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      01.01.2012 22:45
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      The American Hairless Terrier is a fairly new breed.

      American Hairless Terrier

      I have had my boy for almost two years and wouldn't be without him, he is a shy, lovable pooch who has boundless energy but is also happy to sleep on a lap all day.

      Origin

      The American Hairless Terrier originates from the coated American Rat Terrier. In 1972 a single female completely hairless Rat Terrier was born in Louisiana. It wasn't until 10 years later in 1981 that the first hairless litter was born to the original hairless female.

      Description

      American Hairless Terriers are muscular, smooth, sleek and energetic they have a deep chest and strong shoulders, powerful legs and a strong neck. They have big bat like ears that are carried erect when the dog is alert and full length thin tails.

      The hairless terrier is completely bald they do not have tufts of fur anywhere on their bodies; they do however have normal whiskers and eye brows. They come in a variety of colours which include; white, pink, black, brown, blue, tan and sable and can come in solid colours which can darken with sun exposure.

      The American Hairless Terrier is a small to medium sized terrier that stands at approximately 7-17 inches at the shoulder and weighs 5-16 pounds.

      The life expectancy of this breed is 14-16 years.

      Temperament

      American Hairless terriers make great companions as they are so loving. They originate from working dogs so they are energetic, intelligent and alert. Like all terrier breeds these dogs have a lively, feisty and fearless nature which makes them excellent watch dogs. As with all terriers these dogs need out door exercise and excel at agility.

      These dogs are good with children especially if they are brought up with them.

      Grooming

      The biggest issue with this breed is preventing sun burn by using sun screen or wearing a light cotton T-shirt and keeping them warm in cold weather.

      As they have no fur so there are no flea problems and no need to brush or clip these dogs but they do need to bathed, moisturised and their nails clipped regally.

      Hypoallergenic

      This breed is great for people who like me have allergies to dog fur, however if you have allergies to dander or dog saliva an allergy test is recommended before a dog is purchased.

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        20.09.2010 11:11
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        Not necessarily a dog for beginners, but a true companion and friend.

        The first thing I should say is that Wheaten Terriers are not good dogs for beginners, getting a Wheaten as your first dog would be like getting one of those jet-powered things Richard Hammond crashed as your first car. Don't say you weren't warned!

        Now that I've put you off, I'll spend the rest of the review telling you just how wonderful they are.

        Appearance:

        Wheatens are a medium sized dog, similar in form to the Airedale or the Fox Terrier but a bit stockier and less fleet of foot! Their most distinctive characteristic is their blonde wavy fur which looks lovely after a grooming session but awful after they've rolled in mud and dragged themselves backwards through several hedges.

        I should point out, the dooyoo image is not a Wheaten Terrier!

        Behaviour:

        Soft Coated Wheaten Terriers were originally bred in Ireland to be all-purpose farm dogs. So while they have some of the characteristics that are common in terriers, they also have some different traits so they aren't typical terriers. They have hunting instincts, herding instincts, guarding instincts and retrieving instincts but aren't exactly expert at any of these things. The phrase 'Jack of all trades, master of none' springs to mind.

        Wheatens are unrelentingly happy and optimistic dogs, I think this has a lot to do with their intelligence levels, which are sadly pretty low, but then they do say ignorance is bliss! Your Wheaten will probably never learn how to operate door handles or that the dogs on the TV can't come out and play, but he'll always greet you like you're returning home after a year long expedition to the south pole and insist on sitting as close as physically possible to you on the sofa. My Wheaten, despite his 27kg bulk seems to think he's a lapdog and that I should have no problem spending the evening pinned under him!

        Wheatens are trainable, but I've found it hard to get beyond the basics. Mine can sit, lie down, roll over (but only in one direction) and most of the time comes when called unless there's something really really interesting distracting him.

        Wheaten's seem to be very sociable with other dogs, they view every other dog as a potential friend but do get a bit over excited at times. I can't comment on how they get on with cats, most terriers seem to view them as prey but my Wheaten is terrified of them! As with other terriers they generally should be kept away from rodents and other small animals as part of what they were bred for was to keep farms free of rats and other vermin so they will want to hunt and catch them.

        Care requirements:

        Wheatens are pretty high energy dogs and need a lot of exercise to keep them happy and calm. Having the run of a garden all day is great for them but not enough, they need a proper walk as well of at least an hour a day, preferably with some off lead time to play fetch and have a good sniff of the surroundings. Your Wheaten's walk will be the highlight of his day and the joyful reaction when he sees the lead is one of the nicest things about owning one. They do tend to pull though, and as they are surprisingly strong for their size you will either have to be very very thorough with lead training or get a halti in order to not be dragged along like a spare part. I got a halti.

        Wheaten's don't shed their fur like most dogs, instead it keeps growing and they lose a few a day in a similar way to human hair. This means your Wheaten will need regular brushing by you in order to stop the fur tangling and matting and also trips to a groomer every couple of months for a shampoo and a trim

        Hypoallergenic?l:

        You may have heard that Wheaten's are good dogs for people with allergies or asthma, well I have both of these and happily live with my Wheaten with no problems. However, there's no guarantees that this would be the same for everybody, different people are allergic to different allergens from dogs and some might be affected by the dust that the dog carries in his shaggy fur.

        The best way to find out if your allergies would be affected by a Wheaten is to find somebody who owns one and spend a bit of time around them, not just when they are freshly groomed but when they're due a haircut and have just come in from a walk dragging half the countryside back in with them!



        So, Wheaten Terriers are loving, good natured, friendly, messy, stupid, hilarious, cute and make wonderful companions and friends. My Wheaten has wonderful instincts for sensing when a human is upset or ill and has really helped me through some tough times in his role as therapy dog. However, they are hard work and take up a fair bit of your time and energy, these are not low maintenance dogs!

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          28.01.2010 15:57
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          Terrific Terriers!

          We got our terrier Pippa from the local dogs home as a 8 week old puppy 11 years ago- sadly we lost her 2 weeks ago,but the whole of her life she was a lively,devoted dog. A breed that I would recommend without hesitation.
          If terriers have one fault, its that they like to dig! (Aftyer all they are were bred originally to dig out rats etc), so if you have a nice garden then prepare to have a few holes dug for you! Pippa spent ages in the garden just digging and proudly presented us with her treasures- a bit of rope, an old toy gun- the list is endless! As a breed they vare easily trained so this trait was easy to overcome.
          We had Pippa when my daughter was 18moths old and I was careful not to leave them together. There was never any trouble and she became a wonderful family pet. I have read that they tend to have one owner but this didnt happen with us- she loved/obeyed us all equally. As with any dog- its behaviour is generally down to the owners.
          I disagree with the previous reviewer in that she loved long walks,a nd liked nothing better than a mammoth walk round our local park and lakes chasing squirrels! Another word of warning- terriers are seriously fast little runners!
          If you are considering a terrier make sure that you purcahse the correct bowls etc to make your and the dogs life easier. Narrow bowls are easier for them to eat/drink from (and they do love to eat if you let em!) as they have pointed snouts.
          What else can I say? If you want a loyal faithful pet then you cant go wrong with a terrier,

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          26.01.2010 18:42
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          A lovely dog, would suit anyone

          I have a Border Terrier called Bobby and got him from the dog's home nearly 3 years ago, we have been told he was between 5 and 7 when we got him which makes him 8 to 10 now and he really is of a lovely nature.

          Bobby was very quiet when we first got him and having never had a Border Terrier before we were going out on a limb a little bit but have never regretted it since. After settling in quickly Bobby became a very lively and loving member of the family and it really does make you wonder why anyone would want to give him up but their loss was our gain. One of Bobby's ribs sticks out and the vet think he was kicked, he also has the tip of one of his ears missing so his life before living with us can't of been too nice, however how quickly Bobby trusted us was amazing and he has never stopped being the perfect little dog.

          The breed are said to be very good natured and this is very true, Bobby is great with everyone and takes to new people very quickly which is surprising considering his past. When talking to other Border Terrier owners they also say was a laid back breed it is and he really is happy just lying about all day and doesn't mind being left home alone but if he knows someone's in the house he will always go and look for the as he loves attention.

          If you're looking for a small to medium sized dog then I would definately recommend a Border Terrier, they are just the right size and love long walks but also like short walks and they don't need to be exercised excessively, I know Bobby definately prefers to stay in sometimes!

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          26.03.2009 12:17
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          This pet is a barn dog that kills pests

          Norfolk Terrier

          The Norfolk Terrier, the smallest terrier is a happy, spirited and active beast. Fearless and affectionate by nature, it wilts without human touch. Balls are its favourite playthings and mutual love exists between the Norfolk Terrier and children. They are self-confident and undemanding but bark when they are bored. These are basically barn dogs which kill rats and pests.
          Both, the Norfolk and the Norwich Terrier were initially seen as one breed. It was later differentiated by the English and the folded ears of the Norfolk Terrier were its distinguishing factor.

          Appearance
          Size: The height of the Norfolk Terrier is 10-11" and it weighs about 5 kg.
          Colour: It can be red, black or brown.
          Coating: Its undercoat is soft but the outer coat is wiry and rough.
          Eyes: The eyes of the Norfolk Terrier are usually dark and communicative.
          Ears: Its hanging ears fall over its cheeks.
          Although it legs are very short, the Norfolk Terrier has a sturdy, strong and balanced bone and body structure and is therefore, very agile.

          Litter
          A Norfolk Terrier gives birth to 2 puppies at a time. The demand of the free Norfolk Terrier pups are more than the supply at all times because it is a very popular household pet.

          Preferred Environment
          It is quite energetic and active indoors but needs to be exercised regularly outdoors. They can be trained easily.

          Lifespan
          Its average lifespan in 12-16 years but a healthy Norfolk Terrier is known to survive for 2 decades.

          This article has originally been authored by me and appeared on the site:http://www.freepuppiessale.com

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            09.01.2009 21:42
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            Lovely dogs

            I have a bedlington terrier who is now almost 4 years old and is a very friendly dog.
            Bedlingtons, if you haven't already guessed, belong to the terrier group of dogs. The dogs/bitches are well tempered and are friendly when around children, babies, adults and other pets. Although I would not recommend bringing a cat into the household after getting the Bedlington/s. If you have a cat before you get the dog/bitch, the Bedlington/s will adjust to it and won't mind the cat being around.
            Bedlington temperaments can vary but will always be in the friendly category. This breed requires lots of attention when they are puppies and must have an owner who can train them well. Sometimes your Bedlington/s will not always want to be played with; sometimes they just like to curl up in a ball and sleep. Usually this happens in the morning so they can sleep off their breakfast.
            I would definitely recommend getting a Bedlington terrier as they are very adventurous, loving and a great companion to have around.
            Bedlingtons cost around £400 ($611.40) to £600 ($917.40) depending on where you get it/them from.
            Enjoy or Bedders (Bedlington)!!!

            P.S Make sure you only feed your dog(s)/bitch(es) twice a day!!

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            31.10.2008 14:01

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            Wonderful breed of dog

            Have a gorgeous Jack Russell pup.. he's funny, full of character and perfect for a pet. He's charming, pretty and loyal. Bit cheeky, but that just adds to his character. Also have two West Highland terriers.. they're very loyal, quiet and charming dogs. Definitely pet material, good with children and perfect for a family home. They are little, and easy to trip over (!), but they are also amazing pets to have. i would certainly reccomend them to people who enjoy walks, as they are energetic and need to be walked daily. Lovely lap dogs, too, so would also reccomend the more quiet ones to the older generations, too. They're my favorite breeds of dogs, and I'd have as many of them as I could if my partner would let me! They are absolutely gorgeous dogs, and very highly reccomended. I think they're definitely worth a try! Best of luck x

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            19.12.2003 19:31
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            Please skip this first bit to be able to read the review with capital letters intact. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a
            . a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. I have a little friend and work mate who I know I could always trust to cheer me up when I'm down, be on my side when every one else is against me, give me a big welcome when I haven't seen him for all of half an hour and through all this. asks very little of me. My friends name is Jack and he's a tri coloured Jack Russell Terrier. Now a lot of people are very weary of Jack Russell's simple because they seem to have a bad press, which is not really warranted as with almost all dogs they are as trust worthy as the people who handle them. They get their name from Reverend John Russell who as well as being a clergyman was also very keen on Fox hunting and breeding dogs for the sport he was also one of the founder members of the Kennel Club. The grand daddy of the Jack Russell was called Trump who John Russell bought from a milkman. The Jack Russell's of today resemble the then Fox Terrier and is one of the few breeds that have the name of a real person who was associated with them. Although originally breed to hunt foxes the jack Russell is often used to hunt most burrowing animals and have for a long time been associated with ratting. They have a lovely loyal, active, happy and intelligent character and do make lovely pets when trained properly and being so active some people think they need special handling to stop them from being destructive. Not true, one of the things a Jack Russell loves to do is chew; I buy those rawhide sticks for Jack and they keep him occupied for hours. Exercise is very important and although they are small dogs, they do require almost as much exercise as a large one to keep them happy and because of their hunting instinct they are rather tempted to chase and even kill other small anima
            ls but this can be trained out of them with the right owner. The ideal Jack Russell should be approximately 14 inches at the withers and have a thick skin and a thick dense coat, they are usually white with black or tan markings and are quite a sturdy build. They do make excellent pets as long as the owners are suitable, if not handled properly they can become quite destructive and difficult and as with all dogs a lot of research should first be done before acquiring one to be sure they are the dog for you. I have found Jack to be a lovely little friend and I even take him to work with me, as a carer I look after elderly people and many of them love animals and have often kept them their selves but old age has made it impossible to still keep them as many have mobility problems and so could not exercise them sufficiently. Jack always comes to work with me and puts up with a lot of petting and fussing. I trust Jack completely and know his limitations, I know if he's had enough he'll walk away and sometimes give just a little grumble at the most. My charges love to see him; in fact I often say I think they would be happy if Jack came by his self as I often feel in the way. The only problem I find is they do tend rather to spoil him and I'm always finding dog biscuits behind their cushions where he hides them before I see what he's got and take it away from him, He's got quite a little tummy on him. I would recommend a Jack Russell to a future owner as long as they can be understanding of their needs, which basically are plenty of exercise, a firm but kind and understanding hand and something to keep them occupied, this can simply be something to chew. There is one thing you might like to know if you're a keen gardener and that is they often love to dig holes in the earth, In Jacks case to hide all the biscuit he sneaks by me. A few more things to consider before owning one of these dogs are; the
            y moat a lot and as they are mainly white every hair shows up but this can be minimalised by regular grooming. They like to bark; although this makes them good housedogs it can be annoying at times. Vet bills can be expensive and active dogs can sometimes have mishaps. Once my son and his friends took Jack fishing and he jumped up suddenly when saw the fish wriggle on the hook and grabbed it, thus he needed the vet and a minor operation to get the fishhook out of his mouth. Lastly of course " A dog is for life and not just for Christmas" before going out and buying a pet please make sure you research the breed and think very carefully before buying. Animals become insecure just like children do if they are abandoned and passed from pillar to post. It's just not fair. Thanks for reading. Kim and Jack.

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              20.08.2003 07:36
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              Somehow I have recently aquired my mums dog 'Taz'. A smooth haired fox terrier. We have looked after the dog on a couple of occasions because my mother finds him hard to control, mainly because they work and he is left a lot in his kennel, so I took over care of the dog, she couldn't understand why he kept digging the garden up or getting the washing off the line, but I could. We have our own dog ' Holly' a SBT which he gets on great with, he loves company and follows my children around like a lost lamb, suddenly this little dog became a lovable rogue and part of the family (meaning he fights for a space on my bed along with Holly, my husband amd me). He is still a menace, but because I have one very well trained dog I think he starting to learn a few tricks from her, he knows 'sit' which may not seem a lot but is a great achievement considering his previous behaviour, given time and love I believe he will calm down and learn to be the dog I know he can be given the right training. His maintainance is as exspensive and time consuming as you make it, his insurance is approx £7 per month, he likes a lot of exercise, but doean't eat us out of house and home, a hanfull of winalot complete in the morning and a tin of pedegree chum in the evening and he's a happy chappie. Best of all he even gets on with my cat!

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                29.07.2002 23:49
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                I bought my Westie from a breeder who had finished with her. £100 for something you have no use for is quite good business, but it was their loss. She had never known what it was like to be inside a home. The first thing she did was wee everywhere which was quite a shock, as I didn't know that breeding dogs weren't house-trained. I let out a shriek, which just made her wee more - but the accidents only happened for a week or so. She was a quick learner considering that she had a four year habit to break. One of the first things we noticed about her was the smile. Yes, a real cheesy grin, which she still does either when she's done something wrong (which isn't often), or when she's pleased to see us. We named her Sheri (after Teddy Sheringham), another change for her - she was originally Patsy - but she didn't seem too confused. I think she was just grateful to have a proper home and a few odd luxuries. She has only ever shown a bad temper on two occasions, both times with a baby which was worrying, although she only growled, as if in warning. She does seem to be unsure of anything smaller than her. I collect soft toys, and my daughter called out to me to look in the back garden as it was "like a grave-yard". Sheri had removed as many soft toys as she could from the house and deposited them outside. I gave up keeping them on the back of the settee after that because she probably wondered why they were allowed, and she wasn't. We wouldn't be without her now. She is affectionate, playful, and surprisingly, a very quiet dog. Although she does bark at times now, it was actually some 3 months before we heard her bark for the first time. We wondered if she actually could! Healthwise we have had no problems either - and I hope I'm not tempting fate here. I would recommend a Westie to anyone. They are friendly and though they are only small, they ha
                ve their own characters - and it's not many small dogs that a man can feel comfortable about walking! Ours though, is actually quite lazy. She loves to go out for "a walk", even though on more than one occasion, it's been more of "a carry". When we want to encourage her to do anything, we just say the word "treat", and she comes running. Im still not sure though if she is a stubborn dog, or if she has cottoned on to the fact that if she needs coaxing, there is often the magic word "treat" at the end of it. It wouldn't surprise me. At the end of the day, I think we're hers, rather than the other way round.

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                  18.07.2002 15:25
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                  Our family have had Scottish Terriers on and off for three generations (possibly even longer), so when I think dog, I think Scottie. These stubborn little dogs are packed full of so much character and attitude that they could probably steam-roller a fresh-faced owner without much knowledge of the breed. If you can handle these awkward animals, then the chances are that you'll be hooked for life - my parents have only ever had Scotties, Hamish being our current canine, and have no intention of ever getting any other breed of dog. Scotties are small but stocky dogs whose main features include pointy ears, enormous eyebrows (they say that dogs look like their owners - that'd be Hamish's eyebrows that my Dad has then!), a long square snout, sporting a rather fine beard (even the ladies and babies), thick neck, a tail that can point directly upwards and a kilt. Well, not a kilt exactly, more-like wiry, black fur that hangs down like a skirt, which has acquired Hamish the title of 'Hoverdog' according to one of my friends. If this still doesn't help you place these pointy little pets, then think of a bottle of Black and White Whisky - the Scottie is the black one. Although not all Scotties are black, they also come in wheaten and brindle. (Wheaten is a whitish-creamy colour, and brindle is a browny-reddish colour.) The breed's characteristics can be traced back to the Old Scotch Terrier whose other descendants include the Dandie Dinmont, Cairn and West Highland Terriers (sometimes mistaken as 'white' Scotties), although their precise origins are unclear. They were originally bred to catch vermin and were perfect for the job because of their strong jaws, stocky, powerful body and independence of thought. (When he is half-way down a hole, a Scottie does not have the opportunity to ask permission of his master before killing a rat or badger etc). In fact it is this independence of thought that makes own
                  ing a Scottie such a challenge, and training one such a headache. Even when those beautiful almond eyes are looking up at you balefully, the worst thing you can do is give in to them, because they will then view you as a push over! The problem is that they are such a clever breed that you might have to try and stop yourself laughing before disciplining them. One particular occasion that springs to mind was when my parents first visited my grandparents after acquiring their first Scottie, Bruce. My grandparents had a more mature Scot called Rory who viewed this young upstart with obvious distain. On the first night staying there, Bruce peed in the kitchen and my Dad had to tell him off. The next morning my Dad went into the kitchen, fully expecting to have to discipline young Bruce, only to find that there was nothing on the floor - however, Rory's drinking water was yellow! They are also one of the few breeds of dog that will really argue with you. One of my grandparent's dogs used to steal my Gran's duster when she was cleaning. She would tell him off, and he would growl, she would say something else, he would growl - I don't think either of them ever managed to get the last word! Although we have always have had Scotties, they are not necessarily the best breed to have with young children. They are a very proud breed who are not the most patient dogs. When my sister was little she used to pull Bruce's tail (by this time he was a reasonably mature gent, grumpily getting used to a baby as the new centre of attention), and she also used to put her fingers in his ears. To say that Bruce was unimpressed would be an understatement, but he tolerated it - until one day when she did both. As far as he was concerned he had endured enough degradation from this 'thing' - so he snapped. Unfortunately as he turned his head to snap, (her second warning) my sister's cheek came in contact with his teeth. Now, my sis
                  ter will freely admit that this was her own fault, and it must also be realised that if Bruce had wanted to do any real damage to my sister he could have hurt her much more. He was simply letting her know, after previously growling a first warning, that this was going just too far. The problem is that to own a Scottie, your children have to be willing to listen to what the dog has to say - my sister started listening a lot harder after that day! At the same time though, we had a lovely little Scottie called Angus when I was little who put up with a lot from me. Apparently I used to walk around the house with Angus (the puppy) held by the neck under one arm. He never complained, but just put up with this strange child-thing manhandling him. Unfortunately every Scot has their limits; when my Mum used to tie him up outside the school she didn't realise that some of the older children bullied him by pretending to kick him. The poor dog never really liked children after that and was definitely more bad-tempered around them. One of the characteristics that I love about Scotties is that they will do what they want to do and not what you want them to. They will tell you to go away with a withering look if they do not want to be petted or played with, and they don't tell you politely either. Here's a little example: when I was little we went to a country fair and decided to enter Angus in a race. Strangely for a Scottie, he ran everywhere, and we thought he was bound to win. The race started, Angus walked two steps. Stopped. Turned around and walked back. My Dad gave him a quick shove, to which he looked around giving my Dad a look of confusion and annoyance and ran straight back to us. He had no intention of taking part! Angus was a truly exceptional Scottie in that he really enjoyed walking and would run everywhere. They are normally absolutely fine until they are a couple of years old when they just put the brakes on.
                  We have found that the easiest way to exercise them is off the lead in fields or along bridleways. I think its all down to them realising that being on a lead is being under your control rather than being under their own. When walking along roads you do need to exercise them on the lead because bicycles or cats often seem to trigger that dormant hunter in them and you might be left wondering where your dog is. This does also mean that you have to be pretty strong to walk one of these little lads because that thick neck seems to be able to withstand a lot of straining - whether its you pulling them along or them trying to chase something with you attached. Our latest little lad also tends to have a little habit of swearing under his breath in dog at other, generally, much bigger dogs. I don't know why he seems to want to pick a fight with Labradors and Collies, when he is normally a pretty sociable dog who enjoys a good sniff and tail shudder like any other dog. They are also a very vocal breed who very keenly defend their property -I read somewhere that they are the third best dog at doing this because their loud, deep bark suggests a much bigger dog. (Hamish has a habit of throwing himself against our front door which adds to this.) If he is sitting by our garden gate and someone walks past then he will bark loudly while spinning insanely - strangely most of them have seemed to do that - don't ask me why! All of this makes them sound a very anti-social breed, but they are actually very affectionate. Hamish walks very slowly and deliberately past you with a toy in his mouth which means that he wants you to come and play. He will come up to you and ask for affection - he loves a good ear tug which will produce the strangest arroouggh noise from him. You can also get him to make this noise by giving him a good rough back scrub, which is almost as good as a bush. (Rubbing his back against a bush is Hamish heaven!)
                  Due to over-breeding, pedigree dogs often seem to suffer from certain complaints. The main problem we have had with our dogs is that they sometimes suffer from eczema. This is normally cleared up by giving them cod liver oil mixed in with their meal. Hamish loves this as it adds a hit of flavour to his dry meal. (We give him dry meal because it is gentler on the stomach and is good for the teeth.) Scotties are an acquired taste, but what makes them so wonderful is their strong personalities. Every one of ours has had something that made them unmistakably Rory, Bruce, Angus, Ricki, Hamish or even Monty. In the few days that we knew Monty (Hamish's brother) we saw a cocky little lad who tried to pull a trowel bigger than him across the garden with surprising success, even though he was dying at the time. They are intelligent, independent and alert animals who have provided our family with hours of enjoyment. If you are looking for a challenging canine then one of my pointy little friends would be perfect. Jill Murphy asked me to write about one of my favourite things to help her celebrate her fourth anniversary of cancer-free living and to remind ourselves of all the nice things in the world. It takes more muscles to make a frown than a smile you know. If you'd like to join in, whether you've only just joined dooyoo, or you've been here ages, you're more than welcome. Just write about one of YOUR favourite things, make your title "A Favourite Thing: [your choice]" and include this paragraph at the foot of your opinion. And post before Friday, 9th August.

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                    16.07.2002 05:47
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                    • "The price has doubled since we bought this dog!"

                    They were the beautiful people of the dog show world, his ancestors. A few of them champion winners, and it proudly beamed on his pedigree in black and white: ch: So-And-So-Of-Such-A-Place. The names escape me. Chico could have been a show dog too; he had a large, well shaped body, bright eyes, perky ears and lovely silken bronze and black hair. Well it was after he had a bath. The only thing that held him back from this was his over-shot bottom jaw. It made his bottom teeth protrude slightly from his mouth in a little smile. What wasn?t good for the dog show circuit was good enough for me. Chico was my dog and he was with me through all my time as a kid, right through to early adulthood. He was what you might call a mutt and a half. He was quite an anticipated affair. It was 1985 and I had just turned three-years-old. There was a lot of talk about getting a puppy. My Mum said to me, "Are we getting a puppy??. I must have squealed yes. Then both Mum and I were going ?woof, woof, woof?. You do these things as a kid and then you never forget (only to be mortified in the pubescent years to come). It was quite a drive out to the kennel where we got him. We, my parents, my aunt and myself, were ushered into a dark little hut and shown a bundle of little black Yorkshire Terrier puppies gamboling around in their pen. "What one do you want?" I was asked. I pointed to a black blur dashing off into the corner. Then my aunt said, "What about that one there sitting looking at us?" And that was that. He was taken from the pen and handed to us, my parents parting with £150. We took him home. Chic The Wick had landed. As a puppy, Chico would be smuggled into places where he wasn?t supposed to go, thanks to his small size and large coat pockets. One time, my Dad took him into the local shopping centre with us, his tiny black and tan head poking out and staring at what was going on. My whole family, including extended fa
                    mily members et al, soon fell in love with him. Other than being pampered rotten, he had a teddy bear, Garfield style, which he loved. I also enjoyed chasing him. He did not. As he got older, the personality developed. This was one clever mutt and he had a mind of his own. One of his favourite past times was running away. Once, at the age of four or so, I remember a man handing him over the fence to me. Big armful of fur and who knows what else he had stuck in it at the time! Another time, he frightened my step-dad (a large man of 6 feet two inches in height) by running off during a walk. My step-dad was alone. He thought the end was nigh when he got home to my mother. In true Chico fashion, the smart alec came trotting back as if nothing had happened. Chicos first birthday approached. He was smuggled into a friends flat where animals weren?t allowed and had a birthday party. I?ve never known a dog to have had such a good cake since. As time went on, he did the normal doggy things as well as running off. He did have a number of run-ins with my Mum for leaving little presents and what not, but other than that, we all rolled along quite happily. Chico had turned into quite a nervous dog as he got older. I would take him for a walk in the local park and he?d drag along at the end of the lead wanting to go home. He also hated loud noises. At the age of five, it came to a head and he suffered a fit. My Dad rushed the shaking pile of fur off to the vet, whilst my aunt was left to babysit my brother and I. We were wondering if he?d come back alive. He did, but still continued suffering the fits, getting carted off to the vets each time. In the end, the vet put him on tablets to calm him down and stop the fits. Chico didn?t like that. However, the problem was solved by hiding his pills in bits of cheese and sausage. It put the dog in a good mood. He also became more playful and started to enjoy savaging old cuddly toys, otherwise known as his ?baby?. The baby was a source of great amusement. If you hid it, he?d go nuts. If you held on to it, he?d almost drag you across the room. If you held it over his head, your arms would be scratched to ribbons. This baby went everywhere he went. Chico slept on my bed (which I liked if I felt scared at night). Of course, he?d bring his baby with him. As well as taking up a shocking amount of room for such a small dog, he?d sit comfortably on the duvet and lick his baby. At night, trying to sleep, all you would hear was ?Shlurp, shlurp, shlurp.? Moving my foot under him would guarantee a noisy GRRRRRRR. If I took the toy off him and threw it away, he?d walk across the bed, jump off, thump on the floor and start sniffing. Dogs in general are quite noisy sniffers. Chico would snuffle away until he?d find the baby, pick it up, jump back on the bed, pinch my comfy spots and it would start again. I?d lie in defeat with a noisy ?Shlurp, shlurp, shlurp?, whiling the dark night away. Chico also became the Daddy of real babies too. We got another Yorkie, a bitch called Candy. In July 1988, she produced a bundle of little darlings. Sadly one died, but the rest grew to be quite healthy. Two of them were taken on by my aunt and Gran. My aunt took Kerry, who grew into a fat pile of curly hair and big lugs. She too inherited Chicos overshot jaw and smiles too. My Gran took Shandy, but he ended up living with my other aunt due to his over-zealous nature. He used to leap the fence and my Gran would end up running after him down the street. A chip off the old block, really. Kerry seems to have taken on part of her Dads stubborn nature. She once chase off an Alsation about six times her size. Kerry and Shandy are still going and have just reached the grand old age of 14. Candy went on to produce two more litters. The last litter were quite weak. There were only three, with one dying. Once it was time to sell that litter, Candy went too. My Gran took on another pup, a t
                    imid little pile of fur called Trixie, who would be tormented by Shandy until he was shown the door. Candy went to live with my great-grandparents and then my aunts father-in-law after my great-granpa died. Unfortunately she was put down two years ago because she developed cancer. Candy wasn?t the only pal Chico had. A few years after Candy went to stay with my great-grandparents, we acquired Misty. She didn?t settle in very well and my aunt took her to stay with Kerry until she calmed down. She was only meant to be there a little while, but she?s still there to this day. Misty settled well with Kerry and turned into a quirky dog with dubious intelligence. We attempted to breed her with Chico when he turned 9, but by then he was a bit of an old fella and couldn?t quite make it. Ahem. With Misty happily residing elsewhere, Chico happily returned to the life of the solo male hound, with a big supply of food, love and of course, his Baby. The ?Shlurping? went on as usual, even though we upped everything and moved to Dumfries. There were interruptions to it though as he took on the life as a country dog. By now, he?d abandoned his running away, instead happily going for walks around the farm with no lead. He enjoyed chasing off the wild cats who lived there. One time he was chasing a suspect character out of the garden, when he tripped over a brick and went somersaulting in the air. I feared the worst and raced to pick up what I thought would be the sorry remains of my dog. Chico stood back up on landing and continued to chase the cat. I breathed I sigh of relief. By time we moved to Dumfries, it was 1995 and Chico was getting on at the age of ten. He lived quite a happy life with his own routine, setting the rules of the house like you do. He had firmly made his mark. But one day, all changed. Christmas 1995. Chico was in for a shock, just like my seven-year-old brother. After Chicos failed attempts to breed with Misty, the job was s
                    uccessfully done by his son, Shandy. Out of the litter of four pups came Opra. She came into our house and hearts on Christmas day as my brothers surprise present. She was fat, full of character and had a waggy tail (It was illegal when Opra was born to dock dog tails). Chico was aghast! Who on earth was this little terror coming into upset the balance of his life (and power). He spent Christmas day under my bed in huff, coming out for noone. Opra settled in quickly and Chico emerged from under the bed, albeit in a stinker of a mood. Opra seemed to sense there was the opportunity for a laugh here. She waited until the right moment. One day, Chico sauntered from the back garden and by the couch where I was sitting with the pup. Opra suddenly leapt off the couch and landed on Chicos back. The bronze headed one was not amused. From there on though, it seemed Pop (as she is nicknamed) broke the ice with Chico. Opra grew into a reasonably skinny dog, complete with a slurping tongue and the intelligence of Odie from Garfield. Chico seemed to accept her and they did get on rather well, except for the occasional diva tantrum from His Majesty Chico. The classic one we all remember is the time we drove to my Gran and Grampsies caravan for the weekend and stopped to let the dogs out on one of those country roads that run through fields. We were halfway to the caravan. Opra gamboled around and did her usual. Chico did his regal sniffing around and relieving himself. On calling him back to the car, he took a sulk and turned around indignantly and started trotting for home, which was over 40 miles away. I had to chase after him as the family sat giggling in the car and grabbed him, almost getting bitten in the process. He spent the rest of the journey in a grump. However, the years were catching up with Chico. By time he hit 13, he found it hard to walk and eventually gave it up and sat glowering around the house. Unfortunately his mood didn?t impr
                    ove with age. He was frail and didn?t like people coming to close to him unless it was time to visit the john in the back yard or dinner time. He ate a lot. He also developed a strange habit when the family sat down to dinner. We would be sitting in the living room and we would hear his claws clacking on the kitchen lino or see him clambering downstairs. Then he would lie on his belly and start doing a swimming motion across the living room floor until he reached the other side of the room. Once there, he?d roll over the floor, growling and whining in the process. Then he?d get up and stare at my Mum until she gave him food. He did this right up to the end. Eventually I left home I went to college in Glasgow. Chico gradually went down hill as he got older. He became quite blind and deaf and would lie around all day sleeping. He was normally quite docile unless someone went near him, when he would jump, growl and snap. The only other time he?d perk up was when Opra went into season; that?s another story altogether? One night last summer, when Chico was 16, he let my Mum pat him and stroke him for the first time in two years. The next day, while my step-dad was working on the car, Chico walked off down the hill and never came back. They say when dogs know it?s time to go, sometime they sneak away to die in peace. Chico my wee boy - March 1985 - July 2001. RIP you daft mutt.

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                      06.07.2002 04:40
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                      My westie is a year and a half and the first dog I have ever owned. I chose the westie because it was the first dog that really caught my attention when I was younger. They are truly the perfect all round dog. They are strong (even for such a small frame), non-aggrresive yet loyal and will protect you. They are mischevious and highly entertaining. The big down is that terriers tend to bark - alot! Although westies are highly trainable and we found a good anti-barking collar will ease the noise. But I have never regreted choosing to own one of the breed. Mine makes me laugh every minute. He loves to play and gives so much love back. Grooming: They need a hair cut about every three months (about £15) Health: Are prone to skin allergies but live to a good old age without much major trouble. Creams can be used for allergy treatment Looks: Strong little figure but so cute! Personality: loyal, obediant, mischevious, entertaining Excersise: Westies dont need a lot of excersise. A good hour's walk a day will having them sleeping for the next 23 hours. They do love the outdoors though, especially small holes and long grass. With any dog I recommend insurance, especially for westies who may need creams and anti-allergy medication in the summer.

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                        15.10.2001 16:36
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                        I had always wanted a westie, so my mum got me one in August 1999. He is a sweetheart, he doesn't bite but he barks. He loves the sound of his own voice and he loves people. (But he couldn't eat a whole one). Being a puppy stil he is very excitable and playful. He loves a lot of attention so when i'm out at college my mum can take care of him or my dad or my brother's. He's never without someone. A lot of people might say he's spoilt or i give him too much attention but i don't believe there is 'too much attention'. He just like a child he requires: Attention Love Food Water Toys Playtime A comfortable place to sleep ie my bed And regular grooming/exercise I couldn't imagine my life wothout him anymore that may sound a bit obsessed but i feel the same about him as most feel about their children. He is a great companion and a great friend! And one thing i can't say about my brother's rottweilers (although they were lovely dogs) he has never chewed anything but his own toys.

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                          27.07.2001 21:07
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                          My dog, Kerry, was a birthday present from my husband, ( my 25th Bithday!!!!, my god I'm getting old fast). She was the cutest puppy, a sort of cross between an ugly duckling and a labrador pup and a drowned rat. But I loved her the minute I laid eyes on her!!! We were supposed to be going on a shopping trip to buy me some jewellery, when my husband pulled into the kennels. I thought he had made a mistake and taken the wrong turning. It was a real surprise!! He had never had a dog, whereas I had had a Cocker Spaniel as a family pet when I was still at home. I had been nagging for ages about getting a puppy, but he had, or so I thought, refused point blank to have ' one of those smelly creatures in my house'. I was taken into the kennels to choose which pup I wanted. Kerry was the only bitch, there were two dogs, and I picked her instantly, as she came straight over when I leaned into the pen. We took her home in a cardboard box on my lap. I peeped inside the box all the time, and she stuck her little nose through the gap and tried to lick me. She was really noisy and kept banging into the box as we went round corners. She whimpered most of the way home. My husband had all the bits and pieces organised, food, bowls, old newspapers etc. ( My god writing this makes me realise how little effort we both put into each others Birthday celebrations now!!) She spent the whole of the first night crying and I was up and down all night checking on her. Eventually, after a few weeks, things calmed down and a routine was established. As a pup Kerry was very energetic and required frequent visits to the park and long walks to run off all her excess energy. She was very playful, and was immediately very lovable and enjoyed having her tummy tickled. As she grew older she calmed down, and when my kids arrived, all three of them, she was wonderful. She was very gentle with them, kept well out of the
                          way at toddler stage to avoid having her fur tugged, and would lie down and let them tickle her tummy. All of the kids love her to bits. Kerry is now 14 years old and has virtually gone deaf. She has slowed down cosiderably and sleeps a lot. She is still very friendly to us and any guests, and when she hears you, runs to the door to welcome you. Unfortunately she has developed a lump, just under her rib cage and I fear the worst. Tonight I am taking her to the vets, so fingers crossed. She has been a wonderful pet and I cant imagine life without her!!!

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