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Norwegian Forest Cats

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5 Reviews

Animal Species: Cats

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    5 Reviews
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      07.07.2009 16:11
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      Love them!

      It is to my belief, that my cat is partly Norwegian Forest Cat, and partly some other sort of cat. She has the same amount of fluffiness and lion-ness, but she has a different coat pattern.

      I've had her for 6 years now, I got her for my 10th birthday - she was my first pet. I loved her very much at first, but I became busy with all my school work and don't have too much time for her. This has led to her coat becoming very matted. A member of my family tried to sort out some of these clumps of fluff, but accidentally nipped her skin, leaving a little gash. This scared me a lot and I feel very guilty because it's my fault that I haven't been paying enough attention to her coat.

      Anyway, back to the review. Obviously these are cats originally from the Norwegian Forest and have evolved to become great pets.
      They are from a very cold climate, and therefore have lovely long and fluffy fur that keeps them warm and gives them a lion-like appearance :)

      They are easy to look after, but their coat needs additional attention. The fur around their necks seem to get quite matted if not groomed very regularly, and if this problem escalates further, skin gets dragged into the matt. I have to be very careful with my cat now.

      Norwegian Forest Cats are rather friendly in nature, if treated nicely. If you're nice to them and give them plenty of attention, they'll love you back. I don't know if this is typical of this species of cat, but mine seems to be extremely lazy and sleeps all day in the same place! She'll then mooch around at night time.

      So there we go, these are lovely cats and I'd say they're much better than the normal British Short Haired cat that seem very common. They are great for cuddles and are very sweet.
      ====================================
      This review was dedicated to my lovely cat, Cookie :)

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      25.11.2006 03:27
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      The best cat pal in the world ever!

      hiya,

      I have 2 female 10 month old Wedgies, and I have to say without my other cats hearing, they are the best cats i have ever know. That is not including my Black Maine Coone Fecker who sadly got run over on the day I went to the breeders to see the litter of NFC's. They had 5 kittens when I got the sad call from my neighbour about Fecker and even though I was devasted, my husband said I could have both the 2 remaining girls who wernt sold yet!! I still had to wait 9 weeks till they came home but I was so lost without Fecker my husband, on a mad whim brought home this little moggy kitten 8 weeks old. Our other cat a 5 year old white female moggy was a bit depressed and missing fecker.

      Anyway, she hated Matewus on sight and then we finally got our 2 new girls....they were 2 weeks younger than matewus but about a third bigger and now double his size!!! having 3 similar aged kittens in the house is total madness especially at night when they get to that almost a year old phase, its like baby elephants pounding round the house (invested in ear plugs to drown them out! at night)

      Am waffling a bit, sorry... the wedgies are as daft as a brush, sit on the edge of the bath, often fall in whilst I am in it, sleep in the toilet, and drink out of it , climb in washing machine, and some how on jump on top of the wardrobe! They weigh about 12lbs each and are not even fully grown yet and I am so over the moon to have chosen them! if anyone would like to see a pic email me on puz _ok@hotmail.com

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        11.09.2003 08:42
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        Before I start I would just like to point out that even though Ive grown up with cats all my life, Ive never bread them as I like them as pets. So please forgive me if I get any details wrong on the specifics of this breed. When I was about 7 or 8 my aunt was moving house. Now she had dozens of cat which unfortunatly she had to give away. Luckly she gave one of these cats to my family. This cat was Dennis. We didn't know much about types of cats back then so to us, Dennis was just another bundle of fur that we had aquired, bring our cat total up to three. Now i can say that Ive never had or met a more friendier cat than our Dennis. He just never stopped purring or wanting his head sratched. Dennis was a long haired cat of mottled colouring. His coat was of a lightish brown that had strips in it. These strips weren't like tiger strips, they were more spaced. On the top of his head all the way down to the end of his tail he had this very dark brown band. This band of hair was very shiny and flat whereas the hair on the rest of him was frizzy. Its only after we had him for a little while that we took him to a diferent vets. While there we noticed a chart on the wall showing all the different breeds of cat. And there on the wall was our Dennis. So we asked the vet and what d'you know, it turned out that we had a pedigree. Out Dennis, the daftest cat alive, was a pedigree Norweigen Forest Cat. Now in turns of care for this breed I would suggest that you brush them out every day. This was ok with our Dennis as he loved being comb so out lives were made easier. But even so knots do, and will occur and can be a bugger to get out. On many occaision we were forced to cut large clumps of fur out due to the introduction of chewing gum. Never a good thing. Now, as more people know that if you bring up a cat on a diet of anything, they will always eat anything. Out Rosie (an Angora) was borught up soley on dried food as she cant c
        ope with wet. Dennis, on the other hand would eat anything. Wet food, dry food, vegetable, ham, chinese.. you name it. Although he ate some stuff he should have he never was over weight. For temperament I'ld say that these cats are the best. The only cuts I got from him was when he would pad on your lap. When he was happy he continued this slow pad and his claws were always sharp. The only other lasting cut was when I turned on the hairdrier on near him and her freaked out. I still ahve that scar four years later. Other than that he was such a happy cat. He was never boistorous (i think this was because he was neutered) and was the only cat in our house to totally get on with over other cat. Although he was a loving cat he was still very independant. He always came home at night but would still spend most days outside. So these cat only really require feeding, watering, brushing out and of course, lots of cuddles. Unfourtunatly Dennis was put down last year after the vet found tumors in his throat and stomach. I was, and am still very upset by this but it killed me to see him in pain. However he was about 20 years old according to the vet, which is bloody good innings for a cat who ate everything from cat food to chinese. In conclusion, i would highly recommend this loving and adoring animal as they make the idea pet. I wouldn't get it however if you are not willing to spend the time and energy cuddling and brushing such a wonderful creature.

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          14.01.2002 22:18
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          It was a cold night, the snow lying deep after a fresh fall earlier in the day. I’d decided to go for a quick walk before bed, but never got further than the garden. I became preoccupied with a little black bundle of fur that was later to be known as Cinders. A tiny forest kitten had been trying to get into my dustbin, but without success. She’d clawed at the bag (bins were, at the time, just a black sack hanging in an open frame with a lid on the top), but her claws weren’t strong enough to rip it open. She obviously hadn’t eaten for days and was very weak. Knowing full well that you shouldn’t take feral kittens into the home, I took her inside. How could I not? She’d freeze to death if left to her own devices. She’d obviously lost her mother, was terribly thin, her coat was patchy, and she was so weak that even though she feared me, she wasn’t able to run. The next morning I was greeted by a feisty bundle of fur that hissed and clawed at me if I went within 3 feet of her. She was still on the blanket I’d made as a bed for her the night before, and obviously didn’t want me going anywhere near her, so I left her to her own devices. I was very concerned about her, both for her health at the present time, and for her future. Perhaps I was just prolonging her agony if she had to go back to the forest. She certainly wouldn’t learn to fend for herself by being fed kit-e-kat out of a bowl or given a warm, dry bed that she doesn’t need to search for. But would it be fair to keep her in the house? She was a wild animal, not a pet. All through that first day, she never moved from her blanket. She didn’t eat, drink or need the toilet. By evening I was getting worried and decided to phone a vet and hear his thoughts. I was advised to not put her out again. She’d have no chance of surviving alone at her age, at this time of year. By rights, she should have d
          ied within hours of birth, but somehow the mother had managed to keep her alive, but had probably succumbed to lack of nourishment, combined with cold, herself. This process of natural elimination is, evidently, what keeps the Norwegian Forest Cat population under control. I was also told that even wild, adult Norwegian Forest Cats adapt easily to domesticity, so there was a strong chance that the kitten would settle down with us. She did. Cinders stayed with us for 8 years and although I’ve since had more than my fair share of cats, Cinders is the lady I have the fondest memories of. I’ve never owned a specifically bred Norwegian Forest Cat that adheres to set standards, so I’m not going to go into any of that. I don’t care how high the breeders say they’re supposed to be, or how long their coats should be. None of that means anything to me. All I know about is the real thing; those that belong in the forest, but sometimes come into our homes. These cats are a naturally evolved breed, and as they feature in Norwegian folk tales and mythology, we know they’re also a very old breed. It’s probable that Vikings used these cats on their ships, to keep the rats at bay, and it’s considered likely that the Maine Coon Cat is a descendent of the Norwegian Forest Cat. There are undoubtedly strong similarities between the two breeds. Cinders was a beautiful cat. She had a semi-long, flowing coat that was smooth and shiny with protective, water-resistant hairs over a warm, downy undercoat that’s typical of her breed. Her feet were heavily tufted to protect against the cold snow, as were her ears, to protect against heat loss. Her long, bushy tail was held high behind her. Her elegant face was surrounded by a fluffy mane, her snout straight and pointed and she had eyes that positively glowed. Norwegian Forest Cats are known for having pretty eyes and an alert expression. Although semi-lon
          g haired, these cats are low maintenance. The cats themselves will usually take care of their coats and little grooming is needed. The odd mat may need to be removed, but quite honestly, I could count on my fingers the times I had to do this for Cinders. During the moulting season, some extra brushing is beneficial to help them rid themselves of their thick winter coat, but even this isn’t an absolute necessity. Some people enjoy grooming their cats as they feel it builds a bond between them, others don’t. With the Wegie, as they’re affectionately known here, the choice is yours. The breed has developed through natural selection. Only the toughest cats were able to survive the harsh Norwegian winters. As naturally evolved cats, they have very few health problems compared to breeds that have been bred for man’s pleasure, especially flat-faced breeds. Cinders was only ill once during her lifetime. She’d been away from home for a week or so, and I was becoming increasingly concerned as she was heavily pregnant. I’d put up a notice in the village shop but had resigned to the fact that I’d probably never see her again. It was mid-winter, and anything could’ve happened. Foxes were renowned for taking kittens and older, slower cats, so I figured a pregnant cat, which would also be slower, could just as easily have become fox food. Not a nice thought, but it happens. As it turned out, Cinders had given birth in a barn close by, but her kittens were very weak through cold. The little girl who found her told me there had been four kittens, and couldn’t understand why there were only three when we went back for them. I knew where the fourth had gone, it had obviously died and Cinders needed nourishment, and tried my best to explain this to her, whilst packing the remaining kittens in a blanket with their mother, and carrying them home. Unfortunately, none of the kittens survived. By the next morning, they were all
          dead, and Cinders was very weak. She’d done what her own mother had done; tried to keep her kittens alive, but it had drained her. Luckily, a visit to the vet soon put her right. Most evenings, I’d go for a walk up through the forest and down to the village, and Cinders would accompany me. She loved those evening walks. Norwegian Forest Cats are active cats. Although they easily adapt to the confinement of a house or flat, they have an instinctive love of the outdoors, where they can experience life in the way that a cat should, using their claws to climb, keeping their bodies fit and agile, just the way their ancestors did. They’re often found sitting at the top of high trees, their natural look out towers in the dense coniferous forests. They have thick, strong claws that have developed to enable them to not only climb trees, but to also climb rocks, and will usually come down the trunk of a tree head first. If they are kept indoors, it’s important that climbing posts, with high platforms, are available for them. During the early 1970s it became apparent that Forest Cats would face extinction without the help of breeders, as more and more were crossing with domestic shorthairs. It was at this point that “Norsk Skogkattring” was formed, the official Norwegian Forest Cat Breeders Club, dedicated to the preservation and protection of the breed. However, none were imported to the UK until the 1980s, so the breed is still relatively new here, and there are only about 1000 Wegies sharing our homes. Whether or not Cinders was a pure Wegie is debatable. In all probability, there was some domestic shorthair blood in her somewhere, just as there probably would have been in the first cats that were used for breeding purposes, but pedigree or not, she was a forest cat. She came from the forest, and she loved the forest. I’d like to have another Norwegian Forest Cat one day. They’re beautiful, friendl
          y, loyal, and playful. They thoroughly enjoy the company of other animals, whether human or otherwise, and are excellent with children (not that I’m intending to have any more, but there may be grandchildren one day). But for all their domestication, these are cats that are still wild in spirit. May they always remain so. ~~+~~+~~

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            10.03.2001 00:52
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            Norwegian Forest Cats originate, believe it or not, from the Norwegian forests, where they evolved naturally. They are a longhaired breed, but are unlike Persians in many respects. Persians have squished-in faces, which can make it difficult for them to eat. It is a recognised fact, and foods specifically designed for Persians have been formulated. Norwegians, on the other hand, have a more prominent nose than the average cat. I would go as far a describing it as aquiline. My neighbour gave me an odd look when I described the new kitten as looking "like Meryl Streep", but she conceded that I did have a point when she finally saw her. She now calls her "Meryl Streep". They are a very luxuriant looking cat. The fur is extremely long, soft and downy, and their tails can have the effect of making the cat look half as big again. They have soft long guard furs growing from their ears, resulting in a slightly "mad professor" effect. When viewed from the back, the long fuzzy fur is still very much in evidence. On my cat, I describe it as looking like frilly pantaloons. Again, I do get strange looks from my friends, but they are in complete accord when they get to see it for themselves. The little mane is a feature of the breed. Putting a collar on such a cat is not recommended, as it would destroy its distinctive ruff. This does not present a problem to me as all my cats and dogs are microchipped anyway. Collars have a tendency to be liberally distributed over the neighbourhood trees and hedges, so I prefer not to rely on them. If any of you received the purplish booklets from the Whiskas Kitten Care Pack, you may find it of interest to know that the kittens featured in it are Norwegians and Norwegian crosses. Apparent the slightly rugged fuzzy look is just the ticket - fuzziness without looking too posh. I assume that it is because the breed is naturally e
            volved that they have tongues to cope with the extra long fur. It is common knowledge that a cat's tongue is has a sandpapery texture, but compared to other cats, a Norwegian's is akin to industrial grade compared to extra fine grade sandpaper. My first morning with her began with a tiny tongue the size of a 5p coin lovingly cleaning my eyelids. It was very sweet, but industrial grade sandpaper should never be applied to eyelids - please don't try this at home! We have agreed that my eyelids are best left to their own devices, but she will clean my nose, face, fingers and hands as opportunities present themselves. She's tried cleaning the dogs, but I think that their fur has an unacceptable flavour. She has tried resorting to simply cleaning their noses, but industrial grade sandpaper on a sensitive nose is more than any self respecting dog can stand. If I could persuade an army of Norwegian Forests to use dusters, my house would gleam. Being a naturally evolved cat, they do not require rigorous grooming the way most longhaired breeds do. After all, slaves armed with brushes must have been a scarcity in the forest. You can pretty much leave them to it, although I enjoy grooming her and laughing at the end result, as she tends to wander around with a neatly groomed schoolboy look then. She is the friendliest of cats, the only one I have ever met who uses both pillow and duvet in the way they were meant to be used. She doesn't always do so of course, and sometimes spends the night under the bed or on the duvet. But more often than not, she will settle down beside me, head on the pillow and fuzzy body under the duvet. Her call is typical of the breed's. It's a very soft purr, somewhat akin to a dove's coo. Overall, her behaviour is what I normally associate with a dog. When walking into a room and encountering me, she calls out. It's merely a friendly greeting,
            and not a request for anything, as she will continue heading towards her original destination. If she wants anything, she will call out, and wait at my feet. Like all my other pets, I did not choose her, but having gotten to know her, I would definitely recommend this breed for someone looking out for a loving companion.

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