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MotoCross Madness 2 (PC)

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7 Reviews

Bang bars and bury your opponents in the tricked up sequel to Motocross Madness. More of the wicked dirt bike action of the original plus smokin new graphics, intense new events, authentic licensed bikes and all new stunts. Get on the pipe and go even madder.

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    7 Reviews
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      03.12.2009 00:26
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      "Motocross Madness 2" is a video game by Microsoft. It was first released in 2000 as a PC CD-ROM game and is a sequel to the original "Motocross Madness". In the United States, the game received a rating of "E" by the ESRB panel which deemed it suitable for all ages. The system requirements to run it are minimal by today's computing standards but include:

      System: PII 233 or equivalent
      RAM: 64 MB
      Video Memory: 8 MB
      Hard Drive Space: 200 MB

      With such a favourable reception on the first title, I figured it would be a challenge to topple what was already at a high standard of excellence. Two years after the first Motocross Madness hit the shelves this sequel was released and it did not fail to impress me. The game keeps to the original concept of racing and stunt performance but adds to these features with two new gameplay modes, enhanced graphics and a set of new features.

      The two main modes of play are racing and stunt quarry. In these modes, players are required to complete set objectives based on the mode itself. Racing allows the player to participate in the three original National championship mode, Supercross championship mode, and Baja racing mode but also in a new career and "Enduro" mode. While these new gameplay modes are welcomed additions they are not necessarily all that different from what was already seen in the original game. Enduro and Baja are very similar in their playing styles. Both feature circuit based racing across vast outdoorsy tracks and require the player to cross through a series of checkpoints. The path the player takes in between these checkpoints, however, is entirely up to the player. There are set tracks within the course but players can carelessly meander off into dense woodland or shrubbery, and possibly find shortcuts in the process. The career mode is similar to the championship series but proves different in that successful completion of races unlocks new and more powerful bikes. Motocross Madness 2 offers a total of 12 different dirt bikes which are based on true to life models currently in production. This number may prove small to some but I find it's offset by the customizable character who rides the bike. The uniform which he wears can be adjusted in terms of colour and design, and these images can be shared between others during multiplayer connectivity as well. There were no obvious alterations to the stunt quarry mode besides track locations, and the setting remains as fun as ever with the player being required to enter precise key combinations to cause the rider to perform tricks in aims of scoring points.

      While the graphics of the first title were by no means poor, Motocross Madness 2 creates a stunning visual experience. It appears as if the scaling of the tracks has been reduced to give a much more central focus on the rider and his surroundings require very fine software rendering abilities to look as slick as they do. Everything comes through very clearly and the seemingly fluid images flow at a very smooth pace. The soundtrack remains on par with what was experienced in the first title. The roar of the engine is apparent but does not overwhelm the listener as he or she attempts to guide the rider to success.

      Overall, Motocross Madness 2 is far superior to the original and is something I'd recommend without hesitation. It's unfortunate that multiplayer connectivity is not widely available anymore as this provided me with several hours of entertainment. I have seen the game supported by Gamespy Arcade for multiplayer action but have not tested it for myself. Nonetheless, as a single player venture this game still proves to be both fun and enjoyable.

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      27.08.2004 02:49
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      At last motocross madness 2! The sequel to the first brilliant game. It combines various different aspects of motocross: freestyle, enduros, baja and various others. The graphics are average but the bikes are perfect down to the last detail. The Pro Circuit event is brilliant. It combies all the other events as you ride all the tracks and doall the different types of races. You start off with no money, rubbish equipment, anda rubbish bike. As you win races you get paid for it and you can buy better gear and a better bike. it's made more realistic by the fact that you have to pay medical fees if you fall off or crash and have to pay to gain entry into the races. The game on a whole is very entertaining and realistic. it uses real brand names such as Honda and KTM and is very addictive if you start Pro Circuit. If you complete Pro Circuit you will get access to the best bike in the game. But after you complete it as with all games it gets a bit boring. There is a wide range of bikes to choose from aswell as equipment and lots of fun tracks. There is also a very good video at the start which is part of the credits and also very entertaining. The overall verdict is that it's a very good and entertaining game but could do with a few more tracks eg a freestyle park instead of just the usual country surroundings with the occasional building thrown in for the stunts event. The bikes should vary more in their speed and specs and having their own advantages and disadvantages, e.g some bikes being lighter and quick turning (ideal for tight tracks) and others being very fast but heavy (ideal for the enduro events) overall a brilliant game.

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        08.12.2001 23:09

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        Motocross Madness is my favorite pc game ever and Motorcross Madness 2 is a very similar game to the original, which is great! It holds the basic feel and concept of dirt bike racing. You control a motocross bike in third person view, racing against opponents or on your own across a number of landscapes, performing stunts to earn money. While the basics have been held on to for the sequel, much of the game has been revamped. The graphics are now much better, with more detailed textures and a nice collection of trees, buildings, vehicles and other objects for you to weave in and out of as you traverse wide-open plains at great speed. The environments are reasonably varied, ranging from desert to snow to jungle, but all appear fundamentally similar – small hills on a predominantly flat landscape with scattered obstacles (which, incidentally, are irritatingly good at stopping you in your tracks). But not all game modes involve racing over such landscapes. Outdoor and indoor track races are very numerous and enjoyable, if a little repetitive, and a stunts mode allows you to rack up as many points as possible through performing aerobatics whilst trying to maintain control over you flimsy bike. This leads to many spectacular crashes, as bike and rider are flung into the air to impossible heights, before landing with bone-breaking force (not that you die – just wait a moment or two and you’re as good as new). A championship mode covers all the various race types to create a progressive game, which adds a much-needed sense of purpose, although by the later stages things get rather monotonous. The control system is made for the Microsoft range of controllers, and a joystick, game pad or keyboard all perform equally well. Customizing the buttons is easy, and once in the game it’s all very simple to use – it’s just tricky to master the fine steering required for the indoor races or the stunts for the outdoor environments.
        Motocross Madness 2 is a very enjoyable game, and is easy to pick up. The graphics look decent, and are reasonably fast on most modern PCs. However, after a while it’s difficult to identify new and stimulating challenges – certainly for the more mature gamer (young children love it). The game becomes repetitive and boring after too much play, even before you complete the championship mode. But still, it is a good fun game, and is enough of an improvement over the comparatively bland original to be worth owning (or at least borrowing) both.

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        29.07.2001 05:03
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        Motocross Madness 2 is the sequel to the brilliant, you've guessed it, Motocross Madness. Published by Microsoft, this game provides some great action with great graphics, sounds and detail levels. For those of you who think you've seen that title somewhere before, well you'd be right in thinking that as it is similar to the title I used for my Midtown Madness review a week ago. Like I said back then, I got the two games as a double pack, and as I already had the original Motocross Madness, I played Midtown Madness before I got round to this fine game. And indeed, what a fine game it is. You get a choice of events, and locations (tracks) for that event. You can also enter into the Pro-Circuit, where you earn cash by entering races against other riders. So, lets do a little look at the game. To make it easier to read, I'm going to split the rest of the review down into sections. I don't normally do this, but last time I did the opinion earned a crown, so I thought I might try it again. --------------------------- INSTALATION --------------------------- The installation of the game is very simple, and basically gives you two install options. You don't get the chance to choose what components are installed, but rather get two choices. You can either go for the full installation, at over 400 megabytes, or the minimum installation, at around 150 megabytes. I went for the latter, and haven't really noticed any problems. The warning that comes with choosing this installation is that tracks will take longer to load, and while I have nothing to compare against, they actually don't take too long. The installation took no more than 5 minute (probably not even that long), and was very simple and straightforward. Microsoft appear to have gone to great lengths with this product to actually make the installation program look attractive, rather than the usual purely functional design. It does look at
        tractive, and modern, yet loses none of it functionality. You get very few options. Apart from the one I just mentioned, you get to choose what directory to install it in (though I always stick with the default path), and whether or not you want an icon placed on the desktop. I always have a shortcut icon, as for the first few days I use the game all the time, though after a few weeks, I always delete it as I never use the game so much after that. -------------------------------- OVERALL GAME & MENU SYSTEM -------------------------------- Once the game has started up, and presented the usual producers logo (in this case Microsoft and Rainbow Studios), you get a very nice Full Motion Video sequence of some Motocross action, with a small amount of game footage mixed in towards the end. But who ever watched that more than once? So what next. Well, next you get the game menu popping up. In my view, this is actually poorly designed. On each side of the screen is a bike chain, which has nine different icons located around the links. These represent the options you can choose, and are just about interpretable, though I would have preferred words. You do get little tips pop up as you hover over the icons, but after a while you just click based on the location rather than the image. The menu system is quite fast, and has very little delay between screens. Generally, you click on the single player option, which then brings up a pop up box asking you which game type you want to play: Baja, Stunts, Enduro, Nationals, Supercross, or Pro-Circuit. More on each one later, but this is really just a sub-menu that save time on the next menu, where you get to choose your game options. The game option menu includes the type of game (which is why the previous sub-menu is almost pointless), the circuit or area for that game, the bike you'll be riding on, your clothing colour, and bike number. Also more specific to the r
        ace you get to choose the number of opponents, and the number of laps if you have chosen a race. You can also choose a practice session, but you can still have opponents racing around, or you can do it on your own. Next I'll describe each game type, and then I'll look at the graphics and other related aspects that aren't directly associated with races themselves. ------------------- BAJA ------------------- Baja races involve you riding between Waypoints, or gates, over open countryside. The levels vary in surroundings, from desert, to snow covered tundra to forest and farm land. But the aim of the game remains constant. Ride from one gate to the next, and complete the required number of laps before any of the AI (Artificial Intelligence) riders. The game can be quite fun. Its not like racing flat out between points. In between are obstacles (mainly trees and the like), hills and canyons that all have to be negotiated. This can be quite tricky, and quite often the fastest route may not be the shortest. You get a very handy green arrow pointing you in the direction of the next waypoint, but it points directly at it, rather than the route you should take. This is where practice runs come in, to give you the chance to figure out the best route between gates. Also, the gates aren't necessarily in the same place for each race. There are a few set patterns, but you can also generate a random set of gates, thought the game will remember the locations so that you can practice and race the same course. The game can be quite hard to win, due to the high speed and accurate riding involved, and so far I am yet to win a race. ----------------- STUNTS ----------------- The stunts game is just you against the clock and your competitors, if you wish of course. You get to drive around one of several varying environments and just jump off ridges and pull tricks and stu
        nts, earning points as you go. In the original game, you did the stunts in one of several quarries, which made it quite easy to find place where you could pull off big enough jumps to get long enough in the air to pull of stunts. With this game, though, the worlds you race in are more sparse and varied, and so finding jump sites can be harder, and it does take a long time in free practice to find the right spots. Stunts can be quite hard to pull, and without a four-button joystick with throttle, they are almost impossible. You get a choice of 16 stunts, though there are apparently over 2000 possible stunt combinations. Once you've found the right places to jump off, the stunt events aren't to difficult, though mastering landing the bike after the jump is and takes hours of practice to allow you to make the majority of jumps, as you need to land safely in order to get the points for the stunt you pulled mid air. ----------------- ENDURO ----------------- Enduro races are very similar the Baja races. Again you race between waypoints through different environments, though this time in more densely populated areas. Rather than racing in relatively open countryside, you now have to fight for space with cars, buses, planes, bridges, storm sewers, caravans, road signs, fences, and buildings amongst others. The details on these levels are superb, and significantly add to the quality of the game, yet not sacrificing game speed. However, with all these obstacles, the game can become quite hard. Again, practice is essential, as with the static objects you can quite often come over a jump, and land by crashing into them, including after going through waypoints. Enduros are probably the best race event in this game, purely for the variety that you get, and can be, in my experience, one of the most rewarding. --------------------- NATIONALS --------------------- Nat
        ionals races take place on a specific track. There are about 15 tracks, or more, each with its own unique characteristics. You don't have to worry about hitting any obstacles, but there are still plenty of difficulties to be found. Firstly, what makes a Nationals tracks are its jumps. To master these jumps takes a lot of practice, as to get any sort of decent lap times you have to jump each one just right, so that you land on the down slope of the next jump to build up your speed again and make you landing a lot easier. Also there are plenty of twists, turns, drops and rises on these tracks making them difficult to master, and even more difficult to be good at. -------------------- SUPERCROSS -------------------- Supercross races take place on temporary tracks in big stadiums. Like the Nationals they take place on set tracks, and while they don't have the variety of terrain that is found on the Nationals, they are just as diverse. The tracks twist and wind through the stadiums, mostly using 90 or 180 degree turns. The straights, and sometimes corners, are strewn with jumps and lumps that again you have to master, but as the ground underneath is flat, unlike the Nationals, they are a lot easier to master. ------------------- PRO-CIRCUIT ------------------- The Pro-Circuit involves all of the above. Here, you enter races, and win money if you finish on the podium. You can also earn money by pulling off stunts, even on the races. You have to pay to enter the races, and have to fork out for medical bills and repairs to the bike, as well as upgrades, so winning is essential. I haven't played with the Pro-Circuit much yet as I'm simply not good enough yet, but when I do I'll expand this section a bit. ------------------------- GRAPHICS & GAMEPLAY ------------------------- The graphics in this game are only as good as the computer that is
        producing them. Just so you know, I've got a 450MHz P2, 128Mb RAM and 8MB 3D graphics card. However, even with this spec that is well above the recommended spec, I can't run the game with the graphics option turned up to their full without resulting in a very stuttery game. Instead, I've got the graphics option turned down, all to about 75% of the maximum, and get a very smooth game as a result. The only time there is ever any stutter in the game now is at the start of a race, but then it is only for the first few yards that you travel and after that it is smooth once again. The detail in this game is amazing, and its not just you and your bike that are animated. They have included moving cars, trucks and buses in the Enduro events, and even some planes that fly overhead. On the National races and Supercross races, you get a helicopter whirring overhead as you race around the tracks. Apart from the dynamic scenery, in this game when compared to its predecessor there is a lot more to look at. In Enduro races you find the most variation in scenery, with topical buildings and landmarks depending on which setting you are in. You get Ski lifts, chalets, and ski jumps, caravans and road signs, cactus, bridges, sewers, hay bails, everything you can imagine. This make for a much more interesting race than just riding round scenery with a few trees dotted around. As far as the gameplay goes, it is spoilt somewhat by how hard the game is. You can choose the difficulty level, yet even on the 'Easy' setting, it is almost impossible to win a race. Normally I can just pick up a racing game and be winning within half an hour, especially on the easier settings, but with this one several days on I'm still having little luck. The gameplay isn't really that varied. Yes you've got a variety of different tracks and race types, but they all do just about the same, and somewhere along the line have the same feat
        ures in relation to track design. Fortunately, due to the pure variety in track layouts, settings and scenery, the game doesn't get boring too quickly, but at the end of the day you are just going over jump after jump, and as it so frustratingly difficult, the game does loose its edge somewhat. ------------------- OTHER ISSUES ------------------- So what's left to consider. The sound in the game is quite good, though not very varied. You don't get any background music, and the only sounds you here are your engine noise, competitors engines, engines of moving vehicles, and the sound of you falling off and screaming. That’s it. So nothing special there. The game is easy to navigate, and is well set out. Its quite logical, though on a few occasions you are left wondering where you are supposed to click next. Control of the bike is quite hard unless you've got a good joystick. With the keyboard you stand no chance at all, as being a digital device it is just far too imprecise. An analogue joystick is the answer, though a single stick with two buttons isn't enough. Ideally you need four buttons, and throttle control. I wouldn't like to try a steering wheel with the game, as its just not a very natural control for a bike, whereas the leaning of the joystick does in someway tie in with the leaning on your bike. -------------------- CONCLUSION -------------------- So, overall the game isn't bad. It really could do with being made a bit easier, as this would make it a lot more playable. Other than that, the game will last a long time if you persevere, as it is just so hard to complete the Pro-Circuit, you'll be playing forever trying to win. The graphics are good, but a very powerful graphics card and processor are needed to push it along at full rate. Personally, I wouldn't recommend this game to anyone, based on the difficulty factor. I'm sure
        bike enthusiast would love it, though I expect real life Motocross rider would say that it was a bit unrealistic.

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          31.05.2001 05:21
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          After spending many hours watching my boyfriend on this game and figuring out that to sit in the spare bedroom with him was to be the only form of communication for the foreseeable future, I thought it only fair that I should have a go on this game and see what all the fuss is about. ~~PLEASE BEAR IN MIND THAT I AM A GIRLIE WHO KNOWS NOT A LOT ABOUT MOTOCROSS OR PC GAMES. THANK YOU~~ The Game ~~~~~~~~~~~~ The game is obviously based on the sport of motocross (?) Which includes 6 events and numerous tracks upon which you can race and compete. There are also 16 stunts for you to learn, which I couldn’t do but my boyfriend has mastered quite well. The events are: BAJA- tracks for beginners, which are outdoors. STUNT QUARRY – this event allows you to clock up extra points by using the stunts you have mastered. ENDURO – This is new to motocross madness and has tracks, which are based in Arizona and include difficult obstacles NATIONALS – Based on the real tournament and a real test of your acquired skills. SUPERCROSS – An indoor event based again on the real thing and for the more advanced among us. PRO- CIRCUIT – This is the daddy of the events in which you actually live out the career of a motocross rider, earning points and sponsorship money and also new bikes to choose from. The graphics on this game are so realistic and so are the sounds they remind me of many a Sunday afternoon stuck in a mud field watching endless loony’s flying round the track! Our computer is relatively small and not of a high spec at all but we have had no problems loading or running the game. The Internet ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Yes the internet, now this where paul and I fall out the most because there is a link on the game which if you are connected to the internet you can go to Microsoft’s gaming zone upon which you find a
          whole new wonderful world of motocross madness. In the zone you can download new tracks and bikes to race on, which you can save, (average download time 20 minutes) You can also race and host games with people from all around the world. It can get very competitive but it’s an excellent addition to the game. My boyfriend fall out about this cause he spends all his time online with this and never lets me do my ciaoing! The game costs on average £29.99 but is well worth it for what you get. HEALTH WARNING – MAY SERIOUSLY AFFECT YOUR RELATIONSHIP!!

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            23.04.2001 06:29

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            Yes,that's right. This is a absolutely amazing game. It is very very real. You have to see it to believe it. When you hit a tree, the guy falls very realistically, and the graphics, absolutely amazing. I left playing games a year ago, because they got boring. Recently I came across MotoCross Madness 2, and I couldn't belive my eyes. When I started playing, I was hooked, it was very realistic and it gave me a thrill. I have always wanted to jump around on a bike, this was my chance. I highly recommend it. I am very much impressed by the trial verion, I am going to buy it. I really like the easy and fantastic navigation designed for the games manager. You have to see it to believe it. I will write more, once I have the whole thing.

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            25.03.2001 05:29
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            Motocross Madness 2 is a very similar game to the original, holding the basic feel and concept of dirt bike racing. You control a motocross bike in third person view, racing against opponents or on your own across a number of landscapes, performing stunts to earn money. While the basics have been held on to for the sequel, much of the game has been revamped. The graphics are now much better, with more detailed textures and a nice collection of trees, buildings, vehicles and other objects for you to weave in and out of as you traverse wide open plains at great speed. The environments are reasonably varied, ranging from desert to snow to jungle, but all appear fundamentally similar – small hills on a predominantly flat landscape with scattered obstacles (which, incidentally, are irritatingly good at stopping you in your tracks). But not all game modes involve racing over such landscapes. Outdoor and indoor track races are very numerous and enjoyable, if a little repetitive, and a stunts mode allows you to rack up as many points as possible through performing aerobatics whilst trying to maintain control over you flimsy bike. This leads to many spectacular crashes, as bike and rider are flung into the air to impossible heights, before landing with bone-breaking force (not that you die – just wait a moment or two and you’re as good as new). A championship mode covers all the various race types to create a progressive game, which adds a much-needed sense of purpose, although by the later stages things get rather monotonous. The control system is made for the Microsoft range of controllers, and a joystick, gamepad or keyboard all perform equally well. Customising the buttons is easy, and once in the game it’s all very simple to use – it’s just tricky to master the fine steering required for the indoor races or the stunts for the outdoor environments. Motocross Madness 2 is a very enjoyable game, a
            nd is easy to pick up. The graphics look decent, and are reasonably fast on most modern PCs. However, after a while it’s difficult to identify new and stimulating challenges – certainly for the more mature gamer (young children love it). The game becomes repetitive and boring after too much play, even before you complete the championship mode. But still, it is a good fun game, and is enough of an improvement over the comparatively bland original to be worth owning (or at least borrowing) both.

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