Welcome! Log in or Register
£17.24 Best Offer by: amazon.co.uk See more offers
3 Reviews

Trumpeted yellow spring flower. Narcissus is the botanic name for a genus of hardy, mostly spring-flowering, bulbs. There are several Narcissus species that bloom in the autumn. Daffodil is a common English name, sometimes used now for all varieties. They are mostly native to the Mediterranean region, but a few species are found through Central Asia to China. The range of forms in cultivation has been heavily modified and extended, with new variations available in nurseries almost every year.

  • Sort by:

    * Prices may differ from that shown

    More Offers
  • Write a review >
    How do you rate the product overall? Rate it out of five by clicking on one of the hearts.
    What are the advantages and disadvantages? Use up to 10 bullet points.
    Write your reviews in your own words. 250 to 500 words
    Number of words:
    Write a concise and readable conclusion. The conclusion is also the title of the review.
    Number of words:
    Write your email adress here Write your email adress

    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    3 Reviews
    Sort by:
    • More +
      09.03.2008 20:02
      Very helpful
      (Rating)
      3 Comments

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      a brilliant spring flower

      Daffodils are bulb flowers that have a trumpet shape in the middle of the flower which has 6 petals around it, the traditional daffodil is bright yellow but i have this year brought me some in white.

      Daffodils are very popular flowers usually associated with easter, i think this has more to do with the fact that they are one of only a few flowers which bloom this early in the year than anything else though.

      Daffodils are quite tall usually about 1 1/2 foot tall but there are dwarf species available which is the ones i brought last year in the white i mentioned earlier, these look beautiful inbetween my large daffodils and are a lot better as my large daffodils have a tendancy to get blown over in the wind, these are a lot shorter so they dont get battered by the weather.

      Daffodils begin to flower at the end of february, they are realy easy to grow and are an ideal way to give a little colour to the usually dull gardens at the end of winter.

      You will need to plant your daffodil bulbs at the end of september, about 6 inches into the soil and dont plant them too close together as these return every year with more and more flowers so if you put them too close together they wont get enough light or nutrients, about 1 to 1 1/2 foot apart will do nicely.

      Once your daffodils have finished flowering dont cut the leaves and stems off untill they die as they are a good light source for your bulb which is already getting ready for next year.

      I love daffodils as it is not something i have to replace every year, once planted you can forget about them and year after year enjoy flowers at the begining of spring.

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        06.04.2007 18:01
        Very helpful
        (Rating)
        14 Comments

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        RECOMMENDED.

        When you think of spring what do you imagine? Lambs jumping in the fields, warmer days, lighter evenings? I think of fields of Daffodils, lining the road edge and clumped under trees in the local park.

        The Daffodil has to be one of the happiest and refreshing flowers there are and I love the bright yellows and paler whites of the various Daffodil types there are. The most common daffodil you will see and probably be aware of is the Trumpet Narcissus. This is the variety that has one large trumpet like flower (usually bright yellow) on top of a larger, sturdy pale green stem and leaves. However there are many other species of Daffodils and these days most of them can be brought from garden centres and plant shops.

        Amongst the other varieties I also love the Miniature Narcissus. These can range in style from mini versions of the trumpet mentioned above to mini versions of the double narcissus. I love these especially in the borders at the front, as they are very petite and very pretty. Another thing I like about the mini daffodils is that although they look very delicate and sway easily in the breeze, they do seem to be particularly sturdy.

        Daffodils are planted from bulbs in late autumn. You need to time it quite well as the soil must still be soft so the bulb can get it’s roots out but not so mild that they will begin to grow. Obviously this will vary slightly each year but I would suggest mid October as a good guide. For the best results in growing positions you need to remember that Daffodils require a lot of sunshine and are not really partial to shade, although they will grow, so open spaces and in full sun borders is ideal.

        To plant the bulbs you need to dig a hole three times as deep as the bulb is wide and pop it inside. Tap down the soil gently and leave it be. You don’t need to add any fertiliser or food at this point, as you really don’t want to encourage early growing. Once it has grown and flowered in the late winter, early spring, you can give it a little nourishment but it is only essential once a year. They are not particularly fussy when it comes to soil types but they do like a well-drained spot to flourish.

        To allow the best display from your Daffodils, it may be necessary to divide them every five years or so, and the best time to do this is at planting time again. Dig up the bulbs and separate out, planting in wider areas for best flowering results. Along the same lines once the flowers have died and the leaves begin to wilt, a lot of people will mow them or cut them off to avoid the unattractive mess that is created by dying foliage. Whilst some people have reported no problems after doing this, others have found that the following year the Daffodil grows blind, which means it has no flower. Plant experts recommend leaving the leaves to completly rot down back into the soil, replenishing any nourishment back into the bulb and soil. This can leave your garden looking a real mess as it takes quite a while for the whole process to happen and if you choose to hide the rotting foliage with another plant, choose one that doesn’t mind being quite dry, as the daffodils rely on a fairly dry summer to replenish themselves ready for the next flowering season.

        Another lovely resource of the Daffodil is for cut flowers and it really cheers a room up when I see a thick bunch of beautiful yellow daffs in a vase. This is particularly pretty to look at if you have a mixture of colours and styles and this may only be conventionally achieved by buying from a florist. However if you do have a garden full, I would be inclined to leave them there, as the beauty will last a lot longer.

        Finally as a word of warning Daffodils have a sap which is toxic to other flowers so in the interests of flower preservation if you are cutting from the garden, allow the daffodil to stand alone in it’s own vase for 12 hours or so to dispel the poison before adding into a vase with different species of flowers. Additionally you should never re-cut the stems of the daffodils if they are housed with different types, as the sap would be able to leak out again. For humans and animals the Daffodil bulb is poisonous so make sure you wash your hands thoroughly after handling and make sure none are left lying around unplanted, especially if your dog is the equivalent of a rubbish bin like ours!

        The nodding heads of the yellow, cream and orange flowers never fail to make me smile and signify spring is finally on the way.

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
          More Comments
        • More +
          25.02.2006 16:16
          Very helpful
          (Rating)
          18 Comments

          Advantages

          Disadvantages

          A spring flower

          I have just spent a couple of hours in the garden. The weather is bitterly cold but very sunny and I am feeling extremely uplifted. Gardening is very therapeutic, but I find it more so at this time of the year when the spring bulbs are everywhere and getting ready to flower. My favourite spring flower is the daffodil. I must have at least 400 in my garden and more growing in pots. I grow lots of varieties too. After winter they appear and this cheerful spring bloom signals that spring is on its way. Wonderful!



          Daffodils are horticulturally divided into 12 groups based on the form of the flowers. They provide a wide variety of shapes and forms, from the tiny exquisite Cyclamineus hybrids with their swept back petals, to the wonderfully tall trumpet daffodils and the more showy and my favourite double variety. In addition to the characteristic bright yellow flowers, others include those with pale butter --yellow blooms or brilliant white petals and fiery orange cups. The 12 groups are: -
          Trumpet

          Large cupped

          Small cupped

          Double

          Triandrus

          Cyclamineus

          Jonquil

          Tazeta

          Poeticus

          Split cupped

          Miscellaneous


          Rather than describe them all, I have chosen a few of my favourites, all of which I grow in my garden.


          Trumpet
          Perhaps the most commonly seen, it has solitary flowers, each has a trumpet as long as or longer than the petals. Included in this group are "trousseeau" which have milk white petals and straight, flanged soft lemon trumpets and "Kingscourt" which have rich gold trumpets with broad, rounded paler gold petals.


          Double
          Most have solitary large fully or semi double flowers with cups and petals. Some have smaller flowers in clusters of 4 or more. These can flower as late as early summer. My favourite daffodil the "ducat" comes into this group. This produces rich golden flowers, is very sturdy and is ideal for cutting. "Rip Van Winkle" is another, not as commonly grown these shaggy, double flowers have densely arranged flat, tapering greenish - lemon petals with incurving tips.


          Tazeta
          Flowers are borne in clusters of either 12 or more small fragrant flowers per stem or 3 to 4 large ones. Cups are small and often straight sided with broad petals, which are mostly pointed. They flower late autumn to early spring. The "Pride of Cornwall" is my favourite in this range. Firstly biased by the name (I love Cornwall), it bears large, fragrant flowers, each with milk white petals and rich yellow cups. Again this group is ideal for cutting.



          WHY I LIKE DAFFS

          Daffodils make ideal spring bedding flowers. They are the most reliable of bulbs for naturalizing and they rarely need lifting in borders or grass.They hardly ever suffer from disease,although some varieties may be prone to bulb flies but this is rare. Dwarf Daffodils such as "tete a tete" are ideal for rock gardens. Daffodils will grow in any type of soil and will thrive in sun or shade. They are also cheap to buy and will provide a wonderful vase. Planting time is from September to December. Plant 12 to 15cm deep.

          Price

          Bulbs can be bought for as little as 10 pence each for the most common varieties. The more exotic sell for around 50 pence. Currently bunches of daffs can be bought, two bunches for £1.00. Bunches usually contain 10 flowers. Although when cut they only last about a week, during that time, they will brighten up any room at very little cost.


          With names like tahiti, cheerfulness and ambergate, together with their vibrant colours of yellow and orange or their creamy milk tones, it is no wonder that daffodils brighten our spring and that is why they have remained my firm favourite.

          Comments

          Login or register to add comments
            More Comments