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6 Reviews
  • easy to grow
  • It makes butterflies come to my garden
  • none for me
  • Hard to stop them taking over
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    6 Reviews
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      22.08.2015 23:32
      Very helpful
      (Rating)

      Advantages

      • "It makes butterflies come to my garden"
      • "It looks very beautiful"
      • "It is very easy to grow"

      Disadvantages

      • "There are no disadvantages"

      Buddleja plant

      WHAT IS IT?

      This is a shrub that has got big leaves and beautiful long purple flowers that last for a long time. They grow back every summer and we cut ours down when it starts to die just before the winter and then in the spring it will start to grow again and by the time it is summer it gets bigger and more bushey every year.

      ARE THEY EASY TO LOOK AFTER?

      These plants are very easy to take care of. When we bought our Buddleja plant it was starting to grow and was already about the height of one foot and all we did was plant it into a hole with some plant food. When it rains the plant likes it but when the weather is dry I make sure that I give it alot of water so that it can grow, I apply some plant food to the soil that is around the plant sometimes but not always and I do not think it is needed always.

      WHAT I THINK

      I love this plant in the summer because it makes butterflies come into my garden when the purple flowers have flowered because they like the smell of it. It is easy to take care of and sometimes the plant grows so fast and big that I have to cut some of the branches off because they overhang onto the other part of my garden.

      My children have liked always to play around and sit nearby to our Buddleja plant because it is a happy plant that makes you think that summer is as beautiful and perfect as it should be always.

      I like that it does not need to be looked after very much and I can enjoy the plant instead of having to work hard at making it grow.

      5 Dooyoo Hearts.

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      21.06.2015 16:38
      Very helpful
      (Rating)

      Advantages

      • "Butterflies and bees love them"
      • "Hard to kill"
      • "Easy to grow"

      Disadvantages

      • "Hard to stop them taking over"

      Fill your garden with colour and attract butterflies and bees

      Buddleja is a woody shrub that’s very commonly found in British gardens, partly because it’s a super-easy plant to have around which thrives on very little attention and partly because it’s almost impossible to kill one unless you are really determined. The largest one in our garden grows to a spread of about 8 feet every year, despite being cut back to little more than a tiny stump each autumn. But if that’s too much for you to handle, take some advice from a nursery and buy a smaller species.

      Buddleja are often referred to as Butterfly Bush because their flowers attract a lot of butterflies and masses of bumble bees. This is the main reason we plant these in our garden as we’re trying to be bee-friendly. The other common name for them is ‘bombsite plants’ because they were widespread across the bombsites of the London Blitz.

      We have buddlejas with the typical spear-shaped flower heads as well as one with beautiful golden flower balls. This latter is most likely Buddleja Globosa and it’s golden ball flowers smell strongly of honey which is why the bees like them so much.

      There are a hundred different species available and they vary greatly in size and flower heads. We bought a set of small buddlejas for a bed where not much else grows (due to some rather thirsty Leylandii trees on the border between our house and our neighbours. We planted them to bulk out that bed where little seems keen to grow.

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      18.03.2015 10:10
      Very helpful
      (Rating)

      Advantages

      • "attracts butterflies"
      • "lovely flowers"
      • "easy to grow"

      Disadvantages

      • "none for me"

      BUDDLEJA

      As the weather starts to become more spring like I will be spending more time in my garden. Last year I added lots of new plants one of which was a Buddleja.


      The Buddleja is also commonly known as a butterfly bush due to the fact that it attracts butterflies. There are over 100 species of Buddleja and I bought one called Dartmoor; a large deciduous variety with light purple cone shaped flowers. This variety will grow to around 300 cm in height and spread to around 150 cm.


      There are so many choices when it comes to choosing a Buddleja from Dwarf plants that are suitable for growing in a container on the patio to large trees. The best time to plant a Buddleja is either in the spring or autumn when the soil is still moist. Buddleja are really easy to grow and require little maintenance. They do benefit from being pruned and this should be done in early spring once there is less risk of a frost.


      Buddleja prefer to be planted in either full sun or part shade, although I have one that thrives in the shade. They prefer well drained soil and will grow well in sandy clay or chalky soil.

      Buddleja will give a display of flowers for about 6 weeks from about the beginning of May during which time they will attract butterflies into the garden; a real bonus as far as I am concerned. A similar plant should cost you around £10, but prices will vary a lot depending on the size of the plant.


      Overall I think a Buddleja is a great addition to any garden as it not only gives a lovely bright display, but will also attract butterflies into the garden.

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      23.12.2014 17:56
      Very helpful
      (Rating)

      Advantages

      • "highly attractive to butterflies and pollinating insects"
      • "Beautiful to look at"

      Disadvantages

      • "Can require some harsh pruning"

      An Abundance Of Butterflies

      I have a Buddleja in my garden that was planted over ten years ago and I consider it to be one of the best features of my garden. I first acquired it from a family member who said they were a fantastic plant for attracting butterflies, something I dearly wanted to do.

      The most recognisable Buddleja plants are the purple varieties often seen up and down the country along railway lines. I have a white flowering variety called the Buddleja davidii or 'White Bouquet'.

      It is a tall shrub with thick woody branches at the base from which thinner branches will grow. Each branch, which has large deep green leaves along their length, then produces one large head of many tiny flowers at the end of the branch. Often branches will have several other flower heads behind this but they tend to be smaller in size. My own Buddleja tends to grow about 7ft tall every year from a core height of older wood which is about 5ft. It grows profusely every year and is always quite thick (3-4ft width) so I cut it back every Autumn to about three or four inches to the base of each individual flowering branch, leaving a few buds at the base of the older wood for next years growth.

      The flowers on Buddleja shrubs are very beautiful, grand and imposing. Each head, when looked at closely, actually has tiny compact flowers that are bunched together. The flower heads are like very large cones which taper away to a thin point.

      The Buddleja is extremely valuable to wildlife gardeners. I always see dozens of butterflies on the flowers and they remain their for hours drinking up the precious nectar. Peacocks and Red Admirals tend to be the main visitors but I also see commas, large whites, skippers and others. The flowers are also very valuable to bees, wasps and flies. At the height of flowering the Buddleja is literally covered in dozens of butterflies, hence why the plant is commonly known as 'the butterfly bush'. My Buddleja tends to flower in mid to late summer, but I live in the north of England and have noticed that Buddleja bushes further south tend to flower sooner.

      In order to prolong the flowering on the Buddleja I deadhead any dead flowers from the shrub as soon as they die off, allowing the nutrients to go into other parts of the bush. The flowers are always an excellent source of nectar for insects later on in the summertime.

      I would definitely recommend the Buddleja to anyone with a medium to large sized garden who wish to plant something that is beneficial to insects. I am hoping to plant a second Buddleja in my patch soon as I think they are one of the finest shrubs you can have in your garden!

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      09.12.2014 18:16
      Very helpful
      (Rating)

      Advantages

      • "Easy to care for and maintain"
      • "Can grow surprisingly big"
      • "Attracts butterflies to the garden"
      • "A beautiful large flowering plant"

      Disadvantages

      • "None at all!"

      Butterflies In My Garden

      Our Buddleia bush is around six years old and was in the garden when we bought the house, planted by the previous owner who wanted something large but reasonably ornate to hide a rough patch on the fence - it was supposed to be a stop-gap apparently but in the end he grew to love the bush and kept it there even after having a new fence fitted prior to us moving in.

      I love it myself and am happy to have kept it, we had Buddleia a few years ago but it wasn't really suitable for the garden we had at the time an we ended up digging it out before we put the house on the market - I didn't know it was Buddleia and even if I had it would have still needed to go as it had grown surprisingly tall so blocked some of the light from the kitchen window which prospective buyers wouldn't have been impressed by.

      The Buddleia Bush is also known as the Butterfly Bush as it attracts butterflies of all different varieties, this year we've mainly had lots of small creamy white butterflies landing on the plant but last summer we spotted some wonderful orange and red ones which were much bigger. It's impossible to say what butterflies will come to the plant during any given summer but anything that brings butterflies into my garden is fantastic as far as I'm concerned!

      Ours also attracts bees, which is also fine with me although the kids and their allergic dad aren't quite so pleased about those little buzzing visitors!

      You don't have to do much for the bush to thrive, keep it watered during the hot months and prune back the sections as they die off at the end of Autumn/early Winter to give the plant the best chance possible of coming back to life in the Spring. One thing to be aware of is the fact that there are loads of different varieties of Buddleia and come can spread like crazy, a semi-tall and wide bush can end up double the size next summer and sometimes another small Buddleia plant will appear in another area of your garden as the pollen (or seeds, I'm not sure...!) can travel so effectively at times.

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      25.05.2008 16:24
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      Disadvantages

      Originally native to Asia the Buddleja is now one of the commonest British plants

      The Buddleja is a very fast growing plant that will be familiar to almost everyone. When I was growing up my parents always had these growing at the bottom of their garden and we always called them "Butterfly Bushes" due to the fact that throughout the Summer months they would always be covered in brightly coloured butterflies. As an adult I was somewhat surprised to discover that the "Butterfly Bush" was actually the official common name of these plants, which are botanically known as Buddleja Davidii.

      When I moved into the house that I currently live in it was always my intention to create a "Wildlife Garden" in the area at the back of the garden, beyond my garage and shed, and remembering these lovely plants from my childhood I knew that no "Wildlife Garden" would be complete without a Butterfly Bush, or two.

      My parents still live in the same house that I was raised so I decided that my bushes would be grown from cuttings taken from my parent's plants. These plants must now be well over thirty years old, although they are well cared for, and cut back and pruned every year.

      Propagating plants is often feared by the amateur gardener but there are some plants that grow so easily you simply cannot fail. Thankfully, the Buddleja is one such plant.

      The easiest way to grow a new plant is to simply break off some short branches in early Spring and place these sticks in damp soil. It is important that the soil should not be allowed to dry out. Within a few weeks these branches will have put down their own roots and then they can be transplanted elsewhere. This is how I obtained the two bushes at the bottom of my garden, which are still quite small, but I know that they will grow quickly.

      New plants can also be created by a method known as "Air Layering". This involves partially cutting the stem of a new shoot with a sharp knife. A small amount of damp compost should then be placed around this cut and the whole area covered with a small polythene bag. By the end of the same Summer this stem can be removed from the parent plant. This method is for a slightly more advanced gardener than myself, but I presume that it would probably give a greater sense of achievement to produce a new plant in this way.

      The third option is to grow these plants from seed. Seeds can be collected from these plants at the end of the Summer after all of the flowers have died. The seed heads should be allowed to dry on the plants before being removed and collected.

      The ease with which a new plant will grow is one of the reasons why the Buddjela has been so successful in Britain. Originally native to China and Northern India this plant was brought to Europe during the eighteenth century and flourished. In fact it was so suited to the British climate that it quickly escaped from the gardens and today in many areas where it grows freely it is actually considered to be a weed.

      This is often one of the first plants to establish itself on wasteland. It is commonly found on railway embankments and will even grow inside derelict buildings in urban areas.
      There is no doubt that if left unattended these plants will quickly take over an area and get out of control. In these situations their branches become long and straggly.

      In a controlled situation like at the bottom of my garden these plants should be severely cut back at the start of every Spring time. Many amateur gardeners are nervous about pruning but the truth is that you can be quite harsh with these. Cutting back a plant at the beginning of Spring will not stop it from flowering that same Summer.

      The flowers that a Buddleja Bush produces are usually lilac coloured, or sometimes a deeper shade of purple. These flowers grow on long, elongated stems and due to their weight hang downwards. These flowers are very rich in nectar and they have a lovely sweet smell. This is why they are so attractive to butterflies, although they will also attract other insects including bees.

      As a lover of wildlife I believe that every garden should have a Buddleja Bush. It is actually a proven fact that these plants have almost single-handedly helped to increase the numbers of butterflies in urban areas, this is particularly true of two butterfly species, the Peacock and the Small Tortoiseshell.

      The Buddleja Davidii derives its name from Père Armand David, a French naturalist, and an English Reverend called Adam Buddle, who was a botanist. They created the first domestic hybrid of this plant and ever since there has been quite a debate over the spelling of the word Buddleja, which is also often spelled Buddleia.

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