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Anethum graveolens is a short-lived annual herb, native to southwest and central Asia. It is the sole species of the genus Anethum, though classified by some botanists in the related genus Peucedanum as Peucedanum graveolens (L.) C.B.Clarke. Fresh and dried dill leaves (sometimes called dill weed to distinguish it from dill seed) are used as herbs. Like caraway, its fernlike leaves are aromatic, and are used to flavor many foods, such as gravlax (cured salmon), borscht and other soups, and pickles. Dill is said to be best when used fresh, as it lose its flavor rapidly if dried; however, freeze-dried dill leaves preserve their flavor relatively well for a few months.

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      07.12.2004 21:37
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      Bet you didnt know that Dill is a close relative of the carrot, it has a similar long taproot as well as a delicate fast growing spindly stem. Dill will grow quickly from seed, best sown in early spring. In a sunny location and in an moist acidic soil, the plant will grow to 3 feet and once established are easily harvested. They can be harvested after about two months, but I would suggest leaving some in the garden to ensure a fresh supply of this wonderful herb all year round.

      Records from Egyptian tombs 3000 years ago show that Dill was being used as a digestive aid and a remedy for gas. Dioscorides, a first century Greek physician prescribed the herb so frequently that it was known as the "herb of Dioscorides". The Romans chewed the herb to promote digestion and it has been used in China to similar affect for at least 1000 years. The word Dill comes from the Viking word, Dilla, which means "to soothe" which shows that they were also aware of its properties. When the puritan settlers took the plant to North America it was given to children to chew during long sermons and aquired the name "meetin` seed"

      As well as the digestive and gas remedies which have been apparent to all cultures throughout the ages, Dill seems defeat certain bacteria, especially those that cause infectious diarrhea and urinary tract infections. Adding Dill to your bath may help to defeat the E.coli that causes UTI and is a totally safe way of using the herb. Dill is also being tested for its properties regarding the reducing high blood pressure.

      The Leaves can be chewed as a breath freshener, or an infusion made of a small amount of the seed in boiling water will aid gas and digestive problems. Use weaker solutions for the young or the old, though Dill is a very safe plant to use. The leaf and seed are considered non-toxic but in some more sensitive
      individuals a slight rash is the only found side effect.

      Dill in the house is meant to clear the mind and discourage negativity, and is particularly associated with Midsummer and Beltane when it is thrown onto the bonfires or added to the handfasting cup.

      Dill is best known today for its use in preserving pickles, a use that was known through out the ages and was wide spread in the pre refridgerator days. So basically its an easy to grow and quick result garden plant with lots of uses in medicine and cooking.




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        14.02.2002 01:17
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        What a polite way of asking if you are inclined to 'fart'. Well, you obviously do have that problem, ( or you know someone who does), or you wouldn't be reading this opinion. If you want to know how to grow dill in your garden there are lots of opinions in this section. They will help you to be as good as Percy Thrower, (oops, showing my age now), I mean as good as Alan Titchmarsh. This opinion is written to help use this invaluable herb to its best advantage. Dill is not a nasty green cucumber like thing that lurks inside burger buns. Well, this dill isn't anyway. This is a herb that has many uses in culnary preparation and medicine. The full Latin name for this plant is: Anethum graveolens. This little plant is actually considered to be a weed and it has straight, hollow stems and yellow, umberella shaped flowers. It belongs to the Umbelliferae family of plants (a clue here to its umberella shaped flowers). (This is the same group as aniseed, carrot and fennel so you should expect similar properties.) The leaves are divided into small, thin strips and release a mellow aroma when crushed. This plant originated in the Orient but now grows all over the world, especially in the Mediterranean region where it can be found in the wild, especially in mountainous regions, along the roadside. Dill can be eaten in salads, with fish, or as a seasoning for meat. It also adds a unique flavour and aroma if used in the cooking of rice. Dill has been used since the earliest times as a medicine and as a herb for cooking. In German and the Scandinavian countries it is eaten with fish and cucumber, and the seeds are baked into bread. The properties of this herb are similar to those of fennel and aniseed (remember its the same family.) The leaves and flat seeds aid the digestion and help to counteract stomach cramps (antis
        pasmodic). Dill helps to reabsorb intestinal gases and ease stomach and gut discomfort. These benefits can be enjoyed simply by adding dill to your food as described above, or by making an infusion of the fresh, or dried herb. Infusion (Dill): One teaspoon of dill to a cup of boiling water. Leave to infuse for about ten minutes then drink. A cup before meals is beneficial if you have digestive problems. This infusion can be drunk either hot, or cold. Remember that dried herbs are usually very much stronger than fresh ones. You may have to adjust the amount used to suit your own taste. Its a good idea to start off with a weak solution and make it stronger if you prefer. The British Herbal Pharmacopoeia lists dill as being a soothing digestive aid for indigestion, wind, colic, etc, especially in children. As with all herbal remedies, you should watch for unusual symptoms after taking it. Although it is very unlikely that you will have any adverse effects, if you do have any unexplained symptoms it is wise to stop taking the prearation and perhaps try something else. Everyone is different so what suits one may not have the same benefits for another person.

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          28.06.2001 18:07
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          Dill is a great plant to cook with and therfore makes an ideal addition to your window sill herb collection (If you haven't got one, start with this plant). Not only does it taste good, but its feathery leaves and yellow flowers are quite attractive. Dill will grow very happily from seed - any good plant shop should be able to furnish you with some. if you are planting indoors, you can start it at any time. Dills make a good snack for a range of bugs, so you will probably stand a better chance of keeping it alive if you grow it indoors. With a little attention it is an easy plant to grow indoors. Fill a large pot with soil and fertiliser (I planted mine in a mixture of mushroom composte and manure, which has worked very well) Place the seeds just below the surface, you can put a dozen or so in a large pot. Water regularly. In about a week you will start getting little green shoots that look a lot like grass. The characteristic green fronds will appear later. Keep you dill in a sunny spot, avoid strong draughts because the plants are quite delicate and can get blown about. Water daily - a little water every day seems to suit them very well. If you haven't used composte, you should also feed your plants every week - I haven't done much experimenting on this score, but a generic plant food will probably do well enough. Harvesting your dill: The older leaves seem to have the strongest flavour - these are best for cooking while younger leaves go well in salads. Dill is not a plant that will reshoot once cropped, so do not cut the main stem unless you are happy to restrict the herb's growth. Dill does not produce leaves that rapidly so you will neeed quite a lot of plants if you want a constant supply early on. When the plants flower and produce seeds, you can keep these seeds either for replanting or for consumption. Using dill: Dill has a very rich, herby earthy flavour and goes well in almost anything savoury. Add to
          white sauces to accompany fish. Add to cheese sauce. Add to soups and stews. It also goes very well in salads and sandwiches. You can dry dill to store it - hanging the plants in a dry space is tradition, but if you have not got much time, place in a tray and put in the oven at a very low heat.

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            14.04.2001 02:50
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            Dill is a hardy annual from southern europe and western Asia. It is closely related to the perrenial fennel and if these two plants are to be grown in the same garden they need to be well spaced apart to prevent cross pollination which will produce a hybrid variety. Dill has the typical bluish green feathery leaves and yellowish green clusters of flowers but will not grow as tall as fennel. It requires a sunny, free draining spot with plenty of water in the summer months. It can be sown in March/April onwards where you want the plants to grow and to give time for them to set seed. Successive sowings can be made throughout the growing season to produce plants for garnish and flavouring. Dill is succeptible to greenfly and leaf hopper so can be treated with a soapy solution such as washing up liquid ( 2 parts to 5 parts water) and sprayed on the infected plants. The seeds have an aniseed flavour and can be used in pickles, especially with cucumber and gherkin, but also in biscuits and cakes. The pretty feathery leaves make an attractive garnish. The milder leaves are often used in fish dishes and dill vinegar.

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