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Monitor Lizards

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£4.087.42 Best Offer by: amazon.co.uk marketplace See more offers
4 Reviews

Animal Species: Reptiles / Amphibians

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    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    4 Reviews
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      09.02.2011 10:10

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      Not for everyone but great if you get right!

      Well a lot has been said already, these lizards start off life costing around £35.00 far to cheap, a more realistic price would be £200.00 the reason being it would deter people buying them and not taking any thought on the cost of food housing vet bills and the temperament of the lizard.
      These do get big and quickly mine is a male, almost 30 inches long and not 12 months old just to give a realistic idea of housing costs your looking in the region of £400.00 and that's for a second hand viv you will need two thermostats one for day temps and one for night they can cost £60.00 each you will need at least two lamp holders £40.00 and night time ceramic holder. There are keepers of monitors who say you do not need uv lighting i do use it to be on the safe side after all in their natural habitat they are exposed to sunlight so i think it makes sense. I would not recommend heat mats. As you can see the cost soon starts to mount up this is not including food and your quarterly electricity bills will increase mine have buy £40 a quarter.
      Now getting on to feeding your monitor when babies (4 inch) small crickets and hoppers dusted with calcium every two days you will have to keep a close eye on your lizard as they do have growth sperts, a mistake i made not dusting enough resulting in MBD fortunately i was lucky enough to remedy the situation thanks to a good vet on the subject of vets as soon as you get your lizard register with a good herp vet you never know when your going to need one. As he or she starts to grow an increase in food and size pinkies larger hoppers larger living quarters to they should also have access to water to bathe and to drink.
      I'm very fortunate to have an animal that's not only tame but is also house trained yes just like a dog he scratches at the door to outside for a poo you have to see it to believe it once you have gained there trust you could not want a better pet, it does take time but be patience he will trust you. I now feed him chicks, mice, small, rats, adult, locust, one box of crickets a week worms, slugs, snails, quail eggs he love and provides natural calcium.
      In their natural habitat they will eat whatever they can find rotting food they will not pass up, insects mostly to be fed in captivity to avoid obesity as they would eat themselves to death so avoid over feeding.
      I have mine housed in a 6ft by 3ft by 3ft sand and soil mix for substrate and large rocks for housing large water container, remember they don't stay small for long (3ft to 5ft) so be prepared.

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      15.01.2010 15:33
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      One for the experts

      This is a review of the Kimberley Rock Monitor Lizard.

      I have two pet lizards and they are both Kimberly Rock Monitor Lizards. Unlike other Monitor lizards - which usually grow very large in stature. Kimberly Rock Monitor's are more elegent and smaller. They're "dwarf monintors" and will grow at adult size to 2 or 3 feet (including tail) They have sharp claws when fully grown so you need to take care when handling them

      My lizards' diet consists of:

      Locusts
      Crickets
      Minced turkey (dusted with calcium powder)
      and the occassional minced beef (only on very rare occassions as this is would be like us eating a Big Mac - mm I think I'll review that next )

      I LOVE watching my kimberly's hunt. One of them grabbed a cricket, pushed it under water and kept it there til the cricket drowned. (Personally I think it's a nicer death for the insect than being eaten) The other lizard gets a cricket in it's mouth and bashes it against a log until it dies before eating it.

      The important thing is that the lizards don't swallow a cricket or locust alive...it is a rare occurance, but I have known crickets to start eating the inside of the reptile and then you have big problems.

      They live in a vivarium. Ideally a 4ft by 2.5ft (minimum size for 2 lizards of their size) and have two 40W spotlight bulbs (acting as their sun) and a UV light (for their Vitimin D intake)

      You need a nice log for the lizard to bask on. Basking is essential to a lizards health. They gain energy and digest their food more efficiently if they bask.

      Most of the time, the kimberly's will flick their tongue and get water off leaves or the ground after you spray the vivarium (you need to keep it fairly humid in order for them to shed their skin efficiently) but I also keep a water bowl in there, surrounded by bark and wood chippings to create a natural effect.

      Kimberly Rock Monitor's are relatively solitary reptiles but will do fine with a mate or a partner. They are friendly if handled well and very intelligent.

      They are also climbers. So it is important to include a lot of logs and branches for them to climb up on.

      I love Kimberley Rock Monitors but they are not beginner's reptiles. If you are looking to get a reptile and have no experience, I would start with a bearded dragon or a geko. This is because Kimberly's need very specific conditions to keep alive. Gekos and beardies are more hardy and don't grow very big.

      Hope this helped someone! :)

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        04.02.2008 23:28
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        if you do decide to get one let me know how you get on, thanks for reading

        monitor lizards are probably the lizard we have to deal with the most and my least favories.

        Some what stupidly deciding to take in, love and try to rehome almost any unwanted pets means we see quite a few of these and yes they are a pain in the backside to rehome.

        The savannah monitor is the most common one we see as they are brought as cute little hatchlings but people dont bank on them getting to 4 foot long and needing an 8 foot viv to live in or the fact that if not handled very regularly from babies these lizards will bit and scratch you quite badly.

        These lizards cost around £50 for a baby, need there tank to be heated to 32'c and have a basking spot of 39'c.

        They are mainly meat eaters and cannot be kept together as adults to my knowledge.

        Becoming more common in the pet trade now are tegus, still part of the monitor family, these will grow to 6 foot long and can be very vicious believe me, we had a pair in one red and one black checked they were only 11 months old when we got them but they were very nasty.

        After 18 months of trying to rehome them with no luck my uncle offered to take them off my hands, now they have the freedom of a whole room to them selves instead of a cage, have got a lot better in temprement and even come when called by there names.

        He loves them to bits and treats them like pet dogs.

        Im not trying to put you off the idea of a monitor but please bear in mind that they are going to need a very large viv, they will cost around £14 a week to feed an adult and they need a lot of time spent with them.

        I certainly wouldnt recomend these as a first time lizard, they are definatley for the more experienced reptile keeper.

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          03.10.2005 21:32
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          can make good pets if regularly handled but give a nasty bite, 15years commitment

          Well there are a wide range of monitor lizards available but most common in the uk is the bosc/savannah monitor. Now if they are handled from young age they can stay tame then they do make brilliant pets but on the other hand it could turn on you and you could have a very nasty lizard.

          They originate from west africa in the savannah regions eg. Togo, Ghana. They can grow to anywhere between 3-5 feet in length and there lifespan is between 10-15 years. This lifespan means you have to be prepared to look after your monitor for the duration and not just move it on to someone else.

          These lizards are definately only for people with about 15 years experience in reptile handling although someone with less experience could raise a baby as their experience. The lizard will hiss at you and thrash its tail around in a warning if it is angry but then again any animal will get defensive if threatened or provoked.

          To house these animals an adult can be comfortably housed in a 4'x4'x4' vivarium. They need uv lights to replicate the sunlight in the wild (no sitting it beside a window will not do as glass filters uv plus you will overheat the monitor) turn the lights off at night around 12 hours on 12 hours off. A heat source will be required either a light bulb, ceramic heater, or a heat mat its up to you but i would recommend a thermostat to control the temperature which should be around 85-90F. Although they come from the savannah they enjoy a pool of water in their vivarium and caves to hide in. all lizards in the monitor family are carniverous and should be fed on DEAD mice living ones can bite back leaving scars so it is not advised

          As far as price goes it can really vary for young from £30-£150 all depending on how many people have been breeding then throughout the year. The equipment is the expensive part and the cost really depends on how well you want it to look but once you have it it does not cost much to keep running.

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