy game is a fine embodiment of the triumph of gameplay over graphics. Oh yes. I did say "turn-based". That's a phrase that's about as popular in today's climate as "point-and-click adventure", "EGA graphics" or "Railtrack approved", but that's unfair. Turn-based strategy (TBS) and real-time strategy (RTS) are two very different genres, and despite the obsession with RTS over the last five years, it's rather ridiculous to elevate one above the other without even considering the quality of individual titles. RollerCoaster Tycoon is a superb game, but it demands very different mental qualities from Civ II. The premise of Civ II is simple - you are the controller of one of several (between three and seven) "tribes", starting way back in 4000 BC, and your aim is to ri
        se to the status of world leading power, either by means of becoming the first nation to land a spaceship successfully on Alpha Centauri (wouldn't it be a bit hot, though?) or, in time-honoured fashion, through the utter annihilation of all your enemies and the conquest of the entire world (the appropriately-named "bloodlust" option). There is also the possibility of making it through to the end of the game (AD 2020) with no conclusive result having been reached. In this case, you don't exactly win and you don't exactly lose either. Right then, let's assume that you've plodded your way through the clump of questions that are fired at you as soon as you run the game (who are you? Where do you come from? How big a world do you want? How many other tribes? What's the capital of Liechtenstein?[1] And so on) you'll find yourself looking at a largely black screen with (probably) just one blinking settler icon in the middle of it. If you're lucky, the computer will suggest that "this looks like a good place to build a city" - it's usually best to trust it here. Hooray! Your civilisation is on its way. Of course, you're not going to get all that far with one settler, are you? And in fact, it disappears once you've built your city, so now you have no units at all. Oh dear. Happily, salvation is at hand. Every square within two moves of the city (the "city radius") can be put to work for the greater glory of your tribe, whether it be for growing food, producing raw materials ("shields") or enhancing trade prospects - a good network of trade routes is crucial once contact has been established with your rivals. (Having said that, if you've been stupid enough to build in the middle of a windswept glacier, you might as well quit now and start again.) Shield production is tremendously important, as it is this that allows you to build things, which come in three classe
        s - units, city improvements and Wonders (that capital letter made you sit up, didn't it, eh?). The types of units available to you depend on how scientifically advanced (see later) your civilisation is - at the start of the game you may only be able to produce basic settler and phalanx units; by the time the space age rolls around, though, you may be able to shower nuclear missiles around like there's no tomorrow (which there probably won't be with that amount of radiation around). City improvements are buildings such as temples (which reduce your citizens' unhappiness), banks (which increase your wealth), factories (which improve productivity), city walls (which improve defence strength) and so on. As with the units, the further into the game you get and the more scientifically advanced your tribe, the more powerful the improvements you can make to your cities, even to the extent of protecting against nuclear attack. Wonders are, by their very nature, impressive constructions, and though they will take hard work and sustained effort to build, you will reap the rewards many times over. As an example, let's look at the most powerful Wonder of them all, Leonardo's Workshop. If you control this Wonder, every time a unit becomes obsolete (for example, when musketeers are outmoded by riflemen), *all* your newly past-it units will be automatically upgraded for free. It's a tremendously powerful Wonder, and I suggest you put everything into getting hold of it before a rival does. If you fail... well, I'd suggest a spot of military action against the city that does build it might be on the cards. Other Wonders can give you powers such as greatly increased morale among your people (happiness is a very important factor in Civ II, and neglecting it can bring down your government), the ability to steal knowledge from your enemies, the power to make nuclear missiles or the chance to improve the speed of your ships. Watc
        h out, though, as many of the Wonders (including Leonardo's Workshop) will stop working when they are left behind by the onward march of technology - and you don't want to suddenly be caught out with less power than you thought you had. Science, as you'll have gathered by now, is something you cannot afford to neglect. Scientific advances will open the way for your tribe to produce more powerful units, more effective city improvements and even better Wonders. And, of course, if you hope to win by the spaceship route, things become even more crucial. You can send spies to attempt to steal technology from your rivals, but this will have dire diplomatic consequences for you if they are discovered, especially if your nations are supposed to be at peace. Diplomacy? Yes indeed - even if you have decided to win by conquering the world, your civilisation is unlikely to be the world's strongest all through the game, particularly on the higher difficulty levels, so just wading in with all guns blazing might well see you annihilated rather quickly. What you need to do is to learn the necessary skills to play one rival off against another, to exchange knowledge and gold, to form - and break - alliances... in short, all the paraphernalia of international diplomacy. All the nations in the game have different "personalities", which means that a strategy that results in one country paying you extravagant tribute, when attempted against a different opponent might well see your empire pounded under the massed guns of several armies. You'll need to learn just how far you can push the various leaders before they decide that enough is enough and turn on you. Oh, and don't expect them to honour treaties if you can't be bothered to either. Perhaps the most important secret to the longevity of Civ II is the flexible way in which it can be altered and extended. The basic rules - such as how far various units may move,
        which scientific advances lead to which new units and how much roads will speed travel - are held in a plain-text ASCII file, which is laid out in such a way as to be very easy to edit. The graphics for the units themselves are held in ordinary GIF files, and though they're rather fiddly to alter, many people have created complete new sets. And new maps - from the British Isles through Bosnia to Ancient Greece - can be designed with ease. The ultimate expression of this customisability is the scenario. Here, a starting position is provided (say Western Europe in May 1940, just after the fall of France), and the player can opt to play any one of several sides - can you change history and win the Battle of Britain for Germany? Or can you subject the whole of the continent to the Soviet yoke? (Would that make the place a mere shell? Ahem, sorry.) Usually you are given an objective, consisting of a certain number of cities that must be captured, perhaps within a specified timescale. Often scientific advance is slowed or even stopped to prevent, for example, the development of cruise missiles in Roman times. There are many, many more intricacies to Civilization II, but it would take ten times as many words to even scratch the surface. There are even full-scale addon packs (Fantastic Worlds and the Gold pack that allows multiplayer), which you used to need to use a lot of the third-party addons... but now some kind person has done a freeware clone of the necessary files - isn't that great? (I'm not giving a specific URL because it's available via all the good Civ II addon sites.) This game is six - *six* years old this year. That's practically primeval by the standards of the PC game industry. Yet its gameplay is so perfectly balanced between realism and enjoyment (better, I think, than its successors Call to Power, Alpha Centauri and Civ III) that it's going to be a valued part of my game collection for a good while yet
        . System Requirements: Well, pretty damn low, unsurprisingly. I used to have a little eight-meg 486 DX2/50 with a 12-inch VGA monitor, and while it chugged just a little once the maps got really big, and you had to turn off the cut-scene animations (no great loss) as they need 16 megs, it was completely playable on such a setup. You can't say that about many games nowadays. [1] Vaduz.

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          01.07.2002 17:09
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          I think that the best Wonders of the World are the ones which improve science, directly or indirectly, or hasten expansion. Below I have listed those which I think are important to build if you plan on having a Fundamentalist government which is favoured, and given reasons why they should be aimed for. Pyramids - Expansion twice as quick; instead of building granaries, libraries or universities can be built. 8/10 Hanging Gardens - These are not needed for Fundamentalism, but provide a brief stop-gap in Monarchy while waiting for the Statue of Liberty. This allows you to build cities and have two workers working straight away, which would not be possible otherwise, due to unhappiness and the need for an entertainer. 8/10 Statue of Liberty - You can use this to get to a Fundamentalist government way before you can research the advance of Fundamentalism. 9/10 Copernicus' Observatory, and Isaac Newton's College - Try to place these in the same city, one which already has a decent science output. 7/10 Michelangelo's Chapel - Many strategists name this as a good WotW for Democracy. In Fundamentalism, it is a greatly changed WotW. Instead of converting unhappy people to content, it supplies each city with 3 gold as "tithes" per turn. With over a hundred cities... I'll let you work that one out for yourselves! 9/10 Leonardo's Workshop - Definitely the best Wonder of the World in the game. Its effects completely tilt a game, especially if you are the recipient. It is just a pity it does not upgrade Artillery to Howitzers (it is obsolete by then). 10/10 Eiffel Tower - This is useful with a Fundamentalist government as with all the money I receive from the government type, I find there is a temptation to bribe a few cheap cities. 7/10 Hoover Dam - This has two benefits for your civilization, with the second being possibly the most useful. It i) increases production in those t
          owns with factories, and ii) cuts down markedly on pollution. 10/10 Seti Program - The effects of this are tremendous. Instead of receiving technologies every, say, 3 turns, this allows you then to get them every 2 turns. It does not half your time for getting advances - it works out at a 33.3% reduction. 10/10 Apollo Program - The opportunity to build this wonder depends largely on how far in front, or behind, the other civilizations are in the game. If I was leading in the quest for technologies, I would buy this straight away with the money I would be raking in from tithes. However, if you are behind your opponents, and they have begun to build it, delay it all costs! Sabotage its production and catch up first. 8/10 I think the above Wonders of the World are imperative to your Civilization. One WotW which I would apply a very low score to would be the Great Wall (2/10). It is a great wonder while you have it, but once its effects have ran out (Metallurgy), you are left unprepared for any onslaught from enemies, unless of course you build city walls while you have the Great Wall, which to me seems to slow down expansion. Also, whatever you do, do not build the Manhattan Project - it is a recipe for disaster (0/10), as its tactical uses for the AI far outweigh its benefits for you. (This self-written strategy guide first appeared on my Civilization 2 website that was taken off the net around 18 months ago)

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            23.05.2002 02:40
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            This game gives you the ability to do something what would be almost imposible to do, Rule The World!!! You have the power to play god and change history in your hands. You can do things like keeping the Roman Empire alive and making the British Empire rule the world under your rule and laws. You can travel through 8000 years of adventure and power and become the mightiest empire in the world! You can use the cheat mode when you are bored to creat whatever you want from entire armies of men to hugh moutain ranges! Although on my game I have completed all victorys from the mightiest empire, the peacfulest empire and I have completed all the Gaia components but I still have not completed the game so I think that the instuctions could be better but over all the information using the "Great Libiry" is extremly usful. I think this game is a briliant statergy game of great potentual and it is better in many ways to the newer verions of it like "Civerlisaions III" because its easyer to understand.

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              24.01.2002 19:27
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              • "Main game isn't multiplayer"

              Imagine a game where you call the shots. One that is different every time, stretches your imagination to the extremes and keeps you longing for more. I know it’s cheesy but this game is all that and so much more. Civ 2 is the brainchild of Sid Meir who completed the first version in 1990. It is made by Firaxis Games, and has won many awards. This game is my personal all-time favourite. It really is a fantastic game and you’ll love it if you like strategy games. There’s also a lot of scope for customising the rules, and the actual game itself, by building you own worlds, choosing the difficulty level and how many opponents you have. The actual game itself is about controlling your own civilisation – I bet that was a shock to you all. You can choose which race you are from Romans to Greeks, English to the Sioux. You start the game with a lowly settler, in 4000BC, whose main priority is to build a new city but can be used later in the game for irrigation, mining and road building. This first city becomes the centre of an empire and from here its up to you; whether you focus on expanding your nation, conquering your enemies, set up trade with other colonies or build a spaceship, the choice and variety is extensive and provides hours of entertainment. The game is enabled to allow you to form alliances or provoke war, to become technologically advanced or complete the first mission into space. This game is excellent and from my point of view should be rated at least 9/10, if not 10/10. Don’t however just take my word for it, play the game yourself. However there are a few warnings that I would like to give you: don’t send triremes (ancient boats) out into the sea – keep them close to the sure. Remember to always have at least one, preferably two or three good defensive military units fortified in your city. Always clean up pollution otherwise all your hard work irrigating city
              squares will be wasted. Finally expand and conquer! (They really are the most important words to keep firmly in your mind)

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                12.10.2001 02:02
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                Civilisation II could well be the greatest strategy computer game ever invented. The brainchild of Sid Meier this game allows you to oversee and run the development of a civilisation from it's foundation until 2020, or before if you conquer the entire globe or succeed in the space race. It is a deeply complicated and absorbing game which takes alot of getting used to, but if you put the effort in you can gain serious satisfaction. Civ II was originally a Microprose release and it has spawned a number of sequels and related games, not to mention cheap rip-offs. Alpha Centauri was the follow up from Sid Meier (the original creator of the game), Civ II: Call To Power came from Activision but neither offered much in the way of improvement on the original format. Alpha Centauri looked weird and much of the fun of the original game was controlling real Earth based civilisations, not strange factions on alien planets. You begin the game with a measly settler unit and must build cities and nurture your growing population. The range of features is astounding. You have the option to choose random maps, downloaded maps, real earth maps or ones you have created yourself. You then select a civilisation from a fairly wide selection including Egyptian, Roman, French , English or even Mongol. There are others but unfortunately no Scots (although you can create custom civilisations and choose your own city names). To begin with the map is mostly covered and you must explore to find suitable city spots and meet other civilisations. Cities need resources and these are displayed in a fairly simple format in terms of graphics. You can build a variety of different units for trade, building and improvements, diplomacy, and of course for warfare. The buildings and units you can build increase as you develop scientific breakthroughs. You choose what to research and the level of science you acheive is dictated by science ratings in the city, buildings and ce
                rtain wonders. Wonders of the world take a long time to build and have a variety of positive effects on your civilisation. There is so much information in the game that I can only cover a fraction here but a large handbook is provided explaining the game concepts and how to progress, there is also a civilopedia in the game which tells you all you need to know about the different units, government types and buildings. As in real life you tax the population and spend the money wherever you think best. What percentage to use on research, luxuries and whatever you spend on completing buildings or units quickly. This will also be affected by your government type, which range from despotism to democracy. Each allows different speeds of development and research and all have different effects on the happiness and behaviour of your population. One of the most enjoyable features of the game is diplomacy. You must interact with other civilisations in the game. Some will threaten you and demand money, others will exchange knowledge, you may be able to foster good relations and forge alliances or you may end up with every other nation of the world against you in an all out war. Tactics are up to you, friendly traders, developed and rich or imperialistic and acquisitive. Usually it will require a mixture of these to win. There are a couple of ways to win the game, in a normal game it will be the first civilisation that builds and sends a spaceship to Alpha Centauri successfully that wins. However it is possible to select the bloodlust option which means you must conquer the entire world. To add to the difficulty there is pollution to deal with (especially bad if anyone uses a nuke) and barbarian uprisings. The game is huge and on a normal map will probably take a good five hours to complete, on huge it can take days. The beauty of it is the detail, you become completely immersed in your civilisation, deciding where to build next, trying to complete a ro
                ad network and attacking enemy cities. There are a number of different levels of gameplay and you have to juggle all of them. The game is turn based so it passes round each player and they make all their moves before the next one goes, and so on until the end. Civ II improved on Civ I by adding units, buildings and video clips which run when you build a wonder. There are also extra diplomatic possibilities although these are annoyingly limited after a while. The graphics are not majorly impressive but everything looks more or less like it should. The sound is good for the units, gunfire and shouting when riflemen attack, the sound of bombing for bombers etc. The music is poor and must be turned off after a while, although it is better than most games. Ultimately this game stands the test of time really well, the gameplay is so absorbing and constant that you can easily spend days of your life zombified in front of the computer. The only other game I have gone back to as much as this is probably champ man, although I prefer the new versions of that, while with Civ II the original is best. You could get this for a tenner easy, maybe even a fiver and it is well worth getting. However if you really want to get into it persistence is important, there are six levels of difficulty to choose from so start out easy, Deity is horribly difficult. The main bad point about this game for me is that it eats time, you can't just play for half an hour and come back later. It takes time to settle into the game and to pick it up again when you've been away and consequently I have found it works best when you set aside a whole day and complete it. Just watch out for the onset of blindness or exploding bladders. I prefer to play the game in the bloodlust mode as the space race gets boring, late on you tend to end up with loads of cities building parts and nothing else to do but wait for it to finish. At least with conquest, although painstaki
                ngly slow and difficult at times, you are constantly having to think strategically. There are also certain wonders which I consider essential (at least for playing on the higher levels). Firstly Leonardo's Workshop which automatically upgrades all your military units, this prevents that city you forgot about being invaded by tank and having only a pikeman and archer to defend it. Secondly, The Great Library which allows you to gain access to any newly developed knowledge as soon as two or more other civilisations have it, this prevents you falling behind in the science race. Thirdly, Women's Suffrage which allows units to go to war without the host city becoming unhappy, you really need this if you intend to wage war on everyone. I have never found a game as satisfying as this in the strategy/ God genre. The ability to choose actual civilisations and attack other ones is really enjoyable. There are also scenarios available, such as WW2 or Napoleon's conquest, these are fun but miss out the really great starting out bit, where you can explore a virgin world and spread your seeds of victory across it. A brilliant game that everyone interested in strategy or God type games should own. No one has yet reached this high tide mark, although I hear Civ III will be out at the end of October and they have re-united the original civ team with Meier so that should be worth looking out for.

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                  08.09.2001 20:29
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                  I liked this game a lot The gameplay area is huge with room on it for up to seven different civilisations one of which will be your own. I thought the graphics were a bit basic and it was quite fiddley to move your characters about with the mouse over a long period of time. You can play with anything up to the seven civilsations, and I found that the game was more exciting if you played with the full compliment, otherwise you find yourself having to explore vast areas before you can find anyone to attack. There is a lot of management needed to make the game work well for you, and the more cities you build the more complex this becomes. The good thing is that once you have set a city to complete a task you can leave it and the computer will tell you when it has accomplished that task. You need to get your cities to work on things that will improve life for the residents, otherwise the city will fall into anarchy and be useless to you. Cities also produce the military and other units that you move around the map and fight other civs with. You also get cities to work on 'Wonders of the World' if you succeeed in building on of these then you will receive technology advances before the other civs. You can work your way up through the ages until you can get to the point where you can launch nuclear attacks if you are in a bad mood! If the early stages are a little slow for your liking there is a fcility for an accelaerated start up. There is also a range of maps on which you can be play, but it has to be said that this is not an extensive selection.

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                    03.09.2001 19:04
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                    Civ 2 is basically an updated version of the original. It has seriously improved graphics into a 3 dimensional isometric viewpoint and with more technological advancements than in the original. You begin with one settler and through directing your civilization to advance and expand you can build a hugely successful race. Your overall aim is to keep your civilization alive primarily and eventually allow the movement into and colonization of space. Their are four impulses of civilization and you must elect how to plough your resources into each of them to encourage the advancement of your civilization. Exploration The game starts off with the screen covered in black and as you move your units about you get to uncover more. You meet other races and interact; trading and fighting to become top dog. Economics Eventually you have to tax the people of your settlements and plough the money into research and defence etc.. you need to make priorities which are often difficult Knowledge You must balance taxes against science and it is difficult at times to know what is immediately important; advancement or the ability to build stuff from said advancement. Conquest Defeating your enemies leaves you to freely expand and develop and eventually get to space. Taking their cities can gain you fast advancement and gold. The game at first seems formidable and as you increase in knowledge (within the game) the complexity increases. This is exemplified by the size of the game manual and as such this game will only appeal to older children and adolescents who have the patience to persevere and give the game a chance. Overall I think this is an excellent game and it is quite right that it is perceived as a classic. I highly recommend this game to you if you like strategy or god games. If you are not a fan of said genres and would like to be then do not start with this game try real time gam
                    es which are more action packed first and build up to this tunr based games which is more calm due the lags and logical due to the number of rules. Either way sooner or later give this game a go!

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                    07.08.2001 02:30
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                    This is probably the best game in the world if you have 2 hours of so that you want to kill. It is easy, when you are into the game to go on and on and on. The graphics are quite good. The city View option is cool but doesn't look realistic. I enjoy working my way through the game. My favorite civilisations are the Romans or the Egyptions. There are many different civilisations to choose from. The only really differ in what knowlege you start out with and the basic rular name. The units are good. It is most fun to attack archers with riflemen. The navel units are brilliant. I would like some more tanks though. The basic aim of the game is to become the dominant civilisation. There are many other things you can do along the way. The game will often end when a civilisation reaches oute space and collonises its first planet. You can keep on playing after that but there is nothing else to achieve you score won't carry on rising. What can be annoying is if you launch you space ship then another civilisation comes and makes theirs faster and beats you to the planet. I definatly enjoy this game. Even more so because it was a present! Worth owning but only if you like strategy games. Its a game where you want just one more go! I must also quicky mention the map editor. It is rather difficult to create a map and i prefer to let the computer create a random map. The i can really explore.

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                      30.07.2001 22:10
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                      • "played on dos."

                      I have played civ 2 for the playstation and though this is ok game. So i went out and bought civ 2 for my pc, and i wish had not wasted my money. I am sure that newer versions of this game are good and have excellent graphics and game play, but sadly civ 2 doesn't. This game is played in DOS, which alone makes it odd, as the manual was on the disk as well and was a good 100 hundred pages long i decided to skip it. I thought that it would have help on the game itself if it was i couldnot find it. I never really knew what i was doing after sending a few armies to explore and build a few things i began to realise that i was hopeless at this game as i still did not understand the controls, where my armies were going never mind how to control them. The graphics were awful as well as the general game play. Perhaps this was my own fault as i did not read the manual but for most games now it is not a necessity. I bought this game when it was a classic and was disappointed though this could because i am used to newer games and the more sophisicated graphics and gameplay. Civilisation is a good game and one that will get a player hooked. But i would recommend that people buy the newer versions of the game, and let civ 2 stay where it belongs in the memeroies of those who bought it when it was just released.

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                        14.06.2001 19:42

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                        Civilisations is the best strategy game I have come across in recent years. Everybody talks about Command and conquer but It hasen't got the background behind it live Civ. The graphics are not the cream of the crop but so what it is a stratergy game. The in game war scenarios are good and accurate as land advantage like mountains count to your advantage. Unlike real life however it is not boring and you can reak haveck on the world. You advance technically at about the right speed quickly at the beginning and slow as the advances are more difficult to research. You can also play multi-player on the same computer which is a big advances.

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