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Tampax Blue Box Super

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    7 Reviews
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    • More +
      08.03.2013 17:22
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      A trusted brand

      Although I am happy to shop around and switch to supermarket brands in most areas, tampons are one item I nearly always buy the branded version. My periods haven't been very regular since I came off the pill last year, but even so I have always used Tampax, with my preference being to use the "Super" variety for the first day or two when flow is at its heaviest, and then the "Regular" ones for the remainder of my period when flow is lighter.

      For me, tampons make periods much more bearable, as they contain any mess or smell inside the body, avoiding the constant feeling of not being your freshest "down there" that I often get with sanitary towels. I still use towels overnight and sometimes towards the end of my period when I'm not sure whether Mother Nature has finished or not, but for the most part I prefer to be able to get on with my daily life without constantly checking I'm not leaking or having to readjust my underwear because my towel has become creased.

      The Tampax super tampons come in a green wrapper, which makes them easy to identify easily from the regular ones which are yellow. I know they used to do a light version too, but I'm not sure if this is still the case. The wrapper isn't the most discreet being bright green, but at the same time it makes them easy to locate in your handbag, and you'll also avoid pulling it out of your bag believing it to be something else...it's quite unmistakable. The wrappers stay in-tact despite being jostled in my handbag, although sometimes I've noticed if my bag gets damp from the rain, they tend to start unwrapping themselves, so I try not to carry too many, but instead keep some at home and in work, and just carry a couple for emergencies.

      In terms of using these tampons, they are made much easier by the cardboard applicator. I can remember first trying to use these as a teenager and I just couldn't get the hang of it, but now it seems so easy to just use the cardboard applicator to insert the tampon. I guess it takes a little practise if you're not used to it. The cardboard applicator has a "protection skirt" around the bottom, which ensures the tip is kept clean and doesn't fray or get damaged before you insert it, and also makes it more comfortable to insert. The string is long enough to make me not panic about "losing it", but not so long that I'm aware of it in my underwear.

      Tampax claim that these tampons can keep you fresh for UP TO 8 hours. I put the emphasis on the "up to" because everyone is different, and for some women they may need to change them more regularly than others. I tend to find on my first couple of days when flow is heavy, I change every 6 hours, because if I waited until 8 hours I notice I might start to leak ever so slightly. The tampons are comfortable to use, and I don't even notice them most of the time, so I am free to go sky diving or rollerblading or whatever else it is they feel compelled to do on the adverts. Removal is also easy, and in the 15 or so years I've been using them I've never had any issues with the string breaking.

      Toxic shock syndrome is associated with the use of tampons, so you should always follow the guidelines regarding how long to keep them in for, and also use the lowest absorbency level you feel is necessary for your flow. When I was little, my parents knew a couple whose daughter had died of TSS, so I am very careful and also don't use them overnight for fear of oversleeping and not being able to remove them at the required time.

      A box of 20 super tampons will cost around £1.85, which is the same price as the box of regular tampons, so there's no price increase for the increased absorbency. They work out better value the more you buy, so a 48 box costs £3.99. In my opinion, it's money well spent to make your time of the month a little easier to bear.

      (Review may also appear on Ciao under the username Gingerkitty)

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      • More +
        21.03.2012 20:44
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        Super tampons

        Please be warned this review is going to be a little graphic!

        Tampons, a girls best friend? No. A girls much needed but disliked friend!

        -- Packaging --

        These super absorbency tampons from Tampax come in the usual Tampax packaging. A blue and green (symbolizing the absorbency of the tampons inside) cardboard box.

        After opening the box you come across 20 green packages and an information booklet. This booklet contains information about how to insert and remove the tampons, a little bit about different flows and most importantly, information about TSS (toxic shock syndrome), a serious illness that can be fatal.

        -- Application --

        The tampon comes inside a green paper wrapper that is simple to just tear and open. However, I find that I have to locate which end is which when I open it up to make sure I open the string end first, if I don't then the string nd of the applicator usually falls off and I have to spend a couple of minutes trying to thread it back on again. Asda's Protect range of tampons have a little dent in the cardboard to stop the end from falling off, these Tampax could do with something like this too.

        The actual applicator comes in two parts, the part that inserts into the vagina, and the part that you push to allow the tampon to flow out of the other side of the applicator. The part that is inserted into the vagina has soft ridges in the cardboard so you know where to place your fingers prior to inserting. It also has a rounded end so its smooth and comfortable to insert. Once that part is in place just push the other part in and your tampon is in place! I usually discard of the applicator by putting it back into the green paper wrapper just so that it looks nicer in the bin.

        -- Comfort and removal --

        Once the tampon is in place and I carry on with whatever I was doing, I don't notice that I have a tampon inside. It is so comfortable that you forget it's even there.

        I use the super absorbency throughout the most part of my period and can leave it in place for around 4-5 hours without any leakage. The recommended time to leave a tampon inside is between 4-8 hours, so the super absorbency suits my flow well.

        When it comes to the removal of the tampon, its very easy and pain free. The cord attached to the tampon is embedded right to the very end of the tampon so it is securely fitted and you don't have to worry about pulling to hard and it falling off. With a gentle pull it comes out without any discomfort.

        -- Overall --

        I'd definitely recommend these super Tampax. They do the job they are supposed to do well, and are very comfortable to insert and remove. The only thing I would change about them is the applicator, it could do with a little dent of some form to stop the bottom end from falling off when taking it out of its wrapper.

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      • More +
        27.03.2011 15:28
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        see review x

        Tampax
        ======

        Tampax is a well known name that every woman will have heard of, since I first started my period I have always used tampax, as I do not like wearing pads, as I find them to be unclean. Many years ago these did not come with an applicator, but when they did I decided it must be easy to use than without one, so I started using these.

        Depending on how heavy you bleed each month with depend what strength you need, they have several different sizes. Through the day I usually use regular and on a night time I buy super, as I can not change the tampax as often.

        The box
        ==========

        The box is pretty basic, its cardboard with a picture of the tampax and also the amount that the box contains. The standard box usually has around 20 in. so inside the box you have 20 neatly packed tampax, and also an instruction leaflet that will include the details of all you need to know.

        The price
        ========

        The price can vary on these and will be cheaper in supermarkets but I always forget and end up getting them from the corner shop and from there they cost £2.99p these do usually last for a full cycle.

        How to use
        =========

        These are pretty easy and can be done in a matter of seconds, just take the paper wrapping off, and stick the tampax in, and then just push the applicator end and that's it. It will be in the right place. The wrapping and the applicator they recommend that you put in the bin, but I don't want them sorts of wrappers in my bin so I flush them down the toilet. This can take 2 flushes as they do not always go down first time.

        Absorbancy
        ========

        They do recommend that you change your tampax every four hours, but on a night time I find this hard as I am asleep, which is why I use the super on a night. I usually have around 8 hours sleep and do not normally have any leakages. I do suppose this also depends on each person, as each person has different cycles and some can be heavier than others. I would recommend maybe using a towel also if you do bleed heavy. But I have never had any problems with them leaking myself so far.

        My overall opinion
        =============

        I really like these, they are really easy to use and are really absorbant. They are really comfortable to use and you do not even know that you have got one up. The only thing that I find it that each time you go to the toilet, you need to replace it, as they do seem to dislodge a little bit and then feel uncomfortable, so maybe if you have a weak bladder you would end up using a lot of these.
        I would recommend them to any woman to use, these are by far the best and the easiest of tampax to use. They may cost more than cheaper brands but in my opinion it is worth it. Easy to insert, and lasts long what more can you want. And great for comfort too and at £2.99p I don't think they are that bad.

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        • More +
          14.06.2009 11:49
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          Try these only if you are willing to flush your money down the toilet

          I hate these things. Hate them with a vengeance. I'll tell you why...

          They tell you they are "specially designed to help easy insertion thanks to the smooth paper applicator". I argue that it is the smoothness that causes the problem.

          I normally use Tampax Compak tampons and find them easy to use. They have a smooth plastic applicator with (and here's the important bit) a plastic lip around the bottom of the outer tube. Normal (original) Tampax tampons do not. They have a shiny cardboard applicator with no lip. Instead, they have a couple of very slight ridges at the end of the applicator - so slight that you have to ask yourself "What is the point?"

          So (and apologies - this bit is a bit yucky - those of a nervous disposition should look away now), you are in the middle of (what for me is) a heavy period. You need to change your tampon. You remove the old tampon and dispose of it and are now ready to insert the new one. You remove the packing, assume the position and fully insert the outer tube, grasping the very slightly ridged end of it. Now the problems begin.

          Because of the time of the month (and, afterall, it's the time of the month that is causing you to use the tampon in the first place), you tend to be a bit wet down there. Wet equals slippery. So you are standing in the bathroom, one foot on the toilet seat, half bent over holding on to the end of this little shiny cardboard tube which is now wet and on which you now have zero grip. You try to push the inner tube in to the outer tube and the slight effort needed does nothing more than cause the shiny and now wet outer tube to slip from your grip. The slight ridges at the end of the tube do nothing to improve your hold on the applicator. You have managed to push about a third of the inner tube in to the outer tube but you can't get any further. Any more pushing does nothing more than to push the whole thing inside. Meanwhile, you are still trying to balance on one foot and your hands are too busy trying to grip and push and you have no free hands to hold on to anything to help your balance.

          In disgust, you remove the whole tampon - still mostly in its applicator - and try to start again.... but you need to start afresh with a new tampon as the other one is now a bit soggy at the end. Ugh! Considering they cost about £2.00 for a pack of 20, throwing one away (essentially unused) is not something I relish doing every time I try to change my tampon.

          So, I will stick with the Tampax compak. Okay, they are not quite as convenient because you obviously can't flush the plastic applicator down the loo (having said that I would NEVER flush the cardboard ones either, whether or not it is supposed to be safe to do so). And, yes, Compaks are more expensive but there is no stress and no wastage.

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          • More +
            20.03.2008 11:58
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            Just don't buy it, simple as!

            If you're male or of a slightly sensitive disposition then perhaps you should stop reading now! Similarly, if you're eating, I'd advise you stop reading! Also, if you think of me as slightly 'mysterious', just don't read this! All mystery will be removed! This review is about... p.e.r.i.o.d.s. so if that upsets you - look away now!

            In my stupidity I finished my last period and forgot to buy more tampons, so when I realised I had started my period this month I was not impressed to find just a handful of tampons sitting lonely on the shelf! I trundled off to the corner shop in the frantic hope that they would have something... anything! I use non-applicator tampons, usually Lilets or Sainsbury's own, but the shop only had applicator Tampax tampons or pads. I hate wearing pads as I feel so self conscious, plus I have quite heavy periods so I'm always worried that I'll end up leaking with pads. So, I had a choice of Tampax applicator tampons or nothing... decisions decisions! I reluctantly handed the massive box of tampons to the shop owner (who was so slow at putting it through the till, slow enough that a rather hunky guy walked in...) and handed over my £1.49 and toddled off back home to 'sort myself' (avoiding Mr Hunky's eye on my way out!).

            As the tampons are applicator ones, their packets are obviously bigger than normal tampons. The box is over twice the size of a normal tampons box. Also the packets the tampons come in are twice the size of normal tampons, and so hiding them discreetly becomes a little more challenging! They come individually wrapped in a paper green package which is relatively pretty... for a tampon wrapper at least! In the box there is a MASSIVE instruction pamphlet. It basically contains all the information you'd normally get with a pack of tampons but the writing is three times as big! You can sit and read about what the tampon's made of - cotton and/ or rayon (apparently absorbent material... yes well...), how to insert (including pretty pictures that make it look like inserting a tampon is a lengthy procedure!), absorbency and when to change your tampon, TSS information, and a few questions such as "Will I still be a virgin if I use tampons?".

            So, the tampons themselves. I'd always presumed that applicator tampons had a plastic applicator, but apparently not. Tampax tampons have a shiny cardboard applicator which comes in two parts. The top part of the applicator is rounded and has little triangle pieces which bend open to allow the tampon out. The bottom of the applicator basically does the job of your finger, by pushing the tampon inside you. The tampons are relatively easy to insert (obviously if this is your first time using tampons it may be slightly uncomfortable, but otherwise it's no problem). You simply open your vagina with your fingers, push the top half of the applicator inside you, and push on the bottom half of the applicator with your finger. Inserting the applicator isn't painful, but I find it is harder to place the tampon in a comfortable position than it is with non-applicator tampons. After the first few times though it's quite easy to get used to the angle to insert it so it's comfortable and you can't feel it. Once the tampon's inside you can simply pull out the applicator. I was a little concerned about being left with a cardboard 'thing' inside me and not being able to get it out, but this didn't happen and the applicator slide out very easily! No embarrassing trips to the doctors - phew!

            After inserting the tampon I was then left with a blood covered cardboard tube. I live in a house of males and I'm not sure they would particularly appreciate finding that in the bin! The box says you can flush the paper wrapping, applicator, and tampons down the toilet. This may be ok, but I found that the applicator doesn't flush down the toilet - it won't go round the U-Bend it just bobs up and down in the toilet. So, then you have to stick your hand down the toilet, pull out your sodden blood soaked applicator, and resort to wrapping it in toilet roll and putting it in the bin! The applicator's also quite bulky, so thinking about it, I guess you may end up blocking up your toilet if not your drains with a few of these. Also, the more I think about it, the less convinced I am that it's environmentally friendly to flush a cardboard tube down the loo!

            Normally if I use Super Lilets/ Sainsbury's tampons I have to change them every 1.5 - 2 hours after inserting them before they start to leak. After 40 mins these super tampons (absorbency - 6-9g blood apparently - my arse!) had started to leak (40 MINUTES!) you can't even sit through an episode of Top Gear without having to run off! Also, with the tampons leaking this often I couldn't sit still or relax as I was worried about getting blood everywhere. Anyway, I scurried to the toilet and tried to take it out. Ok, so normally when your tampon's soaked and ready to be changed it slips out quite easily. These tampons pulled on my insides as I tried to take it out, but the tampon was leaking so I had to remove it then. The reason it pulls is because instead of coming out being the same length as it went it, just wider, the tampon was no longer round it was thin and elongated and pulling the tampon out was stretching it. When I did get it out it was about 4 times as long as it originally was and the edges were falling apart, which left me worried that there was still some left in me. This isn't just a nuisance, but potentially dangerous! HOW can Tampax be allowed to make these!?

            I got out a new tampon and unwrapped it from its cardboard applicator. Non-applicator tampons are usually well compact and sturdy. These tampons look like someone's just shoved lots and lots of cotton into a cardboard tube - the tampons are so flimsy! You can't insert these without an applicator as they're so weak and you just end up with a little ball of cotton! The pamphlet claims that these tampons expand to fit the shape of your body comfortably - absolute crap! The tampon wasn't even that blood soaked when I removed it, so the blood must have leaked down the sides. I have never had this problem before - these tampons offer virtually no protection! I had to use about 8 of these tampons before my lovely Boy had been able to get to Sainsbury's and buy me some decent tampons. I honestly did not want to leave the house with one of these tampons in because I was worried I'd end up with stained clothes.


            Ok, so a quick recap:

            1. Green wrapper is quite pretty
            2. These tampon packets are big - though I suppose any applicator tampon packet will be bigger than normally, so I shan't knock marks off for that.
            3. The tampons are relatively easy to insert
            4. You can buy a pack for £1.49
            5. They leak very quickly and so don't do their job, which leads on to...
            6. You can't really leave the house or you'll end up with stained clothing
            7. They stretch inside you as you try to pull it out, and they fall apart which is potentially DANGEROUS!!!
            8. You have the problem of disposing of a blood sodden cardboard tube
            9. They're crap absolute crap!
            10. You will still be a virgin if you use them though!


            Recommend them - Nooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo! They were £1.49 from my corner shop but I'm not going to tell you how much they are in Boots or anywhere because I feel like it is my moral obligation to warn you of how dire these tampons are and to stop you going out to buy them! I was debating whether to write this review as it's not on the most pleasant of subjects, but I felt I ought to warn any potential buyers of the awfulness that is Tampax applicator tampons. Thou shalt never forget to replace tampons after your last period!

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              26.08.2004 16:49
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              Ok fair warning lads. This is an opinion on tampons and there will be lots of talk about womanly bits and ?that time of the month? within these few hundred words. So now you know. No leaving me ?urgh that just put me right off my dinner? comments when you?ve finished reading. Oh and actually the same goes for you girlies too! Right so VickyVickster is a woman and she happens to be at that point in her cycle right now as she types. She also was running low on her usual sanitary towels and was supposed to pick some up when she went out shopping this afternoon. Guess What VickyVickster forgot. So at 8pm I find myself pretty much panty liner-less and with only the local 8 till late type shop open. I go there resigned to paying a fortune for whatever sanitary towel they have in when I find they have no sanitary towels at all. All they have are box upon box of Tampax tampons. Well needs must and I buy a box of twelve super absorbency for the princely sum of £1.69. So home I do trot and off to the bathroom I go to sanitize myself. I have never used tampons before. I have always used sanitary towels (ST?s) and as I don?t swim or wear a bikini or thong type undies I have never had a reason to use tampons before today. I open up the box and see a piece of paper folded up. It is a large piece of paper with lots of information on it! First of all I read the information on Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS) TSS is a very rare but is also very serious. You need to wash your hands before and after inserting a tampon and be aware of what the symptoms are just in case. TSS shows as flu like symptoms and progresses to more serious symptoms rapidly. Some symptoms to watch for are: Vomiting Diarrhoea Sunburn like rash High fever Dizziness Muscle aches Fainting or near fainting when standing up. Skin peeling can occur at later stages of this illness If you notice any
              of these symptoms immediately remove your tampon and then seek medical attention. To further reduce the risk of contracting menstrual TSS you can us a pad instead of tampons for one day of your menstrual cycle. (So it says in the leaflet) and also be sure you use the minimum absorbency required to meet your need. If you are at all worried then simply don?t use tampons! So I turn over and actually get to the insertion instructions. OK this is a good hint. Don?t read these instructions before you open up your tampon. You?ll just get very confused. Also make sure you look at the diagrams first, they are much more helpful than the written instructions. Read those last. Ok so you take your Tampax tampon out of the packet (after thoroughly washing your hands) and you have a cylindrical cardboard tube with a rounded end. You pull an inner tube out from that tube and end up with something around 4 inches long with a string hanging out of the end. What you need to do is find a comfortable position. Sit on the toilet with your legs wide apart or squat down with your knees apart (only for people with very good centres of gravity!) or stand with one foot on the toilet seat. I started out with one foot up on the toilet seat and made the first attempt. I failed miserably. I couldn?t grasp the outer tube and push in the inner tube at the same time. I took out the tampon and started again (it was still all intact) sitting on the loo. I faired a bit better here but I still found the applicator a bit fiddly. I think this will be something that needs practise. To insert you simply open your vaginal lips with one hand (keeping them out of the way) and gripping the tampon round the ridges on the top most tube you push it in until your fingers are touching your body. You are left then with the inner tube hanging outside your vagina. If you?re having difficulties try to relax. Remember your vagina slopes b
              ack so aim towards the bottom of your back. Try gently rotating it or wiggling it form side to side if you still are having problems. Really if you relax you should be fine. I found this part very easy it?s the next bit that gets fiddly. Now you need to keep hold of the outer tube and extend your index finger and press on the inner tube pushing it up inside the other one until it is completely inside. This is fiddly. Don?t panic but do try a different position if you find yourself unable to manage in the position you are in. It will go in easily once you get your finger on it just right. Then you simply gently slip the tubes out of you and the tampon is sat snugly inside you. Tampons actually expand to fill your vaginal canal so don?t worry about one slipping out. You shouldn?t be able to feel it inside and if you can its possible the tampon isn?t sitting high enough up. Just remove it and start again. You can wear your tampon from four and up to eight hours so you can wear one over night. If you do though make sure you put one in just before going to sleep and take it out first thing when you wake up. To remove a tampon you simply pull on the pull string and it should slide out. If it doesn?t make sure you?re relaxed as otherwise your inner muscles will be as tense as you are and will hold your tampon in. The string really should not break as it is sewn all the way up inside the tampon itself. If it does break however you should be able to retrieve the tampon using your own (clean) fingers. If not then as embarrassing as it maybe you need to see a doctor to get the tampon out. Keeping it in will only increase your risk of TSS. The tampon won?t fall out of its own accord as it spreads out and fits snugly inside you. You can simply flush the applicator and tampon down the toilet when you are finished as they are completely biodegradable. That is a definite plus really! So what is my verdict? I cannot say
              I have come to hate the little absorbent torpedoes but then I am not going to give up my pads for them either. To be honest the TSS thing does put me off using tampons regularly. I just don?t want to even run a slight risk with something so nasty. I do however think they don?t feel uncomfortable and they are fairly easy to apply. I guess it just takes a bit of practice. I am not so happy with the price either but I guess you can get them a lot cheaper if you shopped around. The absorbancy is good though you do need to find the right type for you.Tampax do a multipack which is great as women's flow alters so much over the course of a period sometimes. Overall I sit firmly on the fence here. I myself prefer to use sanitary towels but I can see the advantages to using tampons. Just make sure you do it safely. So I hope I didn?t gross you out too much! Thanks for reading and rating and I promise not to talk about my womanly bits any more. Well in the near future anyway!

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                23.06.2001 04:48
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                When I was 12 the nurse did her rounds at school and we was all handed these strange little blue boxes with things called tampons. Although the idea seemed a bit gross i went home and tried one thinking i'd be a "woman" Unfortunately this killed like hell and i immediately left them to rot in my drawer. Since then, i have religiously used sanitary towels until one day I lost my virginity and for some strange reason i thought i would be easier to try using a tampon. It was the best thing i ever did! The first time i ever tried it i felt a little uncomfortable because i was conscious of it but after that, i soon forgot and there really is benefits. For a start off, i no longer get the leakages out of the sides of my sanitary towel (and yes i was even using ones with wings) and have to bathe my trousers in salt. I would also like to mention at this stage that most girls can insert a tampon with their hymen still intact. Using a tampon does not make you lose your virginity. Another strange thing, maybe this is just me, but i have felt less stomach cramps. Maybe this is because i dont feel so horrible down below and am lessed stress because i can forget about being on a period. The idea has been around since 500 B.C. but was made more everyday in In 1930 when Doctor Earle C. Haas, a physician from Colorado decided to help his wife who found towels uncomfortable. At the moment you can purchase Tampax super from Superdrug or Asda (they have taken off the VAT!!) from around £2.20. Although they look thick, they're actually very easy to insert and you can hardly feel them. If you are worried about leaking then wear a pantyliner but i have very heavy periods and have had no accidents yet (fingers crossed!!). Tampax really are a good choice. Although they're a little more expensive, it really pays in the long run for comfort and assurance. If you have never tried them before don
                9;t worry. Each box comes with a leaflet that is very detailed and includes information on TSS (Toxic Shock Syndrome), How to insert a tampon, and some great coloured diagrams. If you've never tried them before, i suggest you do. I was once strictly against the idea but now i wish i had discovered them ealier.

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            • Product Details

              Tampax tampons are specially designed to help easy insertion thanks to the smooth paper applicator. They give you effective protection as they gently expand to fit the shape of you body. Tampax tampons, applicators and wrappers are biodegradable