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    15 Reviews
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      13.04.2010 19:29
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      great pets, if you are willing to take care of them.

      Thanks to FourPaws tips this is an edited version of my review. In my opinion, if you are devoted enough to want a lizard, I think the easiest one to look after is the leopard gecko. Because you only have to clean the tank properly (with lizard friendly disinfectant) every 2-3 weeks, they do their business in one corner so you can just scoop it out with a mini sieve like I do, or with some tissue. If you feed your gecko the correct amount and type of food, it should be happy and lively. As soon as I got got my gecko, when it was about 6 months old (juvenile) I fed it on 5 medium sized locusts per day. After about another 6 months old (as is was getting fairly big) I fed it on 3 large size locusts per day but allowing a day off every couple of days. But water change should be daily. If you spend quite a lot of time watching your gecko, or just being near it, it will probably get used to your face, therefore more likely to want to come out of the tank when it gets a bit older. Geckos are great pets, (if you look after them properly) but if you are going to get one, please make sure you are ready to care for it. If you look on the internet, it will probably tell you that leopard geckos don't need a very big tank. But I am all against the small tanks. I don't mean go ahead and buy a huge one, I mean get a medium sized one so your gecko has somewhere to crawl and climb. The way I got my gecko to come out of the tank and walk about a bit was to every, or every other day just put my hand in the tank and leave it there for a few minutes (don't shake or twitch because it might think your food!) and then take it out again. This is so your gecko knows that your hand isn't a threat, so it will be more willing to come out. I have done this for a while now and now when I put my hand in, he crawls straight on. Leopard geckos are fairly easy to monitor when it comes to heat, I just have a medium sized heat mat, it is important that if you get a heat mat, don't get it to cover the whole of you vivarium, only a side or a corner (both sides must have some sort of shelter/house.) This is because your gecko needs to regulate its temperature naturally so if it is to cool, it will go to the side/corner that has heat, and if it is to hot, it will go to the cooler side/corner. And it needs shelter on the hot and cold side because it needs to feel safe and secure, so it doesn't get cold because it is to scared to leave its other house. Shedding, my gecko sheds roughly once every 3 or 4 weeks or so. If they don't eat while/ or slightly after shedding, not to worry, it might just be a bit worried because its skin will be very tender. But if it continues not to eat for a while after, consult your local pet shop or vets, for any additional advice. I haven't got a particularly large tank, but it is big enough for my gecko to be happy and get some exercise. I have got a exo terra terrarium, it is a fairly large one, that I haven't had any problems with so far. For more info on this terrarium, I have reviewed it, so be sure to check it out! Great pets if you are willing to care for one, try what I said, it worked for me! If you have any questions, please ask, I will do my best to answer them! Thanks for reading! And remember, only get one if you are willing to take care of it.

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        24.02.2010 23:34
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        Great friendly pet

        This review is for a particular lizard - Painted Dragon (also known as painted agama). I have had my pet dragon (Draco) for nearly three years now. He was my first lizard and I can't tell you how easy he is to look after! Each day he needs a change of water in his bowl and fresh veg/fruit then he eats live food also. That is it! Painted dragons don't grow very big, so it's like buying a puppy and then them never really growing in size. They obviously grow but not very big. They are the size of a large baby bearded dragon. They also look very much like bearded dragons (but much better as I think bearded dragons just look fat and lazy as they get bigger and older)! Painted dragons can also provide hours of entertainment. Mine (and others that I have read about online) likes to jump onto the mesh on the roof of his vivarium and walk upside down, using his claws to hold on. I am a huge fan of lizards but was really worried about looking after one at first as it is my first one, however I have found out that painted dragons are great first lizards for anyone. Another good thing about painted dragons is that they are day creatures unlike some other lizards (like Gecko's) that are night creatures. My only complaint is that he sometimes wakes me up in the morning by jumping around and not letting me have a lie in!!! Food is very cheap to buy for painted dragons too, it is only really the set up costs that cause the most problems and you can buy a painted dragon for anywhere between £50 - £120. Anymore and I would question it. Having a painted dragon makes me want to buy more lizards, if you need any advice on looking after a painted dragon feel free to get in touch.

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        20.07.2009 22:10
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        A great pet and a fascinating animal that resembles the dinosaurs

        When it comes to buying a pet, you may look for something that is easy to look after, has a personality and is enjoyable to keep and playful. I would say that most lizards have these attributes and they make excellent pets. Not all of them cost a lot to look after, but some can be quite pricey when they eat insects and other live food or pink mice. I will start with perhaps my most favourite - the bearded dragon. This is a very common lizard found in pet shops around the UK. They are grey with beige and light brown colourings. They look like real dinosaurs with their spiky, rough skin but they are softer to touch than they seem. Most of the spikes are actually quite soft. They are famous for their beards, hence their name, which inflates to warn off predators. They also do this when they get angry, and sometimes if they see another lizard or bearded dragon - it's a way of saying hello. They are great lizards as they are very maneuverable and you can carry them around - I used to take mine to craft fairs and everyone would look at it and say 'oh look, an iguana!' Not all lizards are iguanas! Just like turtles aren't the same as tortoises. Bearded dragons are omnivores so eat both insects such as crickets and locusts as well as fruit and vegetables including dandelion leaves, flowers and watercress. They are easy to look after but they should be given a diet of many insects, which can cost a lot. You can buy a bearded dragon for around £60.00, if it's a baby, or you can expect to pay a lot more. Then we have the iguana itself. They can grow to be quite large and very long with their tail, so you must take this into consideration when planning where to keep it. They use their tail as a whip and they have a very cute look too. They have rather characteristic feet, which very long toes and sharp claws on the end. They can run quite fast and have good personalities too. You will find them for a similar price to a bearded dragon and they make great pets too. I used to have a Panther Chameleon, which unfortunately died from an eating disorder. It was my favourite lizard but it was a real shame that it died after only a month. It will cost a lot more at maybe £200-250 but they are really amazing pets. You must keep them in either a tank, or what I had, which is a black-netted box. They only drink from a drip of water due to their mouth and tongue. I think this may the reason mine didn't last very long, as it didn't like drinking from its water or didn't know it was there. They purely eat insects such as small crickets and can eat larger ones when they grow. They are really lovely pets with a somewhat humorous personality as they have eyes that rotate all around. They can change their skin colour slightly too, according to their mood. They also have characteristic feet, which are like little pincers. They pinch you lightly as they climb up your body and it's actually really cute. They move quite slowly and need a lot of climbing material in their habitats as they live in the trees. This has just been a taster of a few pet lizards out there. You may have heard of the amazing Komodo Dragon, which is the world's largest lizard. I don't think you'd want that as a pet, but it's a fascinating animal. Lizards have certain requirements for heat, food and water but they are not too bad to look after. Their food can cost quite a lot but it's well worth the entertainment they may bring. Thanks for reading, Dan ©

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          09.02.2008 13:58
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          a lizard is for life not just a toy

          Althought a lot of you will have read about my various lizards in the past , i just had to wright this one as i couldnt find anywhere else on dooyoo to tell you about buddy. As this is supposed to be about lizards in general i suppose i should generalise a bit so here we go, We have at the moment as family pet, ziggy the iguana, who i wouldnt recomend as a pet, at 6 foot long it would be near impossible to keep him in a viv big enough for him to have the freedom to move around so he roams around our living room, eating anything he sees you eat, pooing anywhere that takes his fancy at times and generally harrasing the visitors, he is tolerant of us but hates anyone else and given half a chance he will bite them, there bites are not just nips they tear whole chunks of flesh of there victims and have been known to break bones so be ware of these as pets, Spike the bearded dragon who as pets go is possibly one of the better lizards to keep, only getting to 2 foot long nose to the tip of there tails means they wont need a viv that takes up half of your house, coming from a dry arid place naturallty means they have adapted to eating more or less anything they can get there hands on but you cant give them chocolate, caffeen, rhubarb or avocado. spike eats everything he is ever offered. Beardes are very friendly to humans but hate any other animals, these are best kept on there own. They are very handlable and will enjoy sitting on your lap watching tv with you. spike is even stupid enough to chase ziggy. Buddy my water dragon is who i realy want to tel you about, he is an adult male water dragon, he is 2 and a half foot long, 15 years old and bright green in colour with blue and pink around his mouth. water dragons are by far my favorite lizard but are very difficult to raise from babys as they suffer with a lot of deficiencys in captivity, are very clumbsey and fragile. We had a baby called lilly who fell offf her log wholst sleeping and broke her neck. Buddy was wild caught as an adult so doesnt have any defficiencys and we aquired him because he was being neglected, he lives in a 6 foot by 6 foot viv with a water fall in one corner for him to bath in, buddy loves water, loves a fuss, is tame enough to take food out of your hands. He is a fussy eater though, he will only eat meal worms, locusts and bananas despite water dragons generaly eating a widely varied diet. Water dragons are very clean aswell, only pooing in there water bowl so you wont have to change the substrate as often as with other lizards but you will either have to change the water regularly or have it filtered as i have. Buddy loves company and i am going to try to get him a friend, he loves Ziggy and spike but they dont like him. Water dragons are not agressive, the extent of there agression is bobbing there heads, waving there hands which is very comical to see a little green hand waving at you and eventually they run over and lick what ever they are being agressive towards, no biteing or anything so these are good in groups. you can always tell if buddy isnt happy because he goes dark green instead of brightly coloured. Lizards realy do make great pets if cared for properly, they will interact with you just like a dog would and love your company.

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            13.10.2005 16:38
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            very good first pet - friendly - cute

            Im a big fan of lizards ive had them all, dragons, iguanas, anoles, monitors and now for the second time i have berber skinks. Skinks are commonly found in south africa and parks of asia i believe and these specific ones can grow up to 45cm including there long tails. They are a shiny grey(almost silver) colour with vibrant orange markings on them. They feel like snakes - so smooth and not at all scaley and slimey. The chinchilla of the reptile world. They have some good techniques to them as well - they can bury themselves in the sand totally vanish out of sight - they have very small legs and feet which they can lie flat against there body to help movement and they also have protection on there ears to stop it going in them. How they breath is a mystery. The reason they do this is to coll down when to hot. Now i went to the pet shop to look for my new lizards and there is a lot of choice but dont always just choose the prettiest or the biggest. Certain animals can be harder to tame and be made friendly - some start tiny and grow huge bringing the issue of future costs and space. One other thing i advise is find out what they eat because some people dont like keeping mice in the freezer and crickets in the fridge. My skinks were in a tank with a bearded dragon who bit one of there tails of and nipped the others head so i became the knightin shining armour and saved them. Now set up costs - i already had a 36 inch tank so i saved a few quid - this normally cost up to £50 including roof and glass panel. Then you require a heat mat which is on 24/7 this is around £16.99 (optional thermostat £22.99 this turns of the mat whilst at a certain temperature) then heat lamp - roughly £4.95 - also for vitimans and calcium they need a UV strip light which is £16.99 + £16.99 for battery pack. obviously theres then decoration - reccomended spend here is £30 - this is for grass mats and sand background picture - rocks, slate, bark, logs, plants, water bowl. Then there optional items - thermometers - humity gauges etc but not essential. Also food is needed but this is around £3 - £4 for some crickets and mice. Only pinky mice though mind you. So mine came to £147.96 - but my skinks were discounted and i had a tank. you would be looking at £200 initially and then replenishment of foods vitamins and further decor. However to look at once youve finished is joyous. - it looks very homely for them (i even got mine bright red sand) They need feeding every other day and cleaning whenever you see necessary including as soon as you see any personal mess they make. The skinks themselves come pretty much ready tamed - they are naturally friendly creatures and good climbers - just like bearded dragons they are very trusting and will happily climb on you and then just sit there. - they love to get as high as they can so the top of your head is a favorite spot. There our a few rules though. If your skink has buried itself you should never disturb it - you will annoy him and it will go in a mood with you. Also if its obvious they dont want to come out - dont make them! They need fresh water daily as they like to bathe occasionally but usually only drink before they shed. They are quite fun to watch as well burying away climbing and hiding - and they look gorgeous. These make a very good first pet and are good for the younger ages too - but you do have to have time for them other wise it can all go wrong.

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              24.07.2002 06:16
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              Leopard Gecko's were not something I had considered keeping until a year or so ago when my mum bought one home in a tank which now sits proudly in her sittingroom. However, I quickly warmed to them and their obvious charms. The Leopard Gecko is part of the lizard family Gekkonidae and their latin name is EUBLEPHARIS MACULARIUS (yoo-blay-fair-iss mac-yoo-lair-ee-us)which roughly translated means spotted eyelid gecko. They are pretty little lizards although they are very unlike most geckos. For a start they have not got the conventional flat toe pads that enables most geckos to climb well but rather have tiny toes ending in claws. They are general about 8 inches long although some can reach ten inches and as adults are a sort of yellowisn colour with some light purple-brown patches - the leopard 'spots'. They have a ridged tail which is fatter in the middle and acts as a food store. As with most lizards this tail will break off if too much pressure is applied to it and acts thus as a self defence mechanism. Once this has happened a new tail will grow in its place but it has not ridges and is much shorter. They have a strange feature in that light can pass all the way through the leopards head via the ear openings. A healthy lizard has bright clear eyes and a clean mouth and nose. They are fairly chunky lizards and have quite fat tails. They have five toes on each of the four limbs and a smooth white belly. These lizards need a tank to live in - preferably all glass, or wood with a glass or plastic front window known as a vivarium. The bottom of the tank is lined with some form of substrate be it newspaper, dried bark chippings or sand. If sand is used the Geckos will often eat it, although no one is quite sure why. Leopard Geckos are clean animals who will only defecate in a designated toilet area so the tank is very easy to clean. In the tank should be an area to hide such as a hollowed out log or some form of hide box. It should also contain some form of heat source such as a spot light bulb or heat mat placed at the opposite end of the tank to the shelter. A light source is also neccesary, set on a timer, to give the lizards a sense of day and night and, in the case of full spectrum bulbs, provide them with the Vitamin D usually obtained from the sun. Plants and suchlike are nice for decoration or a place to shelter or climb on. Heres the bit that may put some people off. Leopard Geckos are insectivorous - they have a diet consisting of crickets or sometimes mealworms, waxworms or pinkies - new born baby mice. However, most people tend to use crickets. The crickets themselves act as 'packaging' for the food inside them. This is a double source of nutrients for the lizards - from the cricket and from the food they have eaten. For this reason it s neccessary to feed the crickets first in a process known as loading for at least 12 hours prior to feeding. This means almost keeping two sets of animals. It is often advantageous to dust them in vitamin dust first. I personally have a 'cricket corale' which is a tub with a tube in the lid. The crickets hide in the tube. When it is feeding time I take the tube out and cover the end with a foodbag - the sort you would wrap sandwiches in and tap the tube to knock the crickets into the bag. I tip in some dusting powder and empty the whole lot into the tank. Regular drinking water is also a neccesity and should be regularly checked as they like to bathe in it. If you are keeping more than one gecko you should only keep two females together (unless you are planning to breed) and need to watch them when they are introduced into the tank together in case of signs of aggression - I kid you not our first lizard ATE the second gecko we put in there although having asked about this is such a rare phenomenon as to be practically unheard of. When we bought another to put in we made sure t hey were of similar size as the other one had been a baby and no problems have cropped up since. Geckos are also not very good at being regularly handled as they tend to get stressed, this can result in them not eating. Although I love having the Geckos in the house I would not reccomend them to everyone. It takes a lot of commitment to stick to the feeding regime and monitor their weight and other health aspects. At present myself and my parents work 120 hours per week plus between us and the only way to ensure they get fed at the correct times is by constant checking with each other and recording it on the calender. We are also experiencing problems where one of our lizards is much lighter than the other and we are having to consider seperate feeding as it seems the heavier one is hogging all the food. I am not trying to put anyone off as I find them a joy to keep but they can be high maintenence for busy people. Happy hunting

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                15.07.2002 08:58
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                The Leopard Geckos is a ground dwelling lizard that is found in Pakistan, Afganistan and India. The Leopard Gecko makes are great pet lizard species because: Small Size:- An adult Leopard Gecko only reaches a maximum size of 8-9 inches so doesn't need huge housing. Heating and lighting:- Geckos unlike all other lizards to not require any specialist UV lighting because they are nocturnal. They will require heating, this is best done simply with a heat mat and a thermostat. Pet Qualities: They species is quite docile and not skittish. This species is a firm favourite with kids and adults alike. Colour: Leopard Geckos are very brightly coloured and very pretty. A Normal Leopard Gecko will tend to be yellow with black leopard spots and hints of purple. Leopard Geckos have now been selectively bred in many different colour including albino and patternless mutations. Hygiene: Leopard Geckos are very clean animals. They crap in the same place so only this area will need cleaning out regularily. It is all the qualities that make the Leopard Gecko the Goldfish of the Lizard world. Though I recommend Leopard Geckos to Lizard keepers I don't recommend anyone should buy one. If you are considering buying a Leopard Gecko or any other lizard please make sure you research the care requirements fully and understand that a long term commitment is need. Lizards are not suitable pets for everyone.

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                  07.04.2002 01:49
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                  • "Time consuming"

                  Think very, very carefully! This is my advise to anyone who is thinking of buying a lizard. I have been keeping reptiles for about 10yrs now and I love all my animals, but they are VERY time consuming not to mention costly! I started off with a little Berber Skink, he was relatively easy to keep and didn't prove to expensive, I brought him a 2.5ft x 1.5ft vivarium, put a heat mat and a spotlight at one end, filled it up with sand and some funishings like rocks and branches and finally a water bowl. He has lived there happily for 10yrs and trebled in size! He is feed six or seven large crickets every other day and the occasional Wax Worm here and there, Berber Skinks will accept greens and fruit, but mine has never accepted them. He is semi nocturnal and rarely stays out for long during the day, mostly he burry's himself in the sand. One thing to remember is the more hiding places you provide in the vivarium, the safer the Skink will fell and consequently he will spend more of his time out and about. After a few years I decided I wanted to try a diffrent species, and after a long think I decided to go for a Bearded Dragon, mainly because of their good temperment and interesting appearance. The Bearded Dragon is more difficult to look after than the Berber Skink and has a lot of requirements that need to be meet if the Dragon is going to remain healthy. With this in mind off I went and brought a hatchling Dragon, a beautiful red morph although his colours didn't fully come out until he was about a year of age! Anyway he was about 4 inches when I got him and I set him up in a 2ft x 1.5ft vivarium with a heat mat and spotlight at one end, much the same as with the Skink but this time a stronger watt bulb was required, because Dragons need to heat up to around 90-100F during the day, which makes dor an extremely hot bedroom!! I covered the bottom with sand, put a round section of cork bark at one end for a hiding place and some diagonal and verti cal logs in the tank for climbing, as they are semi-arboreal. Also it is essential to have a UVB emmitting bulb so that the Dragon can produce Vitamin D3, this helps it to absorb calcium, if it can't absorb calcium it will become very ill and die. Young bearded Dragons are eating machines and will eat 3 times daily on as many crickets they can eat in 1 ten minute feeding session along with some mealworms and the occasional Wax Worm, also he has access to fresh fruit and veg throughout the day, but with all this eating comes alot of messing and they will run around soiling everything in their path! So cleaning of the tank needs to be done daily, witha complete clean out and steriliseing of the tank every month or so. About 5 months down the line my baby had grown to about a foot in length and needed a bigger home so I moved him into a 6ft x 3ft vivarium, Dragons need big enclosures so think hard before getting one! I kitted the tank out much the same as before but on a larger scale, and added more stones so he could keep his nails in trim! The important thing to remember when designing a home for your Drangon is that although they are semi-arboel they need at least 2 thirds of the floor space left free to run around in. By this age Dragons eat less live food and more greens, his diet consisted of about 80% greens and 20% livefood, some people cut out livefood altogether as their Dragon gets older, but I think they need livefood to chase about if not for the exercise then for the enjoyment for both Dragon and owner, there is nothing like watching your Dragon running ten to the dozen round his tank chasing crickets!! The good thing about Dragons is that they are dirunal, so they are always on display, also they are quite intelligent (by reptilian standards anyway!) and they even seem to enjoy being petted for short periods of time. FOr me the Bearded Dragon is the ideal lizard, it rarely bites, it's attractive, it's active and act ually seems to enjoy interacting with it's owner. Although i wouldn't rush out and buy one as they are very expensive to feed when young, not to mention the electricity bill and finally the amount of space they require, they can grow to around 24 inches and need a tank a least 3 times their size and a tank that size doesn.t come cheap!!! If you have the time and the space for a Dragon then I highly recommend them, if time or space is an issue i would recommend a smaller easier to care for lizard like the skink or Leopard Gecko!!

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                    06.11.2001 19:11
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                    When i see people writing about iguanas and how unsuitable they are as pets it really does infuriate me! I have got and Iguana who i have had for 2 years now, she wasnt fully grown when i got her and even then she was 4ft long. Now she is in excess of 6ft long and one of the friendliest animals i have ever kept, this is out of dogs, cats, horses, fish and many more. People say that iguanas are unsuitable as pets purely because they havent researched into their keeping enough, if they had then when they got an iguana it would be happy as larry. Iggy, ( my iguana, original i know! ) eats a variety of vegetable each day with a small amount of calcium sauce on top, she has a home made vivarium with several shelves so she can climb up and down, on her top shelf where she tends to sleep she has a pillow she lays on, she has a warm bath every day as she is potty trained and will only ever go to the toilet when she is in the bath, and when she gets out of the bath she climbs directly onto my bed sits on the pillow and waits for me to put my duvet over her. When i go and put her back into her vivarium downstairs, she does cuddle me i swear, with both of her arms on my shoulders and her head resting on my cheek, im sure shes saying " thanks mum!" So with the right kind of love and attention and looking after iguanas can be just as lovable and cuddly as your pet cat!

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                      27.02.2001 17:51
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                      Well thats not something everyone would admit to but its not what you might think. 'Herps' is the slang term for the study of herpetology, the study of reptiles and amphibians. Well l have 3 leopard Gecko's, (latin name for them is eublepharis macularius)). They are really cute little (about8 inches long when fully grown)lizard type creatures that come from India or Pakistan. There they live in deserts and open grassland. Here in my house, however they live in a vivarium. This is more or less a big fish (all glass is best) tank, with a heat mat under one end and sand all over the base with rocks for them to climb on and under. They are nocturnal and spend a lot of their time sleeping under the rock thats on the heat pad, they like to be warm. They are very cute and pretty, they appear to be grinning at you all the time with big eyes. They are light greyish/brown with dark brown (leopard like) spots all over them. They have a long tail, within which they store a lot of their food as fat, which interestingly if they are under attack they can lose (and it will still wiggle) to distract a possible predator so that they can make an escape and then grow another one. The new one is usualy about half the size of the original but nevertheless its a smart move. They have eyes that are elliptical like a cats and eyelids, unlike other Gecko's that don't have any at all. They feed here solely on Crickets which you buy from select Pet Shops (there's only one within 10 miles of here that sells them). They cost about £2.50 for a box that lasts about a week or so. A tip here is to insist you choose your box and don't but any with dead crickets in as that means the others won't be far behind. It is worth mentioning that you have to put a bit of carrot or apple or something similar in with the crickets to keep them alive to feed to the Geckos (It's a good way to teach children about the food chain). In the wild they eat spiders, scorpians or beetles but l just feed them with the crickets as that is what they are used to, l have tried them on mealworms and waxworms but they don't show any interest. Water at all times is important and a little dish is all thats necessary. It's best to handle them as little as possible really as they can feel threatened and break off they're tails. So only when necessary, like when cleaning out the vivariuim. This does not need to be done all that often, l find that if you take out the poop and pee every few days and clean out completely once a month the viv will stay fresh and clean. They are not dirty creatures and will only mess in a certain area of the viv. They shed their skin on a regular basis and if they don't completely shed within a day or so it may be worth getting an old margerine tub (with airholes) or something and put damp tissue or papertowels in scrunched up. The gecko will wander about in this and the dampness will help to get rid of the last of the dead skin. They are classed as adults from about 18 months and most often they breed from February to September but l have all females so that isn't an issue for me personally but they usually lay about 2 eggs at a time, and they hatch in six to ten weeks. There are a few problems that the Gecko can have they include Mouth rot, where its knocked its mouth area and got a bruise and this has got infected. This is treated by cleaning and bathing in special creams available at good reptile suppliers. Also ticks and mites can be a problem but it is quite easily put right by spraying with a synthetic Pyrethrin spray especially made for the purpose. All the gecko's really need to be healthy and happy is a good clean home to live in and regular supplies of food. There is a special vitamin supplement that you can buy and you have to put the crickets in a bag with the powder and shake them around for a bit before putting them in the tan k and that way the gecko's get the vitamin enriched crickets, its a bit of a tricky one though as the crickets can jump and the last thing you want is to hear that familiar ticking sound in your kitchen. As they are impossible to catch because they make this noise by rubbing their wings together and when you come close to where they are they stop so its really hard. They are a fascinating thing to watch and don't take up much space, are not agressive (apart from to their food), are not expensive (about £30 each) and look very pretty. The children get really involved but its not a good idea to let really small children handle them. Its a great talking point in my house and visitors are fascinated by them. Have something unusual in your house.

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                        17.12.2000 10:18
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                        Lizards can make interesting pets, but one should do their homework before purchasing one of these fascinating reptiles. If you get an iguana or a chameleon don`t buy a hot rock, or under tank heater, as these are arborial lizards! If you don`t want to pay for lights, consider a night lizard, or geckos. You should study the various climate zones that lizards come from, so that you can set-up a proper type of terrarium! You should familiarize yourself with the special requirements of lizards, so you don`t make a fatal mistake! Don`t put desert species in a woodland terrarium. Easy lizards for the beginner may be swifts, lacertas, leopard geckos to name a few. These lizards are easy to care for in comparison to most other lizards. A good light source and hot rock are OK for the day lizards. The leopard geckos require little lighting, and are mostly nocturnal. Don`t be fooled by tame iguanas. This is actually a difficult lizard to raise, and requires large enclosures. Males can be extremely vicious, almost dangerous. they grow to six-feet(1.81 meters), and can be more than a handful! Chameleons(although I hear good things about the Veil) are another hard to care for lizard. Unlike some lizards, where it is OK not to feed for a few days, these lizards require a daily supply of food! They also require a high humidity level. Blue Tongue Skinks and Bearded Dragons, both from Australia, seem to be the easiest to tame. Remember they are from a very warm, almost dry(Desert), climate, and their enclosure must reflect this! Crickets are the main food, supplemented by mealworms. Some lizards require fruits and vegetables, others like an occasional piece of fruit. Others require am occasional mouse, or rat. This is why you should read as much as you can before you buy ANY ANIMAL. Remember reptiles are more to be admired rather than handled, but if you do handle them, REMEMBER TO WASH YOUR HANDS. Enclosures should be kept clean to avoid any health problems to the reptile, and to YOU!

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                          16.11.2000 07:35
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                          Apart from keeping snakes, I have also kept Iguanas, they are about the easiest of the large lizards to keep as the adults are primarily vegetarian, and so can be fed on fruit and salad from the supermarket, a young one can be fed on dog/cat meat, chicken and small insects like locusts. The ones I had loved cheese for some reason. They are quiet and if kept clean do not smell (remove uneaten food and give them clean water daily). Before buying an Iguana think about housing it, they may look small and cute in the pet shop, but within a couple of years they can reach six feet long (including 4½ of tail). The best type of cage for an Iguana allows it to get up high, as in the wild they tend to spend a lot of time in trees and when danger threatens they can jump off and either run or swim away. If you let them out for exercise, enjoy trying to get them off the tops of your curtains as they are very good climbers and also have a habit of jumping. Handling a full-grown Iguana can be difficult, because unless it is tame it will give a nasty bite, it uses its tail as a whip – and that can draw blood (I know!), and they have very sharp claws (think cats claws that can’t be retracted), and if they think they are going to fall they will grip hard even on bare skin (and it does hurt, trust me). Don’t pull their tail because as with smaller lizards they will shed it, to try and escape and it never grows back the same. They are a lovely animal to keep, they can be hand fed when young and tamed, they can be let out of their cage for long periods and to a certain extent house trained – just don’t let them near your plants – if’s its green they will try and eat it (they are the goat of the reptile world). They get to know their owner and can also learn feeding times, I usually fed mine in the morning and evening. Make sure they are kept warm and also have an Ultra-violet light to replace sunlight or they wil l suffer from calcium deficiency (just allowing them to bask by a window is not enough as the class filters out the useful rays). It is best to get expert advice before having one. Well worth keeping, they can be fascinating to watch and are certainly more interesting than a normal pet, but like any pet they should not be ill treated or left with children as if antagonised they can turn nasty.

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                          08.10.2000 04:15
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                          When I agreed my youngest could have a pet of her own..I just knew that at some point it would become my responsibility..Not that my youngest is irresponsible or anything, but she was sitting GCSE's at the time and determined to get to Uni.. And I wasn't wrong..Last year off she went, and oh dear she wasn't allowed pets in her shared flat.. So now I have Scully..A seven year old South African Plated Yellow Throat.. She's not much trouble, if you discount having to feed her locusts( not the most attractive of natures beasts.They will jump about).And as long as I check the vivarium's temperature is right..Switch the 'blue light' on and off at the right time, and change her water regularly, and get her out for a cuddle......!!! Oh yes Scully likes a cuddle..She also likes to wedge herself in inaccessible nooks and crannies if I'm daft enough to let her escape..And I am daft on occassion. For the rest of the time the lizard just sits silently on her log. She dosen't do tricks, can't fetch the paper, or give you a sticky lick.. In fact as pets go..Lizard's are pretty useless..

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                          05.08.2000 03:59
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                          Well it is not the lizards. It is the crickets the churp away and when my cats goes near them they give me a headache. I do not want to get rid of the lizard but i do not like the crickets. I webt to price up noisless crickets but they are 2 expencive so i can not afford them. So does an1 have any sollutions. I would like to here so click on the opionon button below and give me or advice.

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                            04.08.2000 22:05
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                            Iguanas are beautiful, fascinating creatures, but being prone to stress and growing up to about six feet in length means they are not ideal for everyone. If however, you have the time and space for one, an iguana can make a very good pet. Although the original purchase of your pet, its home and heating can be very expensive, general feeding and care is not. It is best to purchase a fairly young iguana, that way you can be sure it grows up with correct diet and handling. Iguanas naturally live mostly up trees, sitting on branches that overhang water. The more natural and spacious home that you can give your iguana, the happier he will be. Like most reptiles, iguanas need their housing to be heated, usually a combination of heat mats and lamps is used to achieve this. It is important that the iguana cannot actually get to the heat lamp as they can easily burn themselves on it. Iguanas are very clean and can actually be house trained. While it is not a good idea to have one living loose in your home, it is advisable to give your pet at least half an hour a day of supervised exercise. You can buy harnesses for iguanas to go for a walk on, but be aware - they can climb trees very quickly. Young iguanas eat things like crickets and meal worms supplemented with fruit and vegetables. Adult iguanas become mainly vegetarian. Most reptile shops also stock dry iguana food. It has been known for iguanas to get very upset and stressed in noisy enviroments, so if you are often having parties, or have noisy children running around, an iguana is proabably not suitable for you. If you think you would like to keep an iguana, be sure to read as much about them as you can, and find a good reputable reptile shop that will provide after care and support (most will also house your pet if you go on holiday) Iguanas have been known to live for around 12 years in captivity, so owning one can be a long and pleasurable experience.

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