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Portal 2 (PC)

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7 Reviews

Genre: Action & Shooter / DVD-ROM for Windows Vista / Windows XP / Mac OS X / To Be Announced / Release Date: 2011-04-21 / Published by Electronic Arts

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    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    7 Reviews
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      05.06.2013 21:43
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      fun game for people of all ages.

      Introduction
      ----------------
      This is an excellent game which i got through the Valve complete pack in the winter sale for £24.99, i played the original game and just through the excellent game play that i experienced in that made me want to get the next game. I like how they developed more of a storyline right from the beginning while in the first game i did not feel like the storyline properly got going until about a third of the way through the game.
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      Features
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      The puzzle solving aspects of the original portal came out strongly in Portal 2 and if anything this has improved especially with the different forms of gels which can have an affect on the game world. Without spoiling the storyline for any prospective players i like the way how Glados comes back with a vengence in this game. I also love the different personality cores which are present in this game especially Space who memes have evolved around.

      I also believe that the portal gun is vastly improved in this game by which i mean that the graphics that it produces are much more realistic. This could most likely be because of the fact that the source engine has evolved since the original game along with the orange box. Along the line of graphics i love the fact that with this game the details around the game world have also improved with the textures being at a much higher resolution. What i don't like about this game is the fact that the settings menu does not seem to remember that you have changed settings before.
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      Conclusion
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      I would recommend anyone who likes games which challenge you to play this game because of the way how it requires you to think about how to get across to the exit instead of most modern games which seem to be centered on running and gunning. This is what makes the portal world so interesting along with the fact that some elements of both Half-life and the portal world blead into each other with both Black mesa and Aperture Science being mentioned in both games.

      I have not played the co-op mode of this game much so this means that unfortunately i can't give you a reliable consumer opinion on this although from what i have played of it a new level of puzzle solving is added. This is because of the fact that you need to work as a team to solve the puzzle and not just a single person.
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      14.12.2011 10:32

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      Reaches the high bar set by the original, but doesn't beat it.

      For those of you wondering why the fantastic 'Half-Life' saga hasn't concluded then look no further than 'Portal'. The surprise hit diverted all attention into a sequel to the near-perfect 2007 hit.
      'Portal 2' follows on many years after the original where again the player has to escape the Aperture Science Enrichment Centre with the aid of an affable robot accomplice called Wheatly (voiced by Stephen Merchant) using the portal gun to create opening and exit portals in ever more complicated puzzle rooms. That's all the plot I'm going to give away but I will say that in every respect the scope of 'Portal 2' has been increased with the introduction of more characters, greater exploration and even more insights into the history and mythology of the 'Portal' universe (which is linked to the Half-Life universe). There are also additions to the puzzle mechanics with different gels to enable the player to jump higher run faster and create portals on previously impossible surfaces. Another innovation is with multiplayer, now two players can assume control of 'Test Robots'and play through a series of specialised cooperative multiplayer puzzles which extends the gameplay by a good number of hours.
      There are twists and turns along the way and as with the previous game it is highly advisable to wait until the final credits have rolled. I really can't think of a great problem with the game. It had huge ambition and a weight of expectation upon it and in my opinion it succeeded. It can never be the quaint and I'm assuming success of the first game and some people might find all the extra bells and whistles to be a bit egregious but it's now my go to game of choice for imaginative and humorous puzzles.

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      30.11.2011 20:02
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      Great game continuing the cult-status original

      If you missed the original Portal from just a few years back, then you would be in good stead to do some homework. Somehow portal made fusing puzzler, first-person platformer and storytelling seem like the golden blend, forming a huge fanbase as soon as word spread. I for one thoroughly enjoyed it and had never played anything quite like it before or since, and that in itself is remarkable in this day and age where there's not too many revolutionary advances happening in the games world.

      If you've been out of the loop for a while, the Portal series' hook is it's namesake. Solve physics-based puzzles in a clearly abandoned gigantic scientific facility by creating portals on solid surfaces in order to teleport yourself or objects to accomplish the task at hand. In text, this sounds kinda boring, and if you needed to know that in the first place then you sorely need to visit the first game to truely initiate yourself. Starting with Portal 2 would be as bad as starting a book at the halfway point.

      So for those who loved Portal and are merely flirting with the idea of paying for Portal 2, like I was, then you'll be glad to know that in summary it's worth it's fairly higher-than-expected price. Or rather, if you presumed Portal 2 to be as short as Portal and were bemused at the premium cost attached to the successor, then you will be surprised. I purchased Portal 2 in the autumn steam sale of this year for a pittance of £6, expecting a mere continuation of Portal and closure of the storyline. What I got, however, was a not a flighty diversion but a meaty and extended adventure with everything I loved about Portal and more. Clearly a lot more effort and care was transfused into the sequel to bring it easily in line with the standard of Valve's more mainstream titles such as Half Life. No matter which way you look at it, an already groundbreaking game has made further strides.

      Aperture Science Laboratories, the large human testing facility of the first game, is where we remain in Portal 2. The passage of time is evident and the damage sustained by the chaos previously seems to have taken it's toll. Level designers must have broken the bank with the extent of detail and scene-setting right from the start, and whereas you might already know Aperture as a vast facility, Portal 2 blows it wide open and allows you to experience a sense of scale from a different viewpoint. I've played a few games whereby some kind of gigantic structure seems to be centric to the game (Half life 2's citadel springs to mind), only none have felt quite so massive as Aperture Science. Your journey will even take you through the eerie condemned testing area of Aperture Science's original laboratory from the 50's/60's, hidden deep within a salt mine. This particular scene was my personal favourite place to be, as I absorbed the frighteningly teutonic environment. There's scene after scene whereby simply walking through them without taking the time to look around you and witness the meticulous designs can be a bit of a loss. In this respect, Portal 2 is happily replayable if you are interested in little treats and easter eggs. The developers crammed plenty into the first, and the sequel only capitalises on this.

      The game's shiny new graphics techniques are proudly displayed. A very lifelike and moody lighting technique is present and used to great effect whenever the player is not too pre-occupied to notice it. Take a jolly through pitch-black catwalks as wheatley lights the way with his torch, and you'll find the flickering shadows tantalisingly well-done. It's not always showcased so obviously, but certain scenes would not be possible without it.

      Scene setting is not merely done with visual designs, however. Audio is extremely important, and as an avid headphone user I was delighted to find just as much care was taken over the environmental ambience. I appreciate effort in audio, and when standing in the old condemned Aperture labs inside a ghostly mine cavern with the gigantic testing spheres looming overhead, while thunderous hollow steel was banging and creaking - it was magical and haunting. There are many scenes with a great sense of place but that is very much one of those really memorable scenes. The backing ambience itself is not a fixed entity and bends to suit the minor events taking place or the successes acheived while you're solving the puzzles. The heavily electronic and chaotic music used in the occasional times of panic or pressure may be a little bit distracting, but forgiveable.

      Almost all of the puzzle elements in Portal are present, and then some. A few have been updated or replaced - for example, instead of the gravity-defying wall-deflecting plasma balls we are given beam lasers, which not only look brilliant but their path can be altered using prism blocks to deflect the beams to wherever you desire. The crafty puzzle potential of lasers and portals is rather self-explanatory! The loveable robotic sentry turrets are back, and while you might have been faced with rooms full of them in the original game, in the sequel they are used much smarter and surgically. A lone turret may overlook an entire test room and force you to combine all the puzzle elements to remove the threat and allow you to pass. Yes, it goes beyond simply dropping weighted boxes on top of them this time. If you've seen the trailers for Portal 2, you'll have seen the bright orange and blue fluids introduced in this sequel. The blue repulsion gel is essentially a flubber-like material, allowing you to bounce off it at largely the same velocity at which you hit it, setting up some incredible puzzles focused on making that last leap of faith with the aid of this new blue material. The lifelike nature of this scientific gunge is only possible thanks to a never-before seen physical representation of liquids which is another great addition showcased in Portal 2. The orange fluid is a sort of acceleration gel, allowing you to make like Sonic and reach healthy speeds on foot. This can surmount to running headfirst into a portal at ground height in order to carry the momentum into the exit portal. It's merely another interesting way to build energy and launch you that extra bit. There's plenty of other puzzle elements too and they are all beautiful and smartly done, and throughout all of the challenges I really felt like no single device was forgotten about. Many of the chambers/puzzles have the distinct effect of being bewilderingly confusing at first glance, only to slowly click into place despite some of them employing a good number of the devices available. Such is the ease of use and application of Portal's new ideas that it's not totally obvious but never impossible, and a good reason for this is that there's no code-breaking or clue-hunting, only physical and visual challenges which everyone can enjoy. Portal's conundrums are always satisfying to solve and will spur you to carry on evermore.

      As a game with very few speaking roles, those that are there are not to be squandered. Portal's excellent character building and portrayal is lovingly continued hereon. The original game introduced us to the dark and stinging personality of Glados, and she is back in full splendor in Portal 2. Also brought to the stage is a co-protagonist of robotic build but far less omnipotent proportions, Wheatley. Voiced by Stephen Merchant, people familiar with the Ricky Gervais podcasts will love to hear the hilarious gangly bristolian in a role such as this, and those who are not acquainted will be delighted with the comic effect and candid delivery of all of his dialogue. Portal 2 surprised me with the amount of humour and laugh-out-loud moments, almost all of them pivoting around Wheatley. Wheatley provides the majority of comic relief this time, but Glados fans need not worry for she's still a primary and pivotal character, only you may find her in a different role than you'd ever imagined. Some classic gags are used to great effect and the strange sense of warmth in a previously cold and frigid facility is felt. There are also some brilliant funny set pieces which are only possible in the world of portal, and are therefore totally fresh. Whereas Glados couldn't really thrust much of a physical influence on the Aperture facility in the original portal, that idea has been perceived differently this time. Wheatley's messy introduction makes apparent the fact that the Aperture Science facility is actually completely at the whims of the robotic intelligences governing it, with gigantic sections of test chambers shifting into place before your eyes, and very crudely at points when a certain Wheatley is at the wheel. Portal's global environment is brought across brilliantly at every good opportunity, and where possible you are reminded of the fact that you are only a testing guinea pig under a very real threat. I found the mating of puzzle and storyline at the same time was seamlessly done and carefully planned for great pacing.

      Whilst portal's gameplay is predominantly about puzzles, there's no doubt in my mind that the main reason you will play to the end is the engrossing storyline. It's less of a storyline, and more of a chaotic soap opera whereby two robotic intellects lock horns via your existence, culminating in brilliant back-and-forth dialogue and power struggles. Friends and enemies don't become so clearly cut, and more of the origins of Aperture and it's artificial authority become clear in bitesize, teasing slices. The concept may be vaguely familiar, but the delivery is second to none. From start to bedazzling end Portal 2 is superb and is well deserving of praise. I purchased it at a cut price anticipating a clever puzzle game and some continuation of story. What I got was a blockbuster game which blew me away and left me grinning from ear to ear at every turn and was hard to predict. Whenever I thought I knew what was going to happen next, I was actually way off the scent and in turn loved the new direction the story was going. I've gone from indifferently purchasing, to must-not-miss, and so will you.

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      27.10.2011 17:59
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      Looking for something different in a first person shooter? Invest in this gem of a game, you monster

      Portal 2 is one of those rare times that a sequel is better than the original game - but that is not to take anything away from the original Portal which was by Valves own admission a test for what the Source engine was capable of and to test with a new type of first person shooter.

      Portal 2 builds upon an inspiring universe that the Half-Life series is set in and creates a deep, clever and meaningful storyline that many games today lack, especially first person shooters. I mention Half-Life as there is a clever link between Portal 1/2 and the Half-Life series, which if you have played will have picked up on while playing Half-Life 2 Episode 2 and when you play Portal 2. I say when, because you will play this game as there is no dissatisfaction on any level of the quality of this game.

      What they have done with this sequel is too create a deep story line based on a few concepts and ideas from the first. Of which I must insist, no demand that if you decide to buy this to play the original Portal FIRST. There are links which you will miss and you may not appreciate as much if you do not play the original then wish you played the original. Both can be picked up cheaply so please do not hesitate.

      I am being very careful not to give much away of the story along with the clever concept of using portals to solve puzzles as it is best kept fresh with no inkling of what is about to happen for the best experience. When you finish each level there is a feeling of accomplishing something, especially when inevitably you are stuck on a puzzle for a long time and finally realise that the answer is staring you in the face.

      The icing on the cake (no pun intended) is the sense of humor Portal 2 has that comes through GLaDOS (continued from Portal) and the introduction of the brilliant voice acting from Stephen Merchant. Granted your character is silent but that adds to the game in some weird way that I am not 100% how they managed to do that - like they do with Dr. Freeman.

      If you are on the fence, you are in safe hands in investing in this game. The only downside is the length of the game, this may be down to the fact I couldn't stop playing it so it didn't seem to last as long as others or that it is a bit shorter than some titles. But if it is shorter, it is of a high quality story telling game play experience that you will not regret.

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        15.08.2011 21:55
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        An Incredible game. Gonna be a game of the year contender that is for sure

        Valve, Bioware, Platinum Games, Rockstar North and Naughty Dog. To me these companies represent the elite group of game developers. Each of these companies just provide triple A games that provide amazing interactive experiences

        Story

        Sequel to the 2007 surprise hit. Portal 2 once again puts you in the shoes of Chell an Aperture Science test subject who awakes from a prolonged sleep to find the Aperture Science laboratories falling apart and with you and your comrade Wheatley trying to find safety and the portal gun. But after a hilarious scene you and Wheatley manage to reactivate GLADoS the dark humoured sadistic AI of the first game

        The story whilst not of the complexity of the Half Life series is still brilliant with well written and funny dialogue which is further enhanced by the acting talents of Ellen Mc lain as GLADoS, Stephen Merchant As Wheatley and JK Simmons who plays the eccentric billionaire owner of Aperture science Cave Johnson

        Graphics

        Valve as always do get the best out of the Source engine with the the first 10 minutes of gameplay really showing off the power of the engine as parts of Aperture Laboratories falls off and crashes in to each other.

        Valve as always has beautiful physics whether that be from the sense of speed you got going though a portal from a tall height or the way that the propulsion gel hits flies through the air and hits the floor.

        Gameplay

        Gameplay is near flawless as you go out of the test chambers and explore the wilderness of Aperture Laboratories. As you progress further though the game different items become available to you such as the various gels, light bridges, lazers and lazer refraction cube. The experience did start to lose its way when it came to chapter 8 but the dialogue of Wheatleys incompetence and insecurity really does help you through and the final chapter is an excellent climax

        The game is one of the best I have played this year. Once again Valve can do no wrong...... Now where is Half Life 3

        There is a Co-Op mode but I have yet to try it as no one I know shares a similar love for Portal 2 or any games outside of CoD and Fifa 11

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        06.06.2011 18:11
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        The game of the year 2011

        The short and charming 'extra' game known as Portal that was combined with Team Fortress 2 and Half Life 2 in Valve's 'The Orange Box' received unexpected recognition as one of the greatest games of all time. It was inevitable that what became an internet phenomenon would not take it's chance to have a follow up title to quench the thirst of fans eager for more. The excellence of Portal had placed a tremendous weight on Valve's shoulders to produce an even funnier, longer, more crazy mind-bending puzzle shooter game which would once again become a benchmark for defining perfection. That game is its sequel: Portal 2.

        Following on from the events of Portal 1, the player again assumes the role of Chell; the silent female test subject whom we still know nothing about. The player is returned to the Aperture Science laboratories that is still run by the psychotic watching eye of GlaDOS, the twisted robotic villain who is still bent on using Chell to do further testing of the portal device by trying to kill her; in increasingly dangerous puzzles. Aperture Science is somewhat in ruins after the first game and GlaDOS is in the process of 'cleaning up' the mess which in some ways develops a strange sympathy for your greatest enemy through the course of play. At the start of the game, the player is promptly greeted by a robotic personality core known as 'Wheatly'. Boasting a strong British accent he accounts for many amusing sequences with his idiotic nature pretending to be somewhat intelligent. The objective of the game is naturally to escape the chaos of the Aperture Science laboratories with your new buddy.

        The structure of the game is fairly similar to Portal 1. GlaDOS still wants to test and you are still the tester. The game is broken up into a series of Test Chambers, each with their own puzzles to solve before proceeding to the next chamber with an increased level of difficulty. The first few chambers are overgrown by plants and the chambers are corroded and broken as a result of the lab being unused for some time after Portal 1. Yet, upon your return the whole place feels alive, panels are restoring themselves to original positions, stairs replaced and the occasional pieces of rooms being unable to fix themselves and proceed to what looks like them hitting their heads off the walls in frustration. Some of the gameplay does take place outside of the test chambers, featuring the 'old' labs not created by GlaDOS. These provide a very interesting back-story to Aperture Science itself, its origins and just what the heck happened. The player treks through these test chambers accompanied by voice recordings of Cave Johnson exposing the player to lines of pure gold. Portal 2's dialogue has more worthy quotes than that of Shakespeare, to give a small taster of one of the lesser quotes:

        "They say great science is built on the shoulders of giants - not here. At Aperture we do all our science from scratch; no hand holding." - Cave Johnson

        Its probably time to tell you what Portal 2 actually is, huh? The fact I've taken so long to get there shows how much the story, characters and setting itself are just as important and interesting. For those unfamiliar with Portal, the name comes from the device you are involuntarily testing for your own survival. Chell is equipped with a gun which fires portals, the mechanic is fairly simple yet feels strangely original. Simply put, fire 2 portals at 2 different locations. Walk through 1 portal, come out the second, simple yeah? The concept is, the practical use of them however becomes a bit more tricky and head hurting when physics puts itself into the equation. There is no loss of energy between portals, thus the speed of entry is the same as the speed of departure which can result in high flying sequences of picking up momentum by falling from a height, into a portal to propel yourself to a higher platform. Puzzles are made more interesting with the introduction of tractor beams, light bridges and various gels such as bouncy repulsion gel, all which can be manipulated through portals to make for some elaborate puzzles with many solutions.

        The puzzles of Portal 2 are of appropriate difficulty level but I didn't feel that the single-player campaign was as difficult as I hoped it'd be. Of course, I have to step back and look at the audience. Portal 2 reaches out. It couldn't be too tough for the many whom may never have played Portal and won't have the experience 'thinking with portals'. That said, some puzzles did take me some thought, enough to give me satisfaction in developing a solution. I did get stuck the odd couple of times, but it wasn't too long until I had that 'Aha!' moment. I was disappointed with the lack of Advanced Chambers** like Portal 1 which strip away some parts of the tests to make things harder, I'd have enjoyed the tough challenge. The single-player was an experience to remember, its around 8 hours of incredible fun, but that is the issue, it'll just be remembered. Its difficult to go back and play Portal 2 again since you should remember the solutions to most of the tests taking away most of the fun until new content is released.

        As excited as I was for the single-player to Portal 2, it was the new co-op mode that I was most interested in. Its introduction allows a couple of players to play a side story of 2 testing robots either split-screen or online. Two players means 2 portal guns, which allows for harder chambers and more head hurting. The co-op is naturally more difficult that the single-player. I played online with a mate of mine and whilst the game handles the puzzle solving with the only communication being pointing markers for where the other player should place their portal, where to stand indicators and timers very well, its nothing compared to using headsets to solve the puzzles. My friend and I had great fun trying to solve the puzzles, some of the solutions staring us in the face and we still took a fair bit of time to solve them. Its every bit as addicting as the single-player game such that we blitzed through the game within about 4-5 sittings. Its interesting to see other people's thought processes, we often had different ideas on how to solve the tests, both perfectly okay but with a clear winner in the easy to implement department. If you don't know anyone with Portal 2, or have not a second controller for split-screen, fret not! You can play online with automatically matched co-op partners. I found the loading times a bit long between tests, but its a small price to pay for the amount of fun you get out of it. Since the PS3 edition also incorporates Steam, its allows PC gamers to play co-op with PS3 gamers. Great news! The fact that the PS3 copy grabs you a free copy of the PC version is even better, for the toolkit has been released and will allow gamers to download and play user-created levels. Thus, the PS3 gamers can also get in on the modding action to make for more user created levels on the PC.

        I really don't want to say much about the story, you'll just need to take my word for it that Portal 2 exceeds Portal, it is an absolute joy to play and like Portal just feels like nothing I've played before. The puzzles are fantastic, the characters, the dialogue, the level design, voices, everything. So incredibly addicting that you just keep wanting more of the game, Valve have delivered what was expected from me and I'm extremely happy to have played through Portal 2 and really hope for some great new downloadable content to be released to get my brain going again.

        **At the time of writing, there were no Advanced Chambers available. I am aware that in the future there is to be free DLC containing advanced chambers and some extra chambers. This review is only accurate from the time of writing: 24/05/2011

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          28.05.2011 12:51
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          Time to start thinking with some Portals

          Portal 2 is an action-puzzler by Valve. It is published in both retail and digitally through Valves own system, Steam. The game takes place in a first person perspective.


          Aperature Science Gameplay Facility


          Portal 2 takes place in a science facility, Aperature Science to be precise. You, as Chell, the protagonist of both this and the previous Portal games, you must solve puzzles using Portals. First with Wheatley, a fairly insane robot with a fantastic personality (voiced by Stephen Merchant, from 'The Office') and then later with GlaDOS, the computer that administered all of the testing of the previous game, now bitter that you had attempted to kill her.

          The puzzles are apparently easy, but I find them achingly hard. There have been levels earlier on in the game that I had to heck a walkthrough (it tells you how to get through a level to complete), so it is beyond me how a younger child could possibly play this and succeed. However, a lot of my friends completed the game in hours and laughed at my inability to complete the earlier levels. So I guess its just me then.

          A lot of the Portal gun gameplay is vastly varied, and there are a lot of factors that are progressively brought into play throughout the game. These factors range from jump-pads, that project you across the room all the way to turrets that questionably ask "Who's there?" before riddling you with bullets - then muttering "I don't blame you" as you knock them over, saving yourself.

          There is also a cooperative mode that pits you and a friend playing as cooperating robots as you go through the test chambers, using teamwork to get you through very well done chambers. This is one of my favourite things about the game, and that might just be because my friends can tell me what to do and I still get the satisfaction of feeling varyingly smart.

          The game may not be that long, or so some of my friends tell me, but if you just want to have a bit of fun with Portals, no matter how long it may take you to complete, this is the game for you.


          Aperature Science Graphics Processing Unit


          The graphics in Portal 2 are a fair bit better than the original Portal. Oh who am I kidding: they're absolutely fantastic. Much has been done to improve on the original Source engine released in 2004, and much has been done to improve on the revision prior to this. There are now full dynamic shadows (shadowing that is cast by moving objects onto other moving objects), specular lighting (shiny edges to give depth) and improved models (how the characters actually look, imagine a clay model with no paint) and textures (that's the paint on the clay models).

          What's better, unlike many new games, ported directly from the consoles. It's performance even on lower end computers cannot be comparable to a snail! Fantastic! In fact, even on the lower end of the computer scale, the game runs like an absolute dream, something that is an incredible feat when compared to the latest AAA (high budget) titles. This is one of the things that Valve continues to do well, and its making the game for PC first, and then putting it on the consoles. Moving on.


          The Cast of Aperature Science


          There aren't actually that many characters in Portal 2. Practically the entire cast consists of robots that have synthesized speech. The only exception is you. However, these aren't ordinary, boring, faceless robots. They're friendly and their voicing is excellent. Again, the obvious star of the show is Stephen Merchant, who does a great job at voicing his character, Weatley.

          GlaDOS, the main antagonist in the original Portal is voiced by Ellen McClain, and she does an absolutely fantastic job at voicing the computer, with the help of Valves sound team and audio effects.

          The main character, however, is a mute. There is no voice acting, and as such there is very little sense of personality in your own character. She doesn't retaliate to anything that GlaDOS says, and the only thing that the player actually knows about her is what GlaDOS tells her, and by extension the player. I guess this is a smart way of revealing the character as the game goes on.


          Aperature Money Sucking Vacuum


          Again, my friends continuously tell me that the game is excrutiatingly short, but you know what, I just don't care. The ability to play against my friends will heighten any replay value that the game may have, and then my other friends that play on PlayStation 3, with the release of the Steam digital distribution system via PSN.On PC, even the authoring tools have been released, and when Source games are involved, its generally safe to say that there's going to be some pretty high quality portal flinging mods coming your way, and that is value for money in itself.


          Aperature Information Stream


          The game was released on the 19th of April 2011.
          The game is available in audio for the following languages: English, French, German, Spanish and Russian.

          There are subtitles for the following languages: Czech, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Hungarian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Simplified Chinese, Swedish, Thai, and Traditional Chinese.

          The game has a singleplayer and a cooperative mode

          The game uses Steam Cloud savegame synching. Has commentary and captions, statistics, makes use of High Definition Range Technology, has controller support and has a Source SDK and level editor included.


          Content Advisory


          Portal 2 isn't particularly violent when compared to any of the previous Valve games.


          Violence


          *Threatening moments where the player can fall into dangerous, polluted water and die immediately

          *There are turrets that fire at the player. The screen is made redder as more damage is taken, but there is no blood. These turrets are nothing more than puzzle elements

          *GlaDOS is, while not particularly threatening, always implying that she wants to kill the player.
          Language

          *Some uses of very mild language like 'damn' or 'hell'.

          *GlaDOS always insults the player, telling her that she was adopted and left on a doorstep. This is played for laughs though.


          Content Conclusion


          The game is pretty much suitable for anyone, with the exception of those who are very young or easily scared/offended. There is some dark humour that may offend some, but it is mostly pretty light-hearted.


          The Results of Scientific Testing


          The game is pretty good, that is easy to tell you. Some may find it hard, others far too easy. Some may find it funny, some may find it the most painfully unfunny game that they have ever played. However, no matter what you like in a game, and what you really, really hate. There will be something for you in Portal 2. Unless one of the things that you really hate is 'fun', but if that's the case then you'll be hard pressed for choice when it comes to games. Maybe 'Truck Driver 2011' will suit your needs. But until then, play Portal 2 if you want some fun.
          I give Portal 2 four out of five, as the game is apparently a little short (unless you're as bad at it as I)


          - Copied from my Ciao account.

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