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Medieval II: Total War (PC)

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Genre: Strategy - Historical / Video Game for Windows XP / Release Date: 2006-11-10 / Published by Sega

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    13 Reviews
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      29.09.2011 15:49
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      Fantastic strategic game with little enjoyable missions

      Medieval 2: Total War is a fantastic strategy game which you can jump straight into as you have your own advisor who instructs you through the game and you can click on a settlement and ask the advisor for advice on what to build or recruit next. The game is based on turns (where you are only allowed to take a certain number of actions with a character per a turn) and an excellent opportunity to learn a little history about the discoveries during the medieval era and enjoy the missions that are given to you. The game allows you to play a grand campaign- where you have to hold at least 45 regions and Jerusalem or Constantinople etc- depending on which faction you choose to be or a short campaign version where you only have to hold 15 regions but have to eliminate another specific faction for example if your Scotland you have to eliminate England by a certain number of turns. You can play single player or multi-player online. Medieval 2 allows you to build alliances, marry your princesses off to another faction (strengthening alliances), attack other factions (and occupy or sack their settlements), change tax levels of a settlement (unless it's a castle), recruit diplomats, merchants, priests, assassins etc. You can even ask the Pope to launch a crusade- but this depends on your standing with the Pope which depends on you answering to the little missions he might give you. You have to have strike the right balance as too many castles means whilst you may have more protection you have potentially reduced income and too many wars means that whilst you may potentially capture more regions (or end up losing some of your own) you lose revenue via trade with those nations your at war with and high tax levels in settlements where the people are not content invites rebellion. Not having enough income means that you will not be able to sustain your army or build new buildings making it harder to reach the objectives of the game. One of the advantages of this game is that you get to fight battles yourself or you have the choice to automatically resolve the battle so you can just get on with the strategic element of the game. The only negative that I do see with Medieval 2: Total war is that in between turns it can take some time (where it shows you what's happening among the different nations) especially as you get more into the game when you just actually want to get straight back into the game.

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      05.09.2011 23:56
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      Another good, if safe, strategy game that I recommend!

      'Medieval 2: Total War' is a PC game that came out in 2006, as part of the successful strategy series, 'Total War', by developers Creative Assembly. This game is essentially a remake of 'Medieval: Total War', the second game in the series, but updated with the game engine used in 'Rome: Total War' (which I have previously reviewed and enjoyed a lot, along with the original 'Medieval'). As with the other titles, 'Medieval 2' combines a hybrid style of gameplay with a 'Risk'-style, turn-based campaign where you conquer the known map with your military prowess and real-time battle scenes that pit huge armies against each other. This time the period is the Middle Ages, ranging from 1085 right through to the discovery of the New World in the fifteenth century, so much broader than the previous games. In the main campaign mode players choose a faction from Medieval Europe including the English, French, Turkish, Egyptians and Russians among others. On the map they start off with a small number of factions in their control and they must conquer as much of the known world as possible (at least 50 provinces in the "Long Campaign") by building up armies of units preferably led by a general from your royal family. You also must manage your faction's economy, diplomacy between other factions and, if your country is a Christian one, keeping the Pope's favour by building churches and not harming your Christian neighbours (yeh right!). As your faction advances in power and age, you get access to gunpowder and even get the chance to explore the New World, which involves fighting the Aztec tribes and then some. This game has quite a few more features than in 'Rome: Total War' which I shall mention. Firstly as well as other agent units such as a spies, assassins and diplomats there are also now merchants and princess. Merchants are new to the series as a whole, and they are used to trade certain goods located around the map for a small amount of money each turn they stand on the icon. They also have the opportunity to seize the assets of merchants from rival factions which will help gain skills as well as whatever they were trading, but the same can also happen to your merchants too! Princesses were in the original 'Medieval' game and serve the same purpose here, as they both carry out regular negotiation like diplomats and can be married to nobles of other factions or have men from your own faction approach her for marriage. The former can seal alliances between factions, the latter allows young generals to join your royal family and bear children. Both these additions are nice touches to the gameplay although it does involve a bit more micromanaging as you move merchants around to find goods worth the most money. Furthermore religion has a huge impact in this game. With Christian nations you need to keep the Pope happy by building churches, keeping a Christian majority in each province and not attacking Christian factions while crushing the Muslim/Papal provinces. Doing so keeps your Papal Favour high and lets you have great influence over electing the next pope who will be more lenient with your Christian conquests. Conversely, neglecting your religious duties and wantonly attacking Christian factions will cause Papal Favour to drop and the Pope may even excommunicate you, resulting in your Christian neighbours to freely attack you until you're forgiven. It adds another layer of difficulty to the game as you can't attack easy pickings for the kill until you make your way towards the papal state of Rome (it's a requirement to control that city) and then you can fully control the papal elections in your favour. However one negative aspect of religion are the inquisitors who travel around the map; these nasty guys will put your generals and agents on trial for heresy and if they are found guilty the inquisitor will execute them so you lose them for good. What annoys me here is that you can't tell how pious some types of units are and I can't make them less susceptible to heresy- it is dependent on chance really. As with 'Rome: Total War' when two battles meet up on the campaign you can play the battle in real-time through the other half of gameplay. You control your army and aim to defeat or rout all enemy units off the battlefield. The controls allow you to move and turn each unit as well as attack via different methods. For example when controlling an archer unit you can widen their lines, allowing arrows to cover more ground, and set them to "fire at will" so archers will automatically fire when enemy units are in range. Utilizing your units best is paramount to winning your battles as well as taking into account unit strength, morale, strengths and weaknesses. As you can see, the core strategy elements of the Total War series are still here and as strong as ever, but there isn't anything really original in this instalment, with most "new" features being from the first 'Medieval'. The New World portion of the game comes very late into the period and isn't that well-developed (although I believe the 'Kingdoms' expansion pack covers this). In addition, the AI still hasn't really improved since the last game. I mentioned in my 'Rome' review that enemy factions would attack you if you bordered one of their provinces even if they had no chance of winning a war. This is still the case in 'Medieval 2' and although it seems to occur at a lesser extent this is only because of the religion aspect of gameplay. Yet I've still played as the English and had the Holy Roman Empire attack me even when the Pope constantly threatens us with excommunication every other turn (although that is a strategy that I use to get around the Catholic rules!). Other modes in this game include playing through real life historical battles,such as the Battle of Agincourt, and creating your own custom battles. Custom Battles are fun because it makes good practice for the other modes and I like to make "what if" scenarios (e.g. can archers take on a whole side of melee units). I can say that the graphics are a big improvement in both cinematic cutscenes and in-game battles. The real-time battles are very crisp even on my fairly mid-spec laptop. There is also a lot of attention to detail as each man has a different face from the guy standing next to them so you don't feel you have an army of clones- individual soldiers even demonstrate unique behaviour such as nervously shuffling when the army is still. When siege weapon projectiles hit the ground they stay in the ground (as do arrows) and bring up dust upon contact. To appreciate the brilliant graphics at their best however make sure you have a powerful computer! Overall 'Medieval 2' is another great strategy PC offering. Admittedly it is more of the same with the similar design to the previous game's engine plus a few gameplay tweaks, along with AI behaving rather idiotically again. However there is graphical improvement especially in the real-time portions of the game and is a solid strategy game on all accounts. You easily find the original game for about £4.99 from online stores which I think is an excellent bargain now! (Also on Ciao under the username Anti_W)

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        28.06.2009 15:30
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        more than makes up for its flaws

        Medieval 2 total war is one of the most realistic medieval strategy games you can get for the PC in my oppinion, it improves heavily on the earlier total war games concerning animation and graphics, though the AI is still a bit on the daft side there are plenty of mods to give you an extra bit of challange or improve the historical accuracy of the game. Especialy if you like to mannage an ever growing medieval empire this game is the game for you. while the fighting animations are better there are also special fighting animations mixed in, a main problem whit this is that when a spearman stabs his spear into the ground while the man he knocked down is one meter further away it looks just awful. while there is a bit of a learning curve there are also advisors who are so annoying I shut them of so it took me a while to figgure out to lower taxes to stop towns from rebbeling. This game more than makes up for all its flaws when you succesfully storm a castle or hold of an army from a hiltop whit only a couple of bowmen.

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        24.06.2009 16:02
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        A fantastic RTS

        Although titled "Medieval 2", this is the fourth entry into the highly popular Total War series, improving the already superb mechanics present in the last title - Rome: Total War - in virtually every aspect, effectively presenting a level of strategic depth unlike any RTS we've seen before. The only real criticism to levy is that the astounding visuals and popping gameplay is given precedent over small nuances like realistic, smart AI. Still, it is a title that will appease both those unitiated to the RTS genre, and hardcore fans, I feel. Medieval 2's gameplay is, at a base level, very similar to the previous games - you attempt to control a certain part of the world (in this case, Europe). You must micromanage units, build new settlements, ensure technological advancement, and slaughter your enemies. The only real complaint of the gameplay is the complaint that has always been there - the lines of aggression are too clearly drawn - there is no real room for diplomacy or pragmatism. The second war is declared, you must strike until only one side is left standing, which seems a touch unrealistic and deterministic. That said, the actual combat itself is outstanding, with plenty of different camera options to cover the action, and there is even the option to recreate some famous battles, notably the Battle of Agincourt, who anyone who has read Henry V will remember fondly, no doubt. The game's level of challenge is balanced extremely well - there is very easy, for those who have played few RTS games before, to the insanely difficult, whereby even the most reasoned TW veteran is going to struggle somewhat. The AI does stifle procedings a little bit - the problems that persisted with the previous games, such as some purely nonsensical attempts at diplomacy, still remain. However, the sheer versatility of the actual options available to you mitigates this clunkiness to a considerable degree. Although it requires a fairly competent gaming rig to run well, the game does look superb. Gone are the cut-and-paste units of the previous games - soldiers appear to have their own distinctive look and feel. There are few gaming experiences like engaging in a battle of 4000-strong soldiers, then operating the "Total War camera" to zoom close to the action, and then simply observing the carnage. Even modest rigs may well need to lower their settings, though, because I found on my rig (which is more than decent), the frame-rate dropped occasionally in the middle of the carnage when using higher settings. As has always been a delight of the series, the audio portion returns with a soundtrack that rivals the epic feel of a Hollywood war epic. The voice work is also surprisingly decent, although some of the accents are pretty appalling, and naturally, as with the previous titles, there does tend to be a lot of repetition after a while. Some of the narration prior to a battle, outlining the conditions of victory, are both helpful and well-read, also. Whether you're a history buff or not, there's something here for everyone. Medieval 2: Total Realism is already on the way - a more historically accurate incarnation of the game, and as with the Total War counterpart, should turn out to be insanely popular with the militant fanbase. Conclusively, though, Medieval 2 is a stunning RTS that combines depth with a wealth of visual flair, making this the best RTS to come out in a long time.

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        18.03.2009 16:46
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        If you like strategy games this should be in your collection

        Medieval Total War 2 was released in November 2006 so my review is for an older product but as I have just discovered this product and loved it, there is no reason why you shouldn't either. MTW2 is an indirect sequel to Medieval: Total War which was released to much critical acclaim in 2002. It is the fourth game in the Total War franchise from Creative Assemble and is preceded by Rome Total War. The recently announced Empire Total War is the next game in this franchise. MTW2 builds on the RTW code base focussing on medieval warfare, politics and religion in Europe, Middle East and Africa. The main objectives of MTW2 are to become the supreme conqueror of the known world. Like all Total War games this is essentially two games rolled into one. You have the campaign map which is a turn based strategic game where you direct your armies around Europe like you would a game of risk. You can select your Towns or Castles (more on that later) to build new developments in economic, financial and military infrastructure, to recruit your weapons of war or to recruit agents of your realm. Then game two is the real time battle engine where you pit your wits against the computer AI or your friends, either within the campaign mode, or in individual custom battles. If you're playing the campaign mode your main goal will depend on the faction you have chosen and also the mode you have selected. Short games are designed for quick games that can be done in a night at a push or over the course of a week. In the short game the player is required to defeat one or two rival factions and to control at least 15 settlements. A long game could take you months to complete and requires you to control at least 45 territories and a number of significant territories. Your overall objectives depend on the civilisation you have chosen to start with. When you first play the game you only have five civilisations with which to play with: The Kingdom of England - This faction starts off with Caen, London and Nottingham as it's towns/castles. The main objectives of the English are to destroy the Scottish and the French, and also to conquer Jerusalem. The Kingdom of France - This faction starts off with Paris, Angers, Marseille, Rheims and Toulouse and their main objectives are the destruction of England and the capture of Jerusalem Holy Roman Empire - This faction starts off with Frankfurt, Bologna, Insbruck, Nuremburg, Staufen and Vienna and their main objectives are the destruction of Milan and Denmark as well as the capture of Rome. The Republic of Venice - This faction starts off with Venice, Iraklion and Ragusa and their main objectives are the destruction of Milan and the capture of Constantinople. The Kingdom of Spain -This Faction must conquer Granada and Jerusalem and destroy the Portugeese and Moors. Your starting town are Leon and Toldo Once you have completeted the game you unlock the rest of the civilisations (Byzantines, Danes, Egypt, Hungary, Milan, Moors, Poland , Portugal, Russia, Scotland Sicily, Turks, Papal States) I've mentioned Castles and Towns; this is a new twist that the makers of the game have thrown in to to make MTW2 different from its prequel. Each settlement can be built as a Castle or a Town, each have their different social and economic factors. A Castle can generate a wider variety of soldiers and will withhold a siege for longer. Towns generate more cash. You need to strike the balance between economy and defence and micromanage the two. Economics plays a huge role in the total war games and it has been improved in this game with the addition of Merchants and resources. You train merchants and place them on resources such as gold, wool, wood etc and the merchants will generate a number of gold each turn. The amount will depend on the distance from your lands and whether any other merchants have claim to the region. Your merchants can attempt to buy out other merchants from other factions in an attempt to increase their profitability, however be warned your merchants can fall fowl also. One of the major focuses of this game compared to other games is religion. If you are Catholic your Cardinals can be voted in as the Pope, this gives you untold political power amongst other Catholics. You can create priests to convert the lands of non Catholics in an attempt to gain popularity in these lands when it comes to your army conquering them. Also Priests will maintain the faith in your lands reducing the risk of Heretics and witches. Good priests get promoted to bishops and then cardinals. If you are best buds with the faction who has the pope then you can get away with a lot of things in the game like attacking other catholics. However should your enemy become the pope expect to be excommunicated and have Crusades called against you. The in game battles be-it through the campaign map or through a custom battle are stunning (on a powerful system) and really are what set this series of games a part from their rivals. Combat animations have been greatly improved so in the melee of action you can zoom into to watch the individual battles taking place between soldiers. You can watch the clash of swords, watch the men fall, watch the victor celebrate, only to be pierced by an incoming arrow... you get the idea. Like I mentioned to really get the best from this game you need a beefy system, certainly much more powerful than the recommended specs. On a very powerful machine you will see everything in all it's detail. I've touched heavily on the single player campaign mode but there are other modes available to the player. There are historical battles that your can recreate, featuring for example Agincourt. You can also set up your own skirmishes to have the battles you didn't get in the main game. There is also multiplayer though this is restricted to just battles not the campaign mode. Overall this is such an excellent game. When it was released it was ground breaking. Now two and a half years on it is still just as good and stands the test of time. There are so many iterations of the game to play and every time is different. The different AI's keep it fresh and interesting though I do think Easy is maybe a bit too easy. Even if it's your first stab at a total war game I would start on Medium. So if you are looking for a strategy game, turn based or real time this is the one for you! It combines so many different elements into one, against an historical backdrop with epic sound and visuals. You can get the game now for £7.99 or with its Expansion pack for £15.00... A bargain for such a good game. Developer : The Creative assembly Publisher : Sega Genre : Turn and Real Time strategy Ratings : 16+ Requirements Windows 2000/XP/Vista 1.8 GHz Processor 512 MB RAM 11GB uncompressed free Hard disk space 128 MB DirectX 9.0c compatible Graphics card DirectX 9.0c compatible 16-bit Sound card 8x Speed DVD-ROM drive

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          22.02.2009 14:04
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          A great rts

          Medieval 2 Totalwar is a real time strategy created by sega. The game takes place in, as you would guess the medival time period, and gives you a choice of many different factions to play as. When i first brought medieval 2 total war, the first thing that amazed me was the single player campaign. In the campaign, you choose from one of 21 factions. You only start with 5 factions to choose from, but as you defeat a faction in the campaign, you unlock it. The campaign takes place in europe, and you start in the country of your faction e.g england. The campaign also has different objectives for each faction, for example the english main enemy is france and they must be defeated to finish one of the main objectives. The campaign is turn based and new units are invented as time goes by. Another great thing about the campaign is the fact that, you dont just have to use violence to win, you can use diplomacy to create alinces, religion to start a holy crusade, or you can send an assassin to kill the enemy king or take out the current pope. In medieval 2 total war there is also a multiplayer, skimish and histroical battle mode. Multiplayer and skirmish allow you to choose any faction and buy an army with a set amount of money to fight an emey with. The historical battle mod allows you to take place in battle from the past e.g the battle of agincourt. The gameplay elements that really draw me in with M2TW is the fact that, you can just rush all your units in a big huddle at the enemy army, like in games like dawn of war. The game requires tactics, such as useing oyur cavalry to charge round the back of the units, causeing them to break morale, and also avoiding spearmen so that your cavalry doesent get destroyed within a milisecond. One of the downsides to M2TW, is the AI. Even when you play against it on expert it can act stupid and just run all of its units at you without hesitateing, this makeing it an easy game for you. I would give this game an 8/10, and it is a great game for any people who like rts's, and want a change from rts's that mostly revolve around guns and forceing your army at the enemy. System Requirements Minimum System Requirements: Microsoft® Windows® 2000/XP Celeron 1.5GHz Pentium 4® (1500MHz) or equivalent AMD® processor 512MB RAM 11GB of uncompressed free hard disk space 100% DirectX® 9.0c compatible 16-bit sound cardand latest drivers 100% Windows® 2000/XP compatible mouse,keyboard and latest drivers DirectX® 9.0c 128MB Hardware Accelerated video card with Shader 1 support and the latest drivers. Must be 100% DirectX® 9.0c compatible 1024 x 768 minimum display resolution Internet (TCP / IP) play supported; Internet play requires broadband connection and latest drivers; LAN play requires Network card.

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            06.01.2009 14:44
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            Buy - or wait for Empire : total war

            Medieval 2: total war is undoubtably the best strategy game out on the PC at the minute. The turn based game is very in depth, ranging from military to diplomacy. Medieval 2 is the first turn based strategy game that I have ever played whereby you can actually conquor half of the map without the use of an army, which certainly makes the game interesting! The games graphics are second to none, with the real time land battles looking very impressive (if you have a PC powerful enough to handle all of the required processing power), but the game still lacks real time navel scenes. The land battles are relatively strategic, i.e horses beat infantry, archers beat infantry and spearmen beat horses. On the face of it, it looks very complex, but ultimately it just boils down to a slightly more complex version of paper scissors stones. However, this aside, the overall campaign is a fantastic, addictive game.

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            13.09.2008 00:45
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            Great RTS game, allowing you great control over your forces

            Medieval II: Total War is an epic game spanning the years 1080AD - 1530AD and based within Europe, The Middle East and South America and challenges you to seize control of the medieval world. You'll probably need a relatively decent computer if you want to get the best out of the battle scenes. The graphics engine has been re-designed giving all the many thousands of people on the battlefield fantastic attention to detail, it really does look superb. It's not all just about fighting though, you must also build and manage your kingdom, balancing the needs of your economy, military and population. This wide variety of things you must do, along with the many new options in this installment, really immerses you in the game. The cut scenes are fantastic, no expense has been spared at all, the voice acting is good and again there is great attention to detail. All this makes the gameplay very addictive, although, because of the amount of time you have to invest in maintaining a kingdom, it is not one for the casual gamer. Overall this is definitely for someone who really wants to get sucked into a different world, there's so much to do in this game it'll be a long time until you get bored. Recommended.

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              28.06.2008 00:47
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              A brilliantly complex game, perfetly executed with awesome large-scale battles

              As a few other reviews here have mentioned, this is the fourth game in Creative Assembly's Total War series. The game spans from 1080 to 1530, and nicely covers several important events. These include, but are not limited to, the discovery of America and the beginning of the widespread use of gunpowder. I can't say for certain if these events actually DID occur between 1080 and 1530, but hey, it's just a game. To start off, you can play Single or Multiplayer. Single player can be either a Skirmish (Both players "buy" an army and fight it out on a large battlefield), Campaign (Which I will go into more detail on below), Historical Battle (A Skirmish with set armies and victory conditions designed to replicate a certain - you guessed it - historical battle), and Multiplayer (Same as Skirmish, but with human players). In the campaign mode, you begin by taking control of a faction. The choices at the start are England, France, Spain, Holy Roman Empire, and Venice, with more becoming selectable upon destroying them in a game. Each faction has it's own strengths and weaknesses, usually due to a particular unit. For example, the strength of the English comes from their Longbows. The game is essentially split into two modes: The battles, and the campaign map. Gameplay on the campaign map is turn based, with the whole of Europe, as well as parts of Afirca, and later America, split into a large number of territories. I don't know the exact amount, but i'd guess at easily over 250. They are divided between the 21 factions in the game, including rebels. The aim of the campaign differs from game to game, as the victory condition is set at the start. Generally they involve at least partial domination of the world, and who doesn't love that? The game is played in turns, each lasting 2 years, in game time. The player watches over his or her kingdom, building structures and training armies in their provinces. These armies then charge off across Europe, slaying your enemies and such. More on that later though. Taxes can be set, though if they're too high, there's a good chance of an uprising. Religion and politics also play very important parts in the game, particularly diplomatic relations with other factions. So many times i've had an alliance broken, only for the AI to turn around and attack me while i'm off-guard. Sneaky. The campaign map also allows the hiring and usage of agents. These can be something innocent, such an as emissary or a priest, or the much more sinister Assassin. Each time an assassin attempts to kill a target, you get a nice little movie to show his success, or failure. A nice little feature. The other half of the game is the battle mode. When two armies meet, or one army attacks a town, city, or castle that is occupied by an enemy army, a battle commences. Both sides are given one last chance to retreat, then then it begins. The battles themselves look incredible - the game uses a system to create large numbers of unique looking troops extremely quickly. Watching a unit even stand on the field doing nothing is oddly satisfying. In battles, the game becomes an extremely well made RTS. All units have their strengths and weaknesses, stopping any one particular unit from being a gamebreaker. Tactics are extremely important in the battles, as even the strongest units can be broken by the right attack at the right time. The game really shines in the siege battles, however. Watching the archers fire flaming arrows over the walls, and catapults slam boulders into castle walls is something that's just excellent. It far outshines the previous Total War games. I'm going to take a moment to mention the combat in battles. Soldiers move in a stunningly realistic fashion, fighting eachother until one is dead, then moving on to another target. The fact that at one moment you can be zoomed out far enough to survey the entire battlefield, and a moment later you can be watching a pair of random swordsmen fight it out is, well.. There's no other word for it. It's just cool. For me, this has been a pretty long review, but I haven't even touched on so many areas of the game. It's massive, and extremely detailed, and I heartily recommend it to anyone who was a fan of the old games, has an interest in Medieval warfare, or just wants an excellent game to play. It needs a fairly high-end computer to play it maxed out, but knocking all the graphics settings down a bit should have it running well on most mid-level systems. I'd go into more detail, but I could sit here all night listing features and not get everything. It's damn brilliant.

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              17.04.2008 20:12
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              Love it, buy it, cherish it

              The question you must ask yourself is not whether you should buy it, but if you are ready to withstand the amazing battles on an unprecedented scale and the absolutely mind boggling diplomacy with which you will have to take part. I must sincerely recommend this game for people that love history and strategy as much as I do. You will be immersed in a world of blood, war and conquest be it in the name of your country or in that of your god. The game itself has many entertaining characteristics such as religion, which will have you pulling your hair out or loving it for making it so much easier to expand. It is a game which will not leave you bored or tired of the repetition of other turn based games. The actual maps are startling and brilliant, full vivid colours and action packed battle scenes, where man on man fight for their own bitter survival. So if you like to have fun this is the game for you!!!

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                11.10.2007 11:59
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                Amazing game, and it works on my laptop!

                \'From the creators of the multi-award-winning Rome: Total War comes a PC title to take strategy gaming to unprecedented heights of scale and graphical detail..\' Now theres a promise! the question is, does it deliver? my answer has to be yes, and here is why.. I bought a laptop, a packard bell easynote with windows vista and the core duo intel processor, a gig of ram and a 256mb ati radeon graphics card. I inserted the 1st cd, clicked install and away it went. This process took AGES going through each cd, then back to the 1st. I doubted it would play on my lapton, but i went for it anyway... I was glad to see the pre-game video worked absolutely perfectly and loaded extremely fast! I did the tutorial mission, which to be honest was a bit stuttery and i suspect it was the same map as in Rome: Total war - but who is realy keeping check ay? Have you ever played Rome Total War? if you have and loved it - this is definitely without a shadow of a doubt, the game for you. You can do a historical battle, on the feild command and conquer style with historically accurate settings - without the ability to produce units - so its all out war! You can do a skirmish - the same as historical but with free reign of units set before you start the battle - and campaign mode - where you see the world map here units are abbreviated to armies, created by you at the towns you own. you can move \'armies\' wherever you want and attack who you want in order to gain experience and new towns. each town is capable of creating buildings and units, of your choice! Create your army and invade!! or just make alliances and trade partners. The games all about money, so make sure you dont overspend as your army costs to upkeep. This game has been a bane on my time and effort - so if you want to play, be warned ! ITS ADDICTIVE!

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                  22.08.2007 18:04
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                  Rome Total war is a better bet.

                  Medieval II Total was is the second incarnation of the Total war series based in medieval times, also included in the series of Total war are shogun, and Rome. So this newest Release is it an improvement on Rome total war or the original Medieval, or just more of the same? The Game: For those who know of Total war its much the same as the previous titles in the way that it plays in both the Campaign map and also into the battles, Management of the Cities is also much the same but a Family member is required to financially control the City/Fort. Units are Recognizable from the old games with a few changes here and there. For those Not familiar You take control of one of the Empires in the Middle ages (i go for England obviously) and then build you empire by conquering neighboring cities and the land they control from rebels or other Empires the main view being on the campaign map much like a Civilization type look. Obviously to achieve this a battle will need to take place, this is where you transfer to the battle view to conduct the battle in depth be it in an open field, forest mountain or siege to capture the city/fort. Graphics: The Graphics in this game have improved hugely from previous titles in the series, but then so have the demands on the PC system to run the game at a decent rate on the highest settings, if you have the system it is quite impressive. Game play: As stated before much the same as the previous titles in look and game play but with the better graphical looks, there are a few niggles that i found to be a wee bit annoying: 1. the cavalry are useless never form up right for the charge and are often easily destroyed without hours of practice. 2.The date progresses in turns and not by Date like previous titles witch may be small a thing but no less annoying. 3. the pope and his inquisitors are annoying and incredibly hard killing your family of with ease, respectively. 4. It can take forever to achieve anything so get set for long hours of game play. 5. archers/crossbow men are lethal and can decimate armies with ease if used correctly which is a bit far fetched. Apart from this which I'm sure will be fixed in Patches in due course its still a great game more so i would say for the New to Total war than the people who are experts. To sum up its a very decent game if you have never played Total war but a bit of a Disappointment if you are a fan of the series. I would suggest Rome Total war as it has a more rounded feel and flows smoother in the way that it plays. It has a few problems in the game play but if they were fixed in a patch it would make the game far more enjoyable to play for the long periods that it demands.

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                    14.08.2007 21:10
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                    A good game if you are new to ther series

                    As the latest game in the Total War Series, Medieval II: Total War has a tough act to follow. This time the game is set in Medieval Europe, just after the Norman Invasion of England, and at the time of the crusades. The Total War franchise is a known quantity, and you generally understand what you are going to receive. The pedigree of the series is very good, with a good blend of strategic management and tactical conflict. First, the good points. If you have sufficiently powerful pc, the graphics are awesome. The detail and the effects are excellent, when the settings are ramped up to full. However, various bits and pieces can be turned off, so that even a slower pc can deliver a decent frame rate, whilst still providing a good level of detail. The different voices and samples for each unit type are also good, although the accents can be a little dubious at times. The music, whilst not amazing, does enough to set the scene for the game. Settlements are now divided into Castles and Towns, with each providing different benefits. A castle is a military powerhouse, and can produce a vast range of units, where as a town provides much more income, and can house specialist guilds, to produce more advanced units, along with other benefits. The variety of unit types available to each faction creates a sufficiently different tactical mix that they all feel slightly different, and you have to change your playing style accordingly. There are also, once again, a huge number of factions available to play, with different goals and objectives, so there is plenty of replay value. The new innovations in the game generally work quite well. The Crusades (or Jihads for some factions) are a good idea, adding a little extra depth to the game. Basically, a Crusade is called, and you have to assemble an army for it, otherwise you will loose face with the Pope, which can drastically affect your relations with the other Catholic factions, which brings me nicely onto Religion. The addition of religion into the game adds an extra layer of depth to the strategic side of the game. The more of the population in a region have the same religion as the faction that owns it, the happier they will be, and vice versa. This opens up all new avenues of attack, as you can send priests to regions who have different religion and cause a revolt. They you need only tackle a rebel stronghold, rather than another faction. Now to some of the negatives. This edition in the franchise is more evolution, rather than revolution. The new ideas in the game are good, but it sometime feels like Rome:TW with knights, rather than a whole new game. After the high expectations raised by Rome:TW, this games does not deliver enough of an improvement. In addition, the battles some how seem to be easier this time around. As an example, on my first attempt at a crusade, I managed to take Jerusalem first time, and never lost it again. This is most evident with Sieges, as it seems too easy to capture even the most fortified of strongholds. At times, the religion system can be a little random, as one vote for the wrong candidate in a papal election can ruin your standing. In one game I played, I was excommunicated a few turns after capturing Jerusalem, simply because the candidate who won was from a faction who did not like me. All in all, if you have played Rome:TW to death and want a new challenge, it is worth taking a look. However, if you are new to the series, or would like a more difficult challenge, Rome:TW is the game I would recommend.

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