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    Your dooyooMiles Miles

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      04.06.2012 17:19
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      Excellent breed of dog!

      I'd firstly like to say that I own two toy poodles, and I absolutely love them. I'd like to also mention that this review is regarding toy poodles rather than poodles in general. Alfie is seven and Hugo is two. As a family we had never owned a dog before, as my dad suffers from asthma, however we were pleased to find out that poodles don't shed hair so we decided to buy a poodle as my sister and I had always wanted one.

      Colours:

      We have two black poodles, however poodles come in a number of colours, for example: apricot; red; cream; white; black; silver (a light grey); blue (a dark grey) and brown.

      Size and weight:

      Toy poodles are very small, however their size varies slightly, for example one of mine is taller and more stockier than the other. On average they are 10 inches or under at the highest point of their shoulder. Their weight therefore also varies ranging from six to nine pounds.

      Temperament:

      Poodle's are very happy loyal dogs, so they offer great companionship, they absolutely love cuddles! I'm not just talking about sitting on your lap, they'll rest their head on your shoulder and snuggle into you. Although they are small, they know how to make themselves heard. Alfie has a very high pitched bark and will definitely use that to his advantage when he wants something. However, Hugo has a low bark and only really barks if something scares him. Poodles are very playful dogs, so make sure you have plenty of toys, both of my poodles like to bring a toy to whoever walks in the door, as though they're giving you a gift! Despite being told that poodles will only need a short walk, my dogs love going for long walks and will definitely tell you if they are not ready to go home, for example, my dogs will sit down and turn his head back the way we were walking.

      A Dog for Children?

      I wouldn't recommend toy poodles for children, simply because of their size which makes them delicate and the rough play that children may engage in with toy poodles, may make them unintentionally aggressive in order to protect themselves.

      Grooming:

      Toy poodles will need to regularly be groomed, and particular attention will need to be paid to their ears. Both of my dogs have problems with wax in their ears which is common for poodles. Therefore to keep on top of this any hair inside the ear canal should be pulled out, but extra care needs to be taken when doing so.

      Overall, toy poodles are very loving dogs with active personalities requiring lots of love and attention.

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        14.04.2012 15:59
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        over all fantastic little dog!

        Dogs have always been my favourite anilmals. I first owned one at the age of Thirteen a little border terrier cross acalled Emma, she was a love lovely little dog. Then over they years I owed Samoyed, Papillon. German Spitz, Japanese Spitz. Over my life I owed ten dogs, that is good going for my age of thirty four.

        About Daisy~

        I have owned my lovely white toy poodle Daisy for just over seven months now. I purchased her from a couple who could no longer care for her as they both had ill health. She lived with another Black toy Poodle called Solomon who was rehomed also and went to live with a male friend of minre and his family. Both where in a sorry state very under weight covered in fleas never been groomed and where both very nervous little dogs. As soon as I got Daisy home I gave her a bath sent her to the groomers and had her fleas treated. My poor little darling only weighed five pounds in weight and for a toy at just over a year old that was awful. The weight range is ten pound for a bitch and twelve pound for a dog.

        Since I have had Daisy she has come on leaps and bounds and now weighs her correct weight loves food loves life to the full. When she is not home with me she stays with her other Mum my best friend Melanie . We both spoil her to high heaven, and enjoys a run on the beach as we both live in Weston Super Mare in the West Country. Now summer is on it's way we are hoping to hoping to take her to a fun dog show.... I'm sure she will win something even if she doesn't Melanie and I will still be proud of our Daisy-Beau.

        Poodles temperment~

        They where first bred for retreaving ducks from water a few centeries ago. Alot of the dogs drowned and that is when the differant clips came in. Take the lion clip for example trimmed on the hind legs back and a main like a lion this was used to prevent the dog from drowning.The poodle is a very loyal faithful companion, they are very easy to train and love to please their owners are a happy little dog love cuddles and being the centre of attention. They get on fantastic with other dogs and children alike.

        Poodles are made from wool so have to be bathed and grromed regualary the fur can matt very easy for this reason daily grooming is advised, making sure you brush frm the root to tip. It is important you brush in the direction of growth. My little girl is such an attention seeker I know non of you will believe me but my Daisy speaks she says; No and Mum. My friend who has Solomon says he does the same he speaks too lol.

        I would say to any one thinking of purchasing a dog to get a Toy poodle you won't be dissapointed you will have fifteen to twenty years of fun with them.

        Always buy your puppy from registered breeder and always make sure you see Mum too.

        Costs anywhere between £550- £750.

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          30.10.2011 16:26
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          Beautiful!

          My best mate owns a poodle. You may ask why that has got me here to write a piece on one, well it started off as her dog but now we have shared ownership. My mate stays most nights with me and when she doesn't Daisy stays with me rather often. I'm sat writing this review now with her head on my laptop (the dog not my friends lol) trying to get my attention and to stop me writing whilst my mate has gone shopping! Shes such a dear little thing I had to write about her today.....to say I'm in love is an understatement!

          Daisy The Toy Poodle:

          Daisy is white, small and of course curly haired as all poodles are with a soft, wool coat. Shes one years old after my mate spotted her on an advert to be got rid of in Pets At Home. Daisy was living in a caravan and to say she was neglected was an understatement. when I saw her she was a scruffy, undernourished little thing, with sad dark eyes and no idea to even play. At the same time my mates other mate bought the other poodle that there was available, a black one called Solomon who was Daisy's brother and was even more timid and scared than she was.

          Daisy has since been loved by both of us to within an inch of her life. Spoilt isn't the word with this pooch! She eats the best, gets away with everything and owns us and not the only way round lol. Because shes had such a hard year we make up for it and she loves it! Daisy has since been groomed at a parlour and looks fabulous though had to be mostly shaved due to the knots and likes that she had and believe me she is full of spirit, life and beans with smiling eyes nowadays!

          The Poodles History:

          Well this is all rather unclear. I was always of the belief that poodles originated from France but after reading a book about Poodles recently some people believe that they originated from Germany or Russia though it is readily believed they come from Asia. I had read they were originally bred for the art of catching ducks 'ducking' but this is unclear however it is accepted that these are water dogs and the long ears are meant to help with swimming!

          You can get Standard (the largest of the poodles), the Miniature and the Toy varieties. All are similar in appearance but for size of course and they are available in Apricot, White, Brown, Black and White and never do you get a poodle that is of mixed colour. These are dogs know for their allergy free coat and that they don't malt which is fabulous and they feel brilliant to stroke too lol!

          Temperament:

          Not only do I have contact with Daisy on a daily basis my other friend owns two standard white poodles, Amber and Dougal. I have to say that I am enthralled by the lively, fun personalities that all of these have! They do need a lot of attention, grooming the lot but what you get back is just pure joy from these loving dogs! All of the poodles I know are loving dogs, respond well to commands and are easy to train and fiercely loyal to their families.

          Grooming And General Care:

          Yep this is a bit of a pain. Without grooming the pom pom heads go straggly and so we groom Daisy daily. She loves being bathed and groomed though (being a water dog!). They do need defleaing and the all other treatments other pets have of course. Cuts are different for Poodles too with the lion cut and puppy cuts and the likes, people go crazy with these dogs having them primped and preened, personally we don't like that but its worth talking with a professional groomer if interested.

          Basically:

          Although I wouldn't go out and buy a poodle myself, Daisy is just one of the most amazing, loving and intelligent little dogs I have ever comes across. With her bouffant hair do and dangly ears she simply makes me smile and shes proper haughty to! When walking her I/we never get far without someone stopping to speak to me/us and basically shes a proper girly girls dog! With her almond eyes and her fun personality I simply love her. Do I now recommend poodles...sure I do! I'm a big fan lol.

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            25.10.2011 22:29
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            Wonderful pets if they're the right match for your home and family.

            Poodles are one of the most distinctive and instantly recognisable breeds of dog in the world, but what are they actually like to live with? As a relatively new poodle owner I shall try to share what insights I've gained into the lovely breed and offer some tips and advice!

            Poodles come in three sizes, from largest to smallest they are the Standard, the Miniature and the Toy. Height is the only thing that really marks them as different, the three types have very similar health, temperament and care requirements, with the notable exception that the Standard will cost you a lot more to feed than the littler ones!

            Poodles were bred as gun dogs originally, retrieving the birds and other game that their hunter masters shot. They are still used as working dogs in many countries, as sniffer dogs, search and rescue dogs and assistance dogs for disabled people. According to a fairly thorough study they are the second most intelligent dog breed after the border collie, they are highly trainable and can be seen competing in obedience, agility and pretty much every type of dog 'competition'.

            Because they are so bright, they require a good amount of mental stimulation to be happy as family pets. They aren't content to laze around the house dozing like some other breeds I've owned! They will get bored easily and become stressed and hyperactive if they don't get the interaction and the challenges that they thrive on. I would suggest to anybody thinking of getting a poodle that they should plan to attend training classes from early on, and consider continuing with some sort of formal activity such as agility or heelwork to music throughout the dog's life. They really do thrive on having something fun and engaging to concentrate on, and its remarkable to see how quickly they learn.

            Poodles of all sizes require a good amount of exercise, even my tiny 5kg Toy Poodle loves a good off lead run for at least an hour every day, they are active little dogs, not docile lapdogs by any stretch! Walks are also a great way to provide some stimulation for the dog, with so many new smells, sights and sounds to take in!

            The famous poodle coat doesn't look after itself I'm afraid, they have very unique fur, there's no undercoat and when the hair sheds it doesn't fall off the dog but becomes entangled in the curls of the coat. This means that your poodle will need regular trips to the groomer for a trim and you'll need to brush them every day in between visits to make sure they don't get tangled or matted. If your poodle is as active as mine you'll also need to keep them free of mud, leaves, insects and other random debris that they enjoy picking up and bring home in their fur! The famous poodle 'show' haircuts aren't to everybody's tastes but they aren't compulsory, you can keep your poodle's coat shorter and more manageable if you want, I do!

            Poodles are the original 'hypoallergenic' dog, you'll have probably heard of several new 'designer' crosses from poodles, such as labradoodles and cockerpoos and so on. If you are allergic to dogs then an actual poodle is a far safer bet than any of these new crosses, I am very allergic to most breeds of dog but am not affected by poodles at all, even when grooming or bathing them. An added bonus is that your house and clothes don't get covered in dog hair!

            Poodles are wonderful dogs to have around, if they are properly trained and socialised then they are friendly, eager to please, bright and very responsive to training, they bond to their family, they get on well with other dogs and they are frequently hilarious. I can't imagine my life without my little ball of fluff at my side these days!

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              25.07.2011 23:39
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              A great dog breed (especially my Leo)

              After our Siberian Husky died, my parents were certain that another dog would definitely not be on the cards. With my persuasive ways, however, I managed to make my mum fall in love with toy poodles. They are the smallest of the 3 variations, literally being toy sized. Slightly larger than this is the miniature, then the standard sized poodle. Once my mum and I had began working on my dad to also convince him we started looking into breeders and where we could possibly get one from. I had decided that I wanted one that was 'apricot' coloured, in our day to day life we could probably refer to the colour as ginger, possibly chestnut. It seemed that they were one of the rarer colours and seemed quite a lot more difficult to get hold of but we eventually came across a breeder who lived about 50 miles from you.

              Coincidentally, one of her dogs had just had a litter of puppies and within the next few weeks we went over to have a look. As soon as we got there I had my eye on one little puppy straight away, who is now better known as Leo. He was born along with 2 brothers and a sister, but he seemed the cheekiest and most willing to come forward for a sniff. At 7 weeks old he was absolutely tiny and could fit in the palm of my hand (my hands aren't big!) and he continually tried to snuggle his head into my sleeve. When we had to leave, he clung onto my jumper and I knew I just had to have him. He came from an Australian pedigree bloodline and he is quite highly strung. His relatives had competed at a high standard in CRUFTS competitions so we ended up paying quite a hefty price for him although it was worth it.

              When we collected him a few weeks later he was still tiny and remained that size for quite a while. I had bought him a bed that was in the shape of a huge slipper and he had a toy that was initially bigger than him. It seemed that he suddenly had a growth spurt around the age of 1 and he gradually grew slowly from there until he reached his full size which at the age of 4 he stands fully grown at 11 inches tall (or small!). His colour lightened slightly over a period, so he is now a light apricot and always catches peoples eye when he goes anywhere. Although his fur is nice to look at, it grows very quickly and requires regular trimming every 4 to 6 weeks in order for it to remain tidy, otherwise it will become matted. On the bright side, he doesn't shed any hair at all as all Poodles don't making them great for being with allergies.

              Leo's intelligence factor, similarly with all Poodles is outstanding. He can do all the tricks under the sun when he feels like it, even a high give! I took him to puppy training and agility classes when he was younger which I feel gave him a good start with his obedience as he is very responsive now. His hearing is a million times better than mine too! When my mum gets home from work, he can hear her car before she even drives into our street and he will start getting excited.

              For all his good points he is a little yappy and extremely territorial at times. When the postman comes he will bark for about 10 minutes until he is convinced he has gone (... its not much of a bark at all!) and other general silly little things get yapped at. The term Leo the lion developed when he used to growl at people who went near his bed if it had food on it. We joked about it as he is just so small, his growl is more like a whisper and you can barely hear it. He has been known to be a little vicious, although its not regular or serious so I'm not sure if this is something common in all small, highly strung dogs of his kind. But generally he is very kind and acts in the manner of a typical 'lap dog' as that is literally where he wants to sit all the time. He craves human attention and wants to be held 24/7, otherwise he will whine until you just have to give in to him :-)

              While he enjoys being a lap dog, he will never turn down a good old walk and I have walked him for miles and miles and he never gets worn out. He has an unbelievable amount of energy and I really don't know where it comes from! He is so small but can run really fast and he enjoys chasing other dogs and animals out in the open. You can just tell he is enjoying himself. Generally he is a happy little dog despite his little anrgy streak which isn't really much of an issue. Everyone who sees him will say 'aww isn't he cute' or something along those lines and my reply, along with a grin will always be 'I know, isn't he'. A real family, fun loving dog.

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                03.05.2011 11:02
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                A beautiful companion

                I have two poodles, both are miniatures one male and one female. I have had Red who is an apricot, since he was nearly 7 weeks old, he is a pure pedigree and he is now 4 years old. Pippa is white, also pedigree, I have had her for a couple of years, she was a rescue and she is now nearly 12 years old.

                History of the poodle

                As this breed are often referred to as French Poodles, it seems easy to believe that they originated in France, however this is incorrect. The breed of poodle is so ancient it goes right back to the 12th century, when pictures of poodle like dogs were found carved on Roman tombs and Greek coins. But since no one was able to prove the poodles origin, the historians came to the conclusion that as far as modern day poodles are concerned, the breed probably originated from Germany, France and Russia simultaneously.

                In Germany the poodles were far heavier boned than them in France or Russia, the Russian poodle was taller and more refined, similar in appearance to that of a greyhound. The French poodles were more fine boned than those in Germany. In each country they are known to be good retrievers, as they have a love of carrying things in their mouths, they are easily trained to retrieve fallen upland game for hunters. Along with this they also have a love of water and swimming. These were usually the largest size poodles, known as the standard.

                It was during the 16th 17th and 18th centuries, that people began to breed the smaller size standard poodles what we know today as the miniature poodle, following them came the toy poodles. The miniatures were bred to entertain and amuse, as they were formed into dancing groups. But because the ego of a miniature poodle is so big they love to entertain and get attention in return. The big egos of these poodles still remains to this day.

                Once the smallest of the miniatures were bred together, we saw the arrival of the toy poodle, referred to in the past as the sleeve poodle. It was mainly females who favored this size poodle because they were so small and could be carried easily. This made the toy poodle an ideal travelling companion for the ladies of France.

                Toy poodles were so popular that in the late 1700s, King Louis XV1 of France, had a portrait of his wife accompanied by a toy poodle painted, and so the poodle became the national dog of France.

                Characteristics of the poodle

                Poodles come in sizes that range from 3 pounds to 80 pounds, their size is specified as either Toy, Miniature or Standard, they come in a variety of many different shades and they are one of only a handful of breeds that do not shed or carry a body odor.
                Poodles are athletic, active, curious, social and capable of mentally focusing on human behavior in order to learn. They will discover what action brings approval, then they will continue to perform this action just for the attention it brings them.
                Even to the most casual observer, poodles carry themselves with a certain dignity, they are dedicated to their owners, yet they love other people too. They are very playful and exhibit a keen sense of humor, that sparkles from their eyes at every opportunity, in short, they love life.

                Poodle ownership

                If you were considering owning a poodle, you should first consider your own lifestyle and choose the poodle that is going to fit in with you. As each of the three sized poodles have their own special features.

                The Standard - For someone who wants a large watchdog, that does not shed.
                The Miniature - He is the most popular of the three sizes as he is just like a standard with all the same characteristics, only he is smaller in size, therefore not needing as much room as a standard.
                The Toy - These poodles are bred to be small, this is their very purpose, very popular with older people who may struggle to keep up with the demands of a larger dog, but require the companionship that only a dog can give.

                Anyone who is thinking about owning a poodle, should first consider the responsibility that comes with owning one of these dogs. They should recognize and accept that a poodle needs regular grooming, should they decide to groom the dog themselves or have a professional groomer do this for them. This can become quite expensive and so it is important you consider this very carefully before deciding on owning a poodle. A poodle does not shed hair and need to have their hair removed for them.

                It is a good idea to learn how to brush and care for your poodles coat in between grooming, as a poodle should be groomed every 6 to 8 weeks they will need to be properly brushed in between grooming visits.
                The things you'll require in order to brush your poodles coat are, a slicker brush which is basically a stiff wire brush and a metal comb.
                The metal comb is used to help remove small knots before they become big knots and start to matt up with more of the poodles fur, which if left to get out of hand, may need to be cut out.
                The way to brush a poodles coat is called line brushing, it is the best way to keep a poodles coat knot free.

                Begin at the tail end of the dog and brush towards the head, with one hand pick up a section of fur and with the slicker brush in the other hand, draw out the fur your holding, starting at the root end, moving towards the tip. Once all the hair in that section has been brushed out, continue with the next section, continue until the whole coat has been brushed out. Remember to brush gently and slowly taking care not to scrape the dog's skin.

                Caring for a poodle apart from the grooming side of things is very much like caring for any other dog, decide if you are going to feed, wet dry or natural food to your poodle, then feed the right amount of food per day according to size and lifestyle of your chosen dog.
                Toilet training, again is the same as with any dog, the younger they are when you begin to train them the better.
                Exercise is a must for poodles, not only is it good for them but they absolutely love it and should be given every opportunity possible to exercise. This will benefit them, especially in later life.


                My own experience with poodles

                I have had a love of poodles for a very long time. In fact I have always loved dogs in general. Sadly I'm allergic to dog hair and cannot touch or be around a dog for very long. I decided to get my first poodle as I wanted a companion in the evenings, I was on my own a lot and felt I wanted a dog for companionship. My husband was working permanent nights and my son was a lot younger then and would be tucked up in bed a quite an early hour.
                I do know there are a number of dogs who don't shed their hair, but I wanted a poodle and so that's what I went after. Red wasn't quite 7 weeks old when I bought him home, I personally thought this to be a little young to be separated from his mother, but the breeder reassured me it was fine. He was just a small ball of apricot/red hair and he was very small due to the fact he was the runt of the litter. I fell in love with him instantly. He soon got used to his surroundings once we got him home, I had everything ready for him, reminded me of coming out of hospital with a new baby.
                In no time at all he was toilet trained, we only had a few little accidents along the way. I now have a dog flap fitted and both dogs come and go as they please, my garden is 100% secure so there is no way they can get out.

                I read a lot of books about keeping and caring for poodles, I didn't have use of the internet then and so had to make sure I was up to speed with reading my books.
                Red has an annual jab and checkup at the vets, I feed him dry food as I believe this is the best, other than natural of course. Dry food is very good for his teeth, the vet has often commented on how well and healthy his teeth are. I put this down to his food.
                I take him to a professional groomer every couple of months, he's not to keen on this but I love it when I pick him up several hours later, as he looks beautiful and smells lovely.

                Pippa is my rescue. I really don't know why I adopted her, I think I wanted a companion for Red and she seemed to be in the right place at the right time. I got her from the RSPCA, she apparently had lived with an elderly lady who couldn't care for her anymore. She is a lot older than Red and a fair bit bigger than him although they are both miniatures. She took a few days to settle in with us, but Red did not and even now still does not like her. They don't fight as such, but because Red is so spoilt (My fault totally) he is very protective of me, she hardly gets a look in. I have to make sure she gets fuss and let Red see I can fuss her too.
                She also has the jabs and vet visits although her teeth are a different matter, when I first had her the RSPCA had informed me of the amount of teeth they had to remove due to them rotting, caused by the rubbish food she had been eating. She goes along with Red to be groomed and she too looks lovely when she comes home.

                I don't get to exercise them as much as I'd like due to my RA (Rheumatoid Arthritis) I can't walk as far for as long as I'd like, they usually have to make do with a few short trips around the block. From time to time they do get to go on a big walk with my son. We have also taken them for a run in the park on an occasion. But at least they do get out and they enjoy the time their out.

                I hope this has been helpful to anyone who may be considering getting a poodle for a companion. I haven't covered everything I know, but I really just wanted people to be aware that poodles are very high maintenance dogs and you should consider this very carefully before going ahead and getting one.

                I'm giving poodles 5 stars because to me they are the best.

                Thank you for reading my review which is also posted on Ciao

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                  03.12.2009 22:31
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                  an amazing breed much under rated,ideal family dog,ideal for allergy sufferers

                  Poodle........the extra family member!

                  When my cat sadly passed away a few years ago my father in law very kindly asked us if we wished to look after his poodle for a while to help us and the kids with the grieving progress.Well that must have been about 3 or 4 years ago.......and we still have her now!!
                  Bessie...or Poochi as she is better known is a toy poodle.There are also miniture poodles aswell as the standard breed.And I would say she is a great family pet and has given me the love for poodles worldwide!!
                  You can get poodles in 3 sizes,standard,miniture and toy.All of these beautiful dogs come with a lovely tempremant and are ideal for families with kids or someone who likes to cuddle their animals as they're very effectionate.
                  Poodles actually get their name from the german word for puddle,and i was just as shocked to find out they're not actually french!!In the days of old Poodles were actually miltary dogs and would be used to carry water and supplies for the troops....hence the name.Despite having miliary roots....and they are still used as police dogs in certain places......they have a very loving nature and make ideal *lap dogs* They love to have a cuddle and enjoy being groomed,they can be somewhat vain!
                  Their hearing is alot better than alot of dogs and this along with the fact that they can be easily trained due to the fact they are amongst the most intelligent breeds makes them ideal dissability dogs,often being used as deaf dogs.
                  The poodle became popular when they became regulars is the circus world.Their intelligence and agility along with general cuteness made them appeal to everyone.It was not uncommon for a poodle to be taught to walk around on two paws in costumes or jump through flamed hoops.

                  Poodles do not need a great amount of exercise although like most dogs they enjoy a good walk.They love to play and often play football which kids love to watch and run around with them.As much as poodles are playful they will happily sit inside on the cool winter evenings.They will quiet happily sit on your knee or snuggle against you.
                  The fact that poodles dont shed is a big plus making the pet ideal for allergy sufferers and asthmastics.The downside being they have to have a visit to the groomers every 4 to 6 weeks,the cut costs about £20 - £25 and your dog will come back looking soft and fluffy with the traditional poodle cut-pouffes and all or you can opt for what is more fashionable, a teddy bear cut (as in the picture above).An occasional brush of the poodles fur will keep it knott free and remove anything that may have founds its way onto them. They are also partial to baths aswell!! They enjoy the whole grooming experience and enjoy the bonding that comes with it.
                  Diet wise there are no problems,the only thing i have found is that sometimes chicken can irritate the tummy...mainly large amounts but a bit is ok.Healthwise there are no major diseases that are really common to the poodle apart from developing catahracts when older,this is especially so in the case of my dog who went blind at 11 but i am told it is a bit earlier than in the general breed.That aside,this doesnt really cause a problem and again it is not necessary going to happen to all dogs.
                  Poodles are loyal and loving,obedient and fun,family friendly and can be great guard dogs.Overall a lovely breed very under rated in todays world.An added bonus being non shedding/malting and ideal for everyone with allergies!

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                    30.10.2009 02:00
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                    Great little breed, perfect for us

                    This is by far the best breed of dog we have had to date.
                    We have a Toy Poodle, which my brother named Scampy, he is an Apricot coloured male with a fantastic personality.

                    Size
                    In all the books it says toys should only grow to 11inch but ours has grown a little beyond that so he does look a bit gangly. My nan has his sister, named Bonnie, and she is a third of the size. So, if you want a really small poodle a girl is your best bet.

                    Temperament
                    Scampy has been very easy to train with basic comands, he sits, lies down, gives his paw etc almost instantly (especially if he knows there is a treat at the end of the act) but he does have his moments where he acts like he can't hear you, especially when he is in the garden.
                    I don't know if it specific to the breed or gender of breed but Scampy loves to be outside, he lays out on the grass in the sun and runs around in the rain.
                    Both Scampy and Bonnie are very loving dogs who like a lot of cuddles, fuss and attention. They don't like to be left alone for too long so this breed would not suit a household that is very busy.
                    They are fantastic with children, always wanting to join in with playing.
                    However, they sometimes can be quite demanding with wanting attention. When my cousin was round Scampy didn't like him being given all the attention so kept stealing his toy cars and hiding them under the table!
                    Scampy has never bitten or nipped anyone but Bonnie has very sharp teeth so can catch when playing a little rougher.
                    Scampy is a lot calmer than Bonnie, he never barks unless there is a sudden loud banging (although fireworks have never bothered him) whereas Bonnie yaps quite a lot. Both these dogs live in seperate houses though and we have been a bit stricter with Scampy.
                    SO for a calmer dog who is easier to train I would stick with the boys on this one.

                    Grooming
                    Poodles do not moult like other dogs but instead it is more like a human growing hair, they do need to be cut or their fur becomes matted and dirties easier. We take both dogs every six weeks to be trimmed down but we have to get Scampy shorter as his hair seems to grow quicker. It costs about £22 per dog at our local pet store so other places shouldn't charge too much more.

                    Food
                    We feed Scampy twice a day with some dry mixer food and wet dog food from a can. Poodles are notoriously greedy so you have to be strict with giving treats. We have Milk Bones from tesco, which are 98p a box. You can feed a small dog upto 6 a day and they are 5% fat and have added Omega 3 so are great for this breed.
                    We also have to be careful about what is in our garden as Scampy has eaten wild mushrooms, which made him sick, and we have caught him licking a slug at nighttime, which also made him sick.

                    This is the first time we have had any type of poodle and all this information is based on the experiences I have had so far with ours. Every dog is different but we have found our dog lovable, adorable, fun and energetic.
                    I hope this review helps in anyone deciding what dog to get as I think a toy poodle is great for a household where there are people with more time on their hands.

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                      31.10.2006 15:00
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                      Poodles are amazing pets, but its often easier to take them to a groomer

                      Grooming requirements in the Standard poodle

                      When grooming dogs the resources and equipment used varies due to their coat types. This occurs with all different breeds of dogs, and the dogs I have worked with so far are only scratching the surface on the different coat types and how they vary when grooming an animal and the things which should be expected.

                      The first thing I am going to do is to quickly explain the use for the equipment which all coat types of dogs will need when grooming before looking at the variations there are.

                      The Bath is needed to wash a dog and all dogs need washing, though some dogs need washing less often than others. This should be done in a large bath and the idea is not to bath the dog at all, it is just to shower the dog.

                      For a large dog you are likely to use a walk in bath as they are big enough to walk into it, whereas with a smaller dog a standard bath may be used as they can’t easily jump into the walk in bath.

                      Bathing a dog can be quite stressful for the dog, so it is important to make the experience as easy as possible for the dog. This can be done by making sure the water pressure is not too high, a gentle but steady flow is ideal to use on a dog, as they can not tell us when we have the pressure too high.

                      The ideal temperature is also important when bathing a dog. The water should be luke warm on the dog. If the water is too hot or too cold on the dog this can cause problems with circulation and burns. The dog may even go into shock so this is very important to look at.

                      A towel is used to hand dry the dog after bathing. It is important to save time that the dog is vigorously dried and the majority of moisture which is in the coat of the dog is brought out by the towel, so that less time needs to be taken with the blaster.

                      The towel is used on all breeds of dog although the smaller breeds may use fewer towels than the larger breeds for obvious reasons.

                      A blaster is used on large breeds of dog to dry the dog. The blaster is used at a distance of at least 50cms from the body to protect the dog from overheating. The blaster should always be used by a person who is wearing a pair of protective glasses to protect their eyes as the moisture will fly of the coat and be most uncomfortable if it goes into someone’s eyes.

                      People should ensure that their hands are completely dry before using the blaster to protect against electrical problems or shocks. Also the blaster should be kept away from the baths etc.

                      A dryer is used on smaller breeds of dog to dry them. This is because it is less powerful and a strong powerful rush from the blaster can be a lot scarier to a small dog! It is also used on dogs with skin conditions or which are very sensitive or easily scared although it takes longer to dry the dog using this, so additional towel drying may be needed.

                      A comb is used on many breeds of dogs to assist with hairs naturally coming out with moulting, but not on the poodle because the poodles coat type is very different to most breeds as it does not moult, so the comb can be a little too harsh as it will pull the hair out and may be harmful, where it is used for the other two as it pulls the lose hairs out gently and the dead hairs.

                      Scissors would normally be used on all dogs. On the poodle scissors were used to shape the tail, legs, head and ears. I have also used the scissors on the feet although usually the feet would be clipped, but my own pet poodle does not like clippers on her feet due to a bad experience at a professional groomers around 5 years ago.

                      The Clippers are used on the poodle. The clippers are used on the poodle all over the body, on the face, on the base of the tail and on the feet usually. This is because the style of the breed standard for the poodle requires short fur in certain areas compared to others and a gradient is produced across the poodle with different lengths in different areas.

                      The reasons behind this style is originated from when the poodle was a working water dog, and the cut was put on the poodle to allow the water to run freely from the fur to prevent pneumonia in the dog as many of these water dogs were suffering from this after working in the water.

                      The Bristle brush is used on many dog breeds but it is not used on the poodle as it would be too harsh on the wool coat and may result in pulling some of the fur out of the poodle which could be quite painful for the dog.

                      The soft metal slicker brush is used on the poodle, because it is quite a soft brush and will untangle the poodle’s fur without pulling it out.

                      The Handling and restraint Methods used

                      I handle a standard poodle usually with the assistance of another person to lift the dog up onto a grooming table, although with my own poodle Sophie, I have the confidence and trust to lift her alone. Always lift a large dog such as the standard poodle with your back straight and bend at the knees. It is important to use a slip lead on the dog during grooming for additional restraint.

                      I believe that all animals can find it stressful being groomed, even if they are groomed daily and are well adjusted to it. The key to reducing stress is to be firm without risking any harm to the dog and to talk to the dog throughout. Well, that’s my opinion! I always talk to dogs when I am grooming them, it also allows you to get everything of your chest!

                      When clipping the poodle it is important to pull the skin taught before clipping an area. This does not need to be done with force and never pull the skin outwards from the body to do this. Simply placing a flat hand on the poodles body and gently pulling the skin away from the area about to be clipped is the best method in my experience.

                      When bathing the poodle keep talking to and being confident with the poodle. I have always found that they hate to get into the bath, but calm down once the water is on them and they become accustomed to the situation. In the case of my own poodle Sophie, she will also start shaking water all over the place at numerous intervals during the experience!

                      It is really important that, despite the fact that you may well end up covered in water and shampoo and numerous other things, you do not shout or shriek at the dog when this happens! Sounds silly, but you would be surprised at how many people do! It is natural for the dog to do this, which means that the dog is relaxed enough to express natural behaviour, you suddenly shout or let out a scream and you could be back at square one.

                      Above anything else, wear old clothes to bath and groom your dog and certainly don’t do it in a rush as this will leave both you and the dog stressed! Take it slow, be calm and gentle, and don’t put yourself in a situation where you will get mad at the dog for making a mess or getting you messy, the dog is behaving normally and shouting will only make the dog want to be groomed less next time!

                      Additional Treatment Needed

                      My poodle has no additional treatment except for shampoo. Sophie is not a show poodle, so she was not given a special certified form of shampoo treatment but was given standard black coat shampoo which is ideal for a house pet poodle. The black shampoo does help the dog to maintain the breed standard as it enriches the coat to maintain its colour and condition.

                      The further additional treatment which can be given is conditioner for show dogs as poodles are not prone to dry skin, but do not have a naturally well conditioned coat. Also a lot of poodles suffer from ear problems, so regular treatment should be given and often the hair should be pulled out of the dog’s ears to prevent further problems.

                      All dogs should also have their nails cut and their teeth brushed regularly. Darker nailed dogs can have their nails shortened with a nail file if this is easier for the owner. Also all dogs can be given treats which are formulated to protect against bad breath and plaque on the teeth as well as medication such as worming.

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                        17.10.2006 10:20
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                        Intelligent breed with a strong will to please and have fun while doing it.

                        When I was in the second grade my parents bought me a party colored (black and white) toy poodle. I named her Boo and she was my best friend and the smartest dog I've ever had the pleasure to own.
                        At eight years old I was by no means a dog training expert of any sort. Through daily playing with my poodle Boo, she learned so many tricks and knew countless commands.
                        I'd ask her if she wants to go for a "bike" and she would climb inside my back-pack and off we'd ride down the street.
                        Because I was in track she would be my racing opponent for practice. I'd say "on your marks (she'd run in a circle and stop), get set (another circle then stops), go!" and we'd both race for the house.
                        I'd also play hide and seek with her. Sometimes I'd hide and peek from my hiding place and watch her searching in all the place I might be.
                        Other times I'd hide her, tell her to stay, and then tell my friends to find my dog.
                        She was a great sport and is hands down one of the smartest breeds I have ever come across.

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                          21.04.2006 19:55
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                          Please don't expect miracles. they are adorable, but do require a bit of patience and so much love

                          Years of moaning and nattering and promising-to-look-after-its finally paid off when me and my sister were promised a toy poodle!! Ok, I admit I wanted a bit of a tough dog, one that everyone would be scared of but we knew was a real softie, but hey, a dogs a dog, right?

                          We went to a breeders for ours, which I suggest doing because you get a full history of the dog and it's parents. There's usually sevearal advertised in the Yeller, but you may not get to see the parents and at the end of the day if the dog was so lovely why are they letting it go? Well, that's my opinion anyway because even if I was moving abroad I WOULD NOT LEAVE MY POODLE. Try the Yellow Pages for reliable breeders in your area.

                          So, I have a toy poodle, and she looks just like the ones you see on cartoons; all fluffy and cute. Her tail is very short and she has quite big, furry ears. A HUGE benefit for many people is that they don't shed, which means allergy sufferers can have one without a problem. For me though, their biggest and greatest quality is their temperament. They have such loving personalites. Yes, personalities. If you don't have a dog you'll probably think I'm mad, but those who do should understand.

                          They are always wagging their little tails and barking (happily and not too much). Toy poodles don't need much walking at all but they certainly love the fresh air. Even a small dog that weighs under 5kg pulls me up the hill, so just a warning that they are tougher than they look.

                          Poodles are incredibly easy to train. Just get a supply of chocolate drops and a little patience and you can teach them all sorts. I've taught mine the following;
                          -sit
                          -shake
                          -stay
                          -play dead
                          -these words; hungry, ball, chew, squeaky, thirsty, walkies, grapes, cheese, and several others.

                          They'll eat pretty much anything, so be careful they don't get fat and/or ill. I feed mine dry dog food, which already has the vital nutrients etc in, Weetabix for breakfast, chocolate drops (from a dog shop, because real chocolate is poisonous to dogs), tiny tiny bits of cheese and half a grape now and then. Apparently, dogs eat 30% more food than they actually need, so don't give in all the time when it's yapping for more food.

                          As with any other dog, I suggest a 'Timeout' area, for when they get a bit loud and no matter what you do won't settle. This may seem a bit strange for a DOG as opposed to a child, but 2 minutes later when they pop out they've calmed down a bit.

                          Now, toys. I have about 20 differnet shop bought toy for Mitzy, most of which she ignores, and I've found she loves a good old mini tennis ball, any socks she finds lying about the place and several chews. You could also try squeaky toys, which can get a bit annoying but they seem to enjoy them.

                          Their fur tends to grow really quickly so to avoid the floating mop look a regular trip to the groomers is necessary. Mitzy costs just over a tenner every couple of months which isn't too bad. I bath mine about once every few weeks, but she's black, so I'm guessing white ones would need them more often, for obvious reasons.

                          When you first leave them alone at home, they'll probably cry, whine and generally kick up a fuss, but, as hard as it is, you must ignore them. Just leave them for 10 minutes or so at first, then go back home and see them again. Eventually the clever little things will trust you and reaise you are coming back. Definitely don't leave them for longer than 5 hours though, as this is cruel and they will get bored and become angry.

                          I suggest typing 'find your perfect dog quiz' in Google, and they will come up with loads of different suggestions for you, based on the answers you give. (Try www.dogbreedinfo.com)

                          Check out the following websites, which may help you decide if this is the right dog for you;
                          www.poodleplayground.com (contains lots of facts, advice and fun stuff)
                          www.geocities.com/heartland/2826/ (the 'Poodles and Children' section will be particularly helpful for those of you who are worried about how they will react to one another)
                          I found that by searching through Google and typing 'Wikipedia Poodle', a really useful website comes up overviewing info such as 'Care', 'History' and 'Health Concerns'.
                          Something else to consider is pet insurance, so try www.compare-pet-insurance.com, which gives details of all the major companies in the UK.

                          Finally, if you're worried about going on holiay and leaving your little baby behind, then My Pet Stop is a 'pet resort and care centre', where you can leave them in a safe environment. You can even sign them up for swimming and hydrotherapy sessions, grooming and training.


                          I'm sure I'll have missed something out so if you want to know anything at all on poodles then I'll try my best to answer them.

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                            15.04.2005 02:28
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                            I was 13 when I got my puppy, I originally wanted a spaniel, but my mum insisted that if were going to have a dog then it was going to be a poodle because she had always wanted one! So after a lot of protests and a few arguments, I agreed to the idea of a poodle… and I’m so glad I did! He’s my baby and I’d be lost without him!


                            I was round at my granddads house one day and my mum had given me a copy of exchange and mart to look at and see if there was any puppies advertised in there, there was, so she phoned up this really nice lady in Bridgenorth who had been breeding poodles for about 40 years, we arranged to go look at the puppies the following Saturday morning.


                            We arrived at the house, and was greeted by 3 standard poodles barking at the gate, we went inside and somehow I just fell in love with these little fluff balls running round my feet, there was about 4 of them to choose from. The choice however was very easily made… the one with the funny wiggly bum walk who kept fussing round my legs. I told mum he was the one we had to get, and my granddad who had come with us picked him up and checked him over and mum paid £275 fro him and that was it, I had my new best pal!


                            The journey home was about an hour, which was hard for the little fella as he was locked in his doggy box and was scared and looking through the bars at me, he had already been carsick so I took him out the box and gave him a cuddle. I put him back until we got home, then we took him in and opened his little doggy door for him to come out and explore… but no he stayed in there scared. However a little coaxing with some doggy toys later and he makes his way out, still nervous and scared but hey when he’s got me to play with he soon gets over that and is as playful as any puppy.


                            After a while we soon realised we were going to have to call him Max as he was (and still is!) completely MAD!!


                            Max has been great, he is the first dog that I actually had a part in training, and yes I managed ok! He can do all the basic stuff, like walking on a lead, sitting and lying down when he is told to and he can even shake paws with you. However his basic discipline is useless! He used to be really naughty and chew everything, I think he still would if he ever had the chance! He hates postmen and is actually quite funny as well as doing the typical attack the post when it comes through the door, he will go to the effort of throwing himself against the car window if he is sitting in it and we drive past a postman! In the car he is generally well behaved, he has his own dog seatbelt, so he can sit in the front and keep who-ever is driving company!!


                            *** Poodles ***

                            Poodles come in 3 sizes. Standard, Miniature and Toy.

                            Standard Poodles are the largest of them all they can grow very large (a bit bigger than a Labrador!) and as with all big dogs they need lots of exercise.

                            Miniature Poodles are the middle size, they can be about as big as a spaniel and they too also need plenty of exercise.

                            Toy poodles are the smallest and in my opinion the best out of all 3! They can be anything from about as big as a Yorkshire terrier to the size of a small spaniel. Max is a toy poodle and he is almost as big as my friends Cavalier King Charles.

                            Poodles also come in a variety of colours including, black, apricot, white and chocolate.


                            *** Grooming ***

                            Poodles require A LOT of grooming. They have coats made of wool and unlike other dogs they don’t moult, their fur is continually growing, so they do need daily brushing to prevent lugs and knots, and a regular trip to the groomers, which can cost anything from £10 up. Alternatively if you feel confident enough, then you can buy a dog grooming kit for around £20, and with most of these you get an introductory video to show you how. I’ve had a go myself and providing you don’t want anything too fancy, then its pretty simple.


                            *** Food ***

                            Depending on the size depends on the amount of food needed. We feed Max in the morning and evening, he has a bowl of dried dog food and gets doggy treats and biscuits as well as a bit of human food every now and again.


                            *** Play ***

                            Max loves to play, poodles are naturally very playful dogs and love to learn as they are also very intelligent. They enjoy a wide variety of toys, Max has his own toy box, so does our other dog and so does my little brother, so our lounge is great!!

                            *** Friends ***

                            Until recently there was only Max and myself, but then in January 2002 we decided to get him a friend, this came in the form of a little Yorkshire terrier puppy, and to be honest I’m sure Max thought it was some kind of joke and we’d bought him a live toy! For the first week they had to be separate, then gradually we introduced them, still making loads of fuss of Max as he is of course “top dog”. Eventually they began to get along and now they are fine and can be happily left alone together. They still have their moments of separation, but that’s now usually because the little one has taken over the playful role and Max likes to rest. Also in January 2003, another new friend in the form of a baby! Right from the moment my little brother came home, Max was great, he loves him to bits and is always fussing over him, if you go into the baby room when we put him to bed, you will find Max lying under the cot until James (baby) has gone to sleep, then he comes back downstairs, until I go to bed then he will either sleep with me or my mum on the end of the bed!



                            Overall poodles are fantastic dogs to have despite what I and many others originally thought, they are playful, very loving and friendly, they adapt well to new situations, they get on very well with children and other dogs. They don’t cost a lot to keep and if you have a small one they only need walking every other day or a short walk everyday, if they have too much exercise they can damage their legs though!


                            To finish this op off I’m going to tell you about my most memorable event with Max (its hard to pick as there so many!)


                            The first Christmas we had Max, we stayed at my aunts house and she had a puppy German Shepard who was about 3 weeks younger than Max, they had never meant before this so we were abit cautious about letting a poodle meet and play with a German Shepard, however the worries should have been the other way round as our little Max was the one who ended up chasing Otto (the German Shep) round the garden and straight across the frozen pond and in and out the house! It was so funny to watch this tidy dot chasing this big dog round! That’s the type of dog Max is though… completely fearless!

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                              09.12.2004 16:39

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                              well, at the moment my mother and myself own a poodle. Since we got him 11 years ago he has always had his own mind. If you push these animals they dont like it.

                              I used to go head to head with him and try to get him to carry on like a normal dog, but due to his intelligence he did not accept this and reacted with a lot of lovely bites. Now he is older i have learned not to go head to head with him, we now have a great relationship.

                              Poodles are amazing dogs that are Very intelligent and highly amusing characters. Once you have had a poodle you will never find another dog like it.

                              These dogs are dogs that i would recommend to anyone who has patience with dogs and have a great love for them as they can be a handful.

                              If you do decide to get a poodle i will give you a few tips that is never think of a poodle as a puppy, as they have the mind of an adult dog even when they look sweet and angelic. Never allow them to sleep in your bed as they take this as a confirmation that they are human (and believe me they need no confirmation on this as they always think they are human anyway) and lastly do not go head to head with them, just enjoy this unique character and trust me you will.

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                              24.10.2003 21:46
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                              • "Grooming is a big job"

                              I was privileged to be owned by a toy poodle for ten years. Well.. at least that was how I'm sure he saw it! I still remember the day I got him. He was such a small fuzzy blob of a pup he could fit into a slipper. He was so small we named him The Pip. Amazing to think that something that small would one day take over the entire house. The first thing you need to know about toy poodles is they are NOT dogs! Toy poodles don't behave like other dogs. Basically you are getting the closest thing to a cat in the doggy family. Toy Poodles think you were invented to take care of their needs. They may learn to "sit" and even deign to do a few tricks, but basically these little guys are NEVER going obey you unless they think it's worth their while. As for sitting staring at you with drooling adoration the way most dogs do? In your dreams! If you want a grovelling fan and ardent admirer go for another dog breed. The American Kennel club sums up the perfect toy poodle character as: "Carrying himself proudly, very active, intelligent, the Poodle has about him an air of distinction and dignity peculiar to himself." Originally all the poodles were working dogs and not pets. Standards were kept as for water birds - hence the name after "pudeln" in German meaning to splash about in water. Miniatures were used for hunting and as truffle hounds and the toys were the artistes to be found in circuses or used in shows as "dancing dogs." Toy poodles are exceptionally cute and exceptionally aware of this fact. My toy poodle was the only dog I ever owned who would actually come over and pose for his photograph to be taken. How the heck he knew what a camera was is beyond my dumb human brain! Maybe he just knew it meant people were paying attention to you and goodness knows he LOVED attention! Just like a cat toy poodles will come and sit in the middle of your newspaper because they are annoyed at you
                              paying more attention to that stupid piece of paper than to them. Just like a cat most toy poodles I have met will climb on furniture. We used to come home and find our little dictator sleeping in the middle of the dining table. Being aware of their short size they take every opportunity to reach your level and are most happy snoozing on tables/counters/handbags/chair backs and your bedroom pillow! So what do you get out of owning (shhh, don't let "them" here the owning word!) a toy poodle? You get a pet that looks like an ornamental soft toy with the personality of ten movie stars condensed into one small fluffy body. They don't just have Class, they have Panache! They are bold, brave and remarkably charming. These little dogs are not your average "lap dog". They basically have the instincts of a terrier and are bright, high-spirited and adventurous. The males are both willing and eager to try their little paws at hunting and fighting. They WILL attack the postman and they WILL be convinced they can fight and beat up the pit bull next door so be aware that trips to the vet to see to war injuries will be probable. Ours totally loathed black dogs (little racist!). He once attacked a rottweiler who retaliated by throwing him around the room like a beachball. We dashed him to the vet -all he had was a bruised shoulder! He also regularly chased the neighbour's cowardly great Dane, which was rather embarrassing. Females are more gentle and sedate. On the plus side unless provoked toy poodles aren't yappy. Why bother? They'd rather snub you than bark at you and usually keep their worst yappy moments for temper tantrums when they aren't getting their own way. Being very smart means they can easily be taught, but getting them to obey you is never easy. If you are weak-willed or unwilling to stand up and take the time to reinforce who is top dog in the family they will walk all over you ? literally!
                              On the minus side these dogs are cheeky and unruly ones do bite. Hardly a life threatening bite, but they really aren't keen on small children and are more a one-person pet than a rollabout fun family pet. Ours was constantly being grabbed up and away from small kids who didn't realise that he could leap and nip noses like a small fuzzy version of Sigourney Weaver's Alien! He never left any damage, but it was tough apologizing to mothers with screaming kiddies. When I was a kid a pawnbroker in town that was guarded by a minute white toy poodle. She sat on the jewellery display counter and eyed everyone up as potential shop-lifters. That little dog was constantly zapping customers who tried to lean over the glass counter to look at stuff on the far shelf. Be warned - of all the colours in the breed spectrum the white ones are the most lethal for biting and also tend to be sickly. For some reason white poodles sometimes suffer from frail health. Maybe that's why they are all so irritable! Otherwise they are tough sturdy little dogs that can live up to 14 years or more. My gra's two poodles both reached 18! Toy Poodles, like all poodles, come in a wide variety of colours. White, champagne/cream, apricot, red, brown, blue, silver and black. The apricot are really lovely. A soft pale peachy orange like a hazy sunset. Red?s are the dark auburn variation and browns are a deep rich chocolate. Blue is a Silvers are born charcoal and gradually this puppy grows out to a pale silvery grey. Pip was the offspring of a dapper silver father and a very loving gentle apricot mother. Like all silvers he started off a charcoal puppy gradually growing paler as he aged into the silvery grey coat of an adult. In the past mixed colour poodles, called parti or harlequin, were frowned on by breeders and you rarely saw them. Parti is a mix of two colour patches/spots and harlequin is a mix of three colours. Horrible to say most breed
                              ers would simply put down these pups. They could be bought as pets, but never shown. Nowadays they are popular as pets and a lthough still no use as show dogs you can find them online from reputable breeders. My mom owned a parti silver medium Poodle. He was a brilliant dog and to think he might have been destroyed simply because he had a white flash on his chest is really appalling. There are breeders now campaigning to get parti-poodles accepted as a show breed. As far as I know partis and harlequins are now shown in some European countries (I think Germany is one) so there is hope! Average height of a Toy Poodle is anything under 10-11 inches. Like all toy breeds, have small litters of sometimes only one or two pups. Basically we have messed with nature and dogs this tiny often have problems giving birth so prices for toy pups are usually pretty high. Some breeders will sell parti and harlequins much cheaper, which is worth bearing in mind. Please make sure you are dealing with a dealer with a good reputation. Getting a really cheap puppy from a dodgy dealer can be a disaster. My one friend bought poodle pup from a "backyard breeder". This little toy poodle was a gem. The sweetest nature and both loving and intelligent. She also turned out to have malnutrition and defects from bad breeding and was a sickly little doggy her whole life. Enduring many trips to vets and a lot of discomfort which she bore heroically. Grooming: Poodles are high maintenance. Their woolly coats don't shed like most other breeds of dog so you won't find hair everywhere, but they do need regular grooming and clipping. We used to clip our poodle ourselves using a cheap pair of men's hair clippers. Be careful though. Poodles, being intelligent, are self-aware. When a friend once clipped her poodle badly and left him looking like a lawnmower victim he hid under the bed for a whole day. Many pet owners simply keep their poodles trimmed
                              to a sensible length rather than going for the more traditional, and rather daft-looking, show cuts. Care: Poodles need the same basic food, water and care as any other small breed of dog. Poodles aren't fussy eaters unless you spoil them. Our one used to always save a bit of his dinner for breakfast so we never actually had to give him anything in the morning. He loved chicken and would not eat vegetables no matter how you tried to camouflage them. Otherwise he was a no fuss eater. They like company, but they usually prefer to be with humans than other dogs. Toy poodles usually get along fine with cats but I'd be careful with rodents and small birds. Our poodle had hunter instincts and was forever trying to catch the pigeons in the back yard. He also viewed a friend's son's hamster with alarming interest. Of course my gran's toy poodle used to hide under the couch when my cousin brought her rabbit over, so you never can tell how other pets will view each other. Better to always be careful introducing pets to each other when there is a big difference in size.

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                                30.01.2001 15:36
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                                ***** Before we go any further, I would like to clarify my reasons for presenting the opinion in the following manner. It is the first time I have attempted to use surrealism to convey my opinion on something, and I feel it suits the subject matter somewhat. When considering the following op, try to read between the lines, and read it as the opinioned artform that it was intended to be. Does it not make a nice change from standard reviews? In future, expect to see Mush ops in the form of Mime, Minimalism and Music. And ask yourself, before bandying around a poor rating, would you SU Dali or Magritte? Oh go on then...see if I care***** Ever wondered quite why poodles look so...’different’?? As Official Government representative to Dooyoo (for this brief moment in time anyhow) I can reveal the horrific truth; POODLES ARE ALIENS, SET TO TAKE OVER THE WORLD! Scientific research using the most powerful telescopes, sophisticated tracking equipment and a fair whack of imagination has uncovered that Poodles are in fact hyper intelligent aliens from the Planet Dargaz III, which is rather a long way away. The aliens discovered that dogs are human’s closest animal associates, so took on the canine form as closely as possible, before coming to earth in their hairdryer shaped craft. They didn’t get it quite right, hence the obscure appearance of a scrawny hound with an odd haircut and odder demeanor. Alien Poodle research was found to be slightly flawed when they realised that dogs are not on the same level as humans – their activities confined to barking, running, fetching, mooching and general ‘doggie’ activities. Nonetheless they keep their form and observe our activities, disguised all the while as a randomly curly-haired ‘yapper type’ dog. Poodles are, of course, simply biding their time before the ‘big push’. Yes,
                                readers, Poodles are going to TAKE OVER THE WORLD with the aid of their minions, who are none other than... old ladies with blue rinses! No-one knows how the evil hounds and their elderly assistants will perform their terran conquest, but indications are that it may well involve horrors such as obscure knitted garments, cling film wrapped cakes containing dates, and doilies. What can you do to help avert this impending disaster? All that the officials can recommend is that you do the following: When you see a poodle, run up and point at it shouting ‘I KNOW THE TRUTH, EVIL HOUND CHARLATAN!!! BEGONE TO THE HATEFUL PLACE FROM WHENCE YOU CAME!!!’. Continue this for, oh, at least 10 minutes. Have faith and courage in your convictions, even when the government officials in white coats take you away for your due reward. Poodles...together we can crack them. ***UPDATE*** Sources have revealed that Poodles have a new minion in their bid to take over the world - Stick Insects! I would arm yourself with the knowledge of the insidious insectile menace that can be located in the Stick Insect op by 'Muffin_the_Mule'. I am now of the suspicion that old ladies with blue rinses are actually large vehicles driven by Stick Insects... It is suggested that you now avoid anything that looks like a stick. Or an old lady. May God guide your hand in repelling the alien menace. Cheers Mx - Press VU...ready...set...now! -

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