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Fuchsia Hardy

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  • Easy to look after.
  • Hardy.
  • May not survive the harshest of British winters.
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      18.12.2014 12:40
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      • "Easy to look after."
      • Hardy.
      • Colourful.

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      • "May not survive the harshest of British winters. "

      Hardy Fuchsias - My Favourite Colourful Flowering Plant

      Fuchsias come in a large range of colours, sizes and degrees of hardiness/tenderness. I always like to plant hardy plants in my garden, even though I live in the milder climate of southern England.

      MY HARDY VARIETIES

      Fuchsia Magellanica – This is the hardiest of my varieties. It can grow tall, up to 3m if allowed to. The flowers are the most usual fuchsia colour of purple trumpets, surrounded by cerise sepals. Although the flowers are comparatively small, they make up for this in their profuse numbers. In autumn I prune mine so that it is just below fence level, to help protect it from strong winter winds. You can, however, keep it a lot smaller if you wish.

      Fuchsia Snowcap – This has plentiful large showy flowers. It has full white centres (where other fuchsias have comparably thin trumpets), topped with pink sepals. To me, the pink upturned petals look like the bodice of a ballet tutu, and the white petals the skirt. A mature plant can grow to 120cms.

      Fuchsia Delta’s Sarah – This has the unusual colouring of bluey/purple trumpets, that fade to pink as they age, with white sepals, and will grow to 30cms.

      Fuchsia Mrs Popple – This is brightly coloured having deep purple centres with dark pink sepals and dark green foliage. She will grow to 1m tall.

      Fuchsia Sunray – This one has lovely variegated foliage of light green, edged with cream, and splattered with red. It has a height and spread of 50cms, and deep pink and purple flowers.

      I have had the best results from those fuchsias planted in full sun, provided that their soil is well watered by me in dry weather, but I also have some that have tolerated partial shade.

      MY CUTTINGS

      I have found raising fuchsia cuttings the easiest of all my plants, when taken in the peak summer growing season.

      Although all my fuchsia varieties are classed as hardy, and therefore frost resistant, this does not guarantee that they will survive a harsh winter, so I like to take cuttings to over-winter in my shed, on a shelf by the window. I haven’t got the room to take in many full sized plants in pots, but with cuttings, if I lose the parent plant, I will have one to replace it. If all my fuchsias survive what the winter throws at them, friends and family are always willing to take any spares off my hands.

      RECOMMENDATION

      Hardy Fuchsias are my favourite colourful flowering plant. The lovely pendent flowers of my different varieties brighten my days throughout summer and autumn.

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        28.03.2011 12:11
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        Excellent garden standard

        We inherited a hardy fuchsia that was in the garden when we bought our house. Prior to encountering this plant, I hadn't had much truck with fuchsias, personally, and had been unaware that there are at least two 'types' of them; the perennial, bush-growing hardy fuchsia that grows into a shrub and survives outdoors from year to year, versus the smaller 'bedding plant' type fuchsia that turns up mostly as a source of summer colour in hanging baskets and which will not survive the winter frosts. While all fuchsias seem to have in common a woody-stemmed growth habit (to a greater or lesser extent), the flowers of the two types are also typically slightly different - with a greater size and range of flower colours available from 'bedding' type, non-hardy fuchsias. The frost-hardy varieties on the other hand can be grown as hedging plants, and apparently fuchsia hedges and even semi-wild hedgerows are a feature in some counties of the south-west, such as Devon and Cornwall.

        Left to its own devices, the hardy fuchsia we have in the garden would have a delicate, arching, long-stemmed growth habit. The thin woody stems have light red-brown bark and grow over a metre long and if it wasn't pruned, this would be a large and substantial shrub. It's growing near a path however and hence needs to be kept in check. Another reason for pruning it is that the plant is deciduous, losing its foliage in the winter (or at least, the leaves die back) and as it's slow to put out new leaves the following year (these don't seem to come till very late in spring / early summer), it spends several months looking like something of an eye-sore so reducing the size generally helps.

        In summer, it puts forth delicate, narrow-looking leaves, in a shade of red-tinged green, followed by abundant red flowers. These have four scarlet-red petals surrounding a purple, tubular 'inner ring' of petals, with long red stamens that extend beyond the inside of the 'inner tube'. Some of these blooms give rise to longish, pod-like reddish green 'berries' - which are reputedly edible; I have seen recipes for fuchsia-berry jam, but am not convinced enough by the sources of these recipes to believe in the edibility of the fruit.
         

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        20.09.2010 13:46
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        A tough plant for all conditions

        One of the abiding memories I have from my childhood is our fuchsia hedge which in summer was covered with 'ballerinas' in deep red and purple, fluttering and dancing from arching stems of dark purple with green leaves. Many's the time I'd stand by that hedge, popping the buds (an early equivalent to popping bubblewrap). My childhood home, by the way, was in the wilds of north east Lancashire so any fuchsia hedge needed to be extremely hardy to withstand the wind, rain and killing frosts.

        The hedge, in fact, was fuchsia magellanica, very similar to the picture shown at the top of this review. Although originating in South America, fuchsia magellanica has adapted so well to the British climate that it now grows wild in the Isle of Man. Our hedge dated from when the house was built, so had been there since the mid 1930s, a testament to its incredible hardiness especially as it's still going strong some seventy five years later. A cutting taken from this hedge now flourishes in my own front garden and has, of course, thrived in the milder Berkshire climate.

        Magellanica isn't the only hardy variety of fuchsia, of course, as there are literally hundreds of cultivars ranging in colours from white and palest pinks to deep reds and purples. The flowers can be single or doubles, some with their sepals flung back to reveal their underskirts or the more demure flowers showing just a hint of what's underneath. These varieties of plant are all due to the enthusiasm this plant seems to waken in some gardeners, who take their hobby to the highest level and create variations in colour of both flower and foliage, flower type and size.

        Fuchsia size can be as varied as their colouration, from Tom Thumb which is a dwarf cultivar in purple and mauve up to the stately Magellanica which, if left to its own devices, can grow as high as 3 metres.

        These plants will not only withstand the coldest British winter but are also prepared to grow in just about any conditions from full sun to the shadiest spot in the garden although they do prefer a well drained soil.

        Most people buy one or two fuchsia plants to act as focal points in their borders or to liven up a container but the taller species look great growing as a clump, adding both colour and movement at the back of the border.

        The frost kills the flowers, of course, but once cut down these plants will regenerate themselves the following year to produce another stunning display of colour.

        Propagation of hardy fuchsias is easy enough for even a beginner to accomplish. Choose a healthy looking stem and using a sharp knife, remove a cutting taken from just under a pair of leaves. The cutting should be approximately one inch in length. Remove the bottom two leaves and plant the cutting in good quality compost but don't firm down the compost, instead gently tap the sides of the pot to settle the soil around the stem. Water the cutting and either put the plant pot into a propagator or, what I do, is pop a plastic bag over the pot and put into the greenhouse or on a window sill out of direct sun if possible.

        In about three weeks there should be new growth, after which the plants should be put into individual pots to grow on until big enough to plant out in the garden. If the cuttings are taken at the end of the summer, as long as they have developed enough root growth, they should survive the winter in a cold greenhouse.

        Fuchsias can also be grown from seed which requires removing the berries from your plant and scraping out the seeds. Lay the seeds on the top of moist compost and cover with a very thin layer of compost. Cover and leave in a well lit place until germination takes place. My experience is that germination is rather hit and miss and I'm afraid I've never been successful at using this method.

        As there are so many varieties, it's impossible to recommend any named cultivars. Every garden centre and even the supermarkets, sell fuchsias for very little money and with a little time and patience, you can increase your stock very easily.

        These are pretty plants which thrive in most garden conditions without any trouble and provide a stunning display throughout the late summer and into the autumn. After flowering, cut back to ground level and after a winter sleep, these hardy little souls are ready to go again the following year.

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          30.04.2006 15:28
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          Beautiful

          Hardy fuchsia

          There is something particularly exquisite about the fuchsia, to me it is a sign of the summer. It is a spectacular plant which adds colour and attracts the bee's and butterflies into the garden.
          There are lots of varieties of fuchsia to choose from and they can be grown as a shrub, a bush , as a hedgerow, or in pots and greenhouses. They also make an attractive hanging basket too.

          The flowers of the fuchsia looks like a tubular shaped flower which opens at the end into four spreading sepals and four overlapping petals which form a bell at the bottom of the bloom, this makes it such an attractive plant, as there are different shades and colours to choose from, when deciding which type to grow. I have a huge fuchsia bush outside in my garden which spans about five feet wide and grows to about four feet high, it never fails to blossom in the summer and the flowers are the most vivid red and pink you'd ever imagine. It's name is - "Brilliant" if your looking to liven up your garden with colour.

          Fuchsia's can be bought at all the garden centres and vary in price from 99p upwards, this all depends on the size of the plant your looking for, but I always like to go to the boot sales on Sundays as I fine that these are the best places to find plants, people are always more generous with their prices at the boot sales and your dealing with gardeners who can give you advice about the cutting they have just got out of their garden and not the garden centre which is more like a supermarket for plant sales.

          Most fuchsia can be grown in pots and transplanted to the area's of the garden you want them to stay later on when they are bigger, a hardy plant will withstand the winter months too, so once you have planted it in the area you want it to grow you can forget about it and watch it take and grow into a nice sized shrub or bush. They make excellent hedges if you want to add colour to your gardens borders, and add colour to an otherwise green area of the garden.

          They will grow in almost any soil, as long as it is well drained and they do like a little bone meal as food when you plant them out. The best time for planting outdoors is May or June and they like full sun or half shaded area's of the garden, this is why they make such good plants for a hedge as they can handle being in the sunlight during the hot months, but you have to remember they like a good watering too. You can cut them back in November but if your looking for a larger plant or hedging then leave them grow over the winter.

          A fuchsia will grow quickly unless it is one of the more rarer found species like the Miss California which is a slow growing one, but has a lovely pink and white flower worth the time and effort.
          You can take cutting from the fuchsia by cutting the shoots which have no flowers buds on them in March, cut the shoot about 3-4 inches long and put in pots of an equal mixture of peat and sand and water well. There can be grown in the greenhouse until bigger.

          Fuchsias are usually trouble free but can suffer from diseases like black root, the sign of this is a discolouring of the leaves which will then fall off, it can be treated with powder from the garden centres.
          It can also be invaded with greenfly so keep a close eye on your plants as these little blighters can be very damaging and will spread to other plants and vegetables, causing lots of damage in the garden for their size, these can be got rid of easily with a spray from the garden centre.

          I love the fuchsia as there is colour and the sizes they grow can cover gaps in hedges and they catch the eye. The best varieties to grow in my opinion and if you can find them are:_

          Brilliant - A nice red and pink flowering shrub or hedging.
          Mission Bells - A deep vivid pink to add vibrant colour to the garden.

          Miss California - A Delicate pink and white.

          Ting-a-ling - An amazing white flowering shrub which takes the breath away. You have to see it to believe it.

          Swing time - Which makes the best hanging baskets, as it is a lovely red flower with creamy white petals forming the bell shape at the bottom.

          Have fun in your garden this year.

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            23.01.2005 20:16
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            Fuchsias look like elegant, delicate ladies who might shudder and faint as soon as it gets cold, but they are much tougher than they look. They can survive cold winters, frosts, storms, and years of neglect.

            They come in many varieties of various degrees of winter-hardiness.

            Just how 'hardy' they are depends on the area where you live: In the southwest, in big cities, and in coastal areas frosts are rarer, and therefore more types of fuchsia survive the winter outdoors than in the countryside, in the mountains, inland, and in the north.
            A fuchsia can be a wonderfully easy plant to grow, or one requiring a lot of skill and knowledge. It depends on the type you choose.

            If you're a fuchsia hobbyist who can wax lyrical about the numbers of petals and sepals, pollinates flowers with a camel hair brush, lovingly digs out the precious rare fuchsias of his collection every winter to replant them in the shelter of a heated greenhouse.... then you don't need my advice.

            However, if you're an inexperienced, unskilled, clumsy, impatient or plain lazy gardener, please read on.


            WHAT IT LOOKS LIKE

            Fuchsias are graceful-looking shrubs, growing about 1 to 2 meters high.

            They bearing lots flowers in summer and autumn, and often in winter, too. The blooms look like exotic earrings dangling from the branches. Mauve, pink and red are the most common flower colouors.


            WHICH VARIETY TO CHOOSE

            Fuchsia Magellanica is the hardiest and most easy to grow, wherever you live. It's definitely beginner-friendly.

            Within the species 'Magellancia' there are severeal cultivars to choose from, each with different flower colours.


            The most spectacular looking of these - and the one your neighbours are most likely to have - is Fuchsia magellanica 'riccartonii' with mauve&red blossoms. I'm sure your local garden centre will stocdk it.

            Fuchsia magellanica 'alba' has creamy-white flowers, wheras Fuchsia magellanica 'gracilis' has blooms which are all mauve and the effect is a bit dull except from closeup.


            There are, of course, lots of fuchsias, other than 'magellancia', but they need more care, knowledge or attention.

            You may like to try a Fuchsia 'Madame Cornelissen'. It's quite small (less than 1 m high and only 30 cm wide), but it is quite resilient to cold weather, flowers from midsummer to late autumn, and has pretty red&white blooms.


            HOW TO CARE FOR YOUR FUCHSIA

            If you've chosen a 'magellancia', you don't need to care for it at all. It will grow all by itself.

            I've recently done up a garden for people who had neglected it for four years. Under all the brambles and bindweed I found two lovely Fuchsia magellanica (different cultivars). They hadn't been pruned, they hadn't been fed, one of them was so covered with weedy growth that it had hardly got any light. Yet both were healthy and alive.

            So a Fuchsia magellanica is suitable even for lazy gardeners.

            However, if you want to be nice to you plant, there are a few things you can do:

            1. In the summer, when the weather is hot and dry, give it some water.

            2. Now and then, treat it to a spoonful of fertilizer. Ordinary multi-purpose plant feed will do. If you don't like using chemicals, then a few forkfuls of compost from your compost heap once a year is even better.

            3. Cut the whole plant down once a year, so that only an inch or two of the stems are still sticking out of the ground. Yes, really. It will grow back, stronger than before. Do this in spring. April is the best month for this.

            That's all!



            DON'T PANIC IF IT LOOKS DEAD

            If you live in a cold area, it's quite likely that all the branches die down in winter. Your plant may look mighty dead, and you may be tempted to pull it out. Don't worry: Your plant is just sleeping. Cut the dead stems off in the spring, and it will flourish.

            On the other hand, if you live in a warm part of the country, it may not die down.

            I live on the Sussex coast, and the Fuchsia magellanica around here are all still in magnificent bloom. It's 8 December! How's that for winter colour?

            WHERE TO PLANT

            Fuchsias are not fussy about where you plant them, as long as there is some sun. They don't mind mild shade. Ordinary garden soil will do.

            However: don't plant it under a tree. I don't know why, but fuchsias and trees have a longstanding feud. Usually it's the fuchsia who loses the battle, curls up and withers.



            HOW TO GET THE BEST EFFECT

            A Fuchsia looks lovely as the only shrub in a small flowerbed, surrounded by low annual bedding plants, especially white, pink, red or mauve flowering ones.

            You can also use it as part of a flowering hedge, or in a mixed border or shrub border.

            Fuchsias also look graceful in a container or in a hanging basket. However, the container or hanging basket has to be large, since the Fuchsia magellanica is quite a big plant. Besides, a Fuchsia in any sort of container will need constant watering in the summer; this is a distinct drawback for the lazy gardener.

            The most stunning effect is a Fuchsia hedge. Yes, a hedge with nothing but fuchsias. Even if you choose only fuchsias of one type, the effect will be breathtaking.

            However, I recommend this only if you live in a mild area, where the fuchsias *don't* die down in the winter. Otherwise your 'hedge' will crumble into a strip of decayying plant for several months of the year. Down here we're lucky: We have brightly-flowered hedges even now in winter.



            HOW TO GET FREE FUCHSIAS

            You can increase your fuchsia collection without spending any money by a method the experts call 'rooting softwood cuttings'.

            1. This is how it goes. In spring or summer, snip of the tips of some healthy looking branches - about the length of a finger.

            2. Remove the lower leaves.

            3. Stick the cuttings into a small pot full of multi-purpose compost. Stick them quite deeply, so that at least half the stem is underground.

            4. Place it on a windowsill where the sun is not scorching hot, keep the compost slightly moist.

            5. Keep the compost slightly moist. Keep the young plants indoors for their first winter.

            This method works. It's really as simple as that. Not all cuttings will root, but if you take a dozen and only two or three survive, you've still got three fuchsias.

            If you are willing to spend a bit more time, you can increase the chances by dipping the cuttings into a jar of 'hormone rooting powder', by using a propagator or by placing a clear plastic bag over the pot to conserve moisture.


            Don't be shy asking your neighbours if you may take cuttings of their fuchsias. They'll agree gladly, especially if you begin with "I've been admiring your fuchsia... it looks really healthy... what variety is it?... would you mind if I take a cutting? Or two or three or a dozen?"


            Every expert has a different opinion about when is the best time of the year for cuttings. Their advice can be anything from April to August. Most agree on 'early summer', but personally I've had the best results with August cuttings.


            I'm planning to write more plant reviews - all aimed at the inexperienced/unskilled/clumsy/frightened/impatient/lazy gardener. I would therefore welcome your feedback about what aspects of this review you found particularly interesting, as well as suggestions how to improve on it.





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              03.07.2002 03:13
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              Hello my green-fingered friends. I'm here to do a bit of a Charlie Dimcock, or whatever she's called.. Yes, I've got the right credentials. Well a couple of them at least - as you can no doubt tell from the slight nip in the air this evening. Mind you I haven't always been a gardening expert - oh no. In fact, between you and me, my plants never used to live very long . Many wouldn't even wait to die but preferred just to commit suicide. But all of that has changed now, it's amazing the difference it makes when you leave off your bra. As I look across my estate I feel uplifted as I breath in deeply and take in the splendour and colours before me. Quite outstanding - with the whites, reds and pinks on display. Okay, okay so I've only got a balcony but I do love a good fuchsia, don't you? And I can put on a decent, and occasionally indecent, show. For some reason I feel in tune with fuchsias. Who knows, perhaps I was once related to Leonhart von Fuchs, that well known German botanist, after whom these wondrous plants are named. It must obviously have been in another life because he lived from 1501 to 1566. The first real mention of fuchsias, however, was by a Jesuit monk called Father Charles Plumier. He spotted them with bloodshot eyes when on an 'all inclusive, drink as much as you want' bucket and spade holiday to the Dominican Republic. This was in 1703 or thereabouts. He was a somewhat serious clever Dick so he called them 'fuchsia triphylla flore coccineo'. Doesn't that annoy you about 'expert' gardeners? They love to use those long Latin names to impress and build up their parts a little. That reminds me of a story! There was this attractive woman whose tomatoes just wouldn't ripen, so she asked the guy next door what his secret was. He told her that the only way was to strip naked in front of the tomato plants twice a day and they would then so
              on go red with embarrassment. A few weeks later the neighbour asked her how the tomatoes were doing. "Still not too good", she replied, "But you should see the size of my cucumbers". Anyway, back to fuchsias. They were first introduced into Britain in 1788, or maybe it was 1789. It's not too important - just look at how many there are now. I love them. What I like are the magnificent colours, and have you ever really looked at the flowers? They are works of art. I've got a pair of lovely pink ones - and pink fuchsias too! Sorry, must be serious. I've also got red ones, red and mauve, red and pink and a fantastic white double flowered variety. Well I say white, but there is the most subtle delicate hint of pink on the outside petals. I've no idea what all the Latin names are, and I don't really care. They are just wonders of nature to be enjoyed. Now another reason why I love fuchsias is because I find them very easy to grow and so easy to ... to get more of them, whatever that's called. Propogation? Well, no matter, it's easy to take cuttings to increase the number of plants. This is what I do. It's probably not the right way but, hey, it works for me. When a plant is up and growing I pull off a few of the new shoots (about 6, 7 or 8 cm long, I'm not too fussy) and I plonk these in a jam jar filled with water. If there should be any buds I pinch these out and usually the bottom couple of leaves as well. After a few weeks, Bob's your Uncle, they develop roots. When they have I pop them into plant pots full of compost (bought from a DIY store) and, Fanny's your Aunt, I have some new fuchsia plants. It works every time. Now if you talk to my lovely dad he'll go on and on (and on) about how to look after fuchsias. But, you know what? Mine look just as good and without all of the fuss. He'll say something like, "Kay, now don&
              #39;t forget, as soon as they start growing early in the year you should feed them with a high nitrogen fertilizer. Then as soon as the buds appear you must switch to a high potash fertilizer". I answer him by saying, "Dad, isn't potash what you have left after you smoke a joint". Not that I smoke. He also pots his cuttings in a mixture of sedge peat, loam and silver sand. I just buy a bag of something or other that says 'compost' on the front from B&Q. I mix some dirt stuff or normal garden soil with this when the plants get bigger. Seems to do the trick. Fuchsias lust after a well drained soil that's all sort of loamy looking. They also need the correct amount of water - otherwise they get stroppy and let their flowers and buds drop off prematurely. If they are grown as indoor pot plants I'd suggest that they are immersed in water once a week - when you are soaking your undies, dentures or whatever. In winter water sparingly, but don't let them dry out completely, and they will be your friends for years to come. I look after my fuchsias, during the growing and flowering season, by simply watering them and removing dead flowers to encourage new ones. This way the display seems to stretch from as early as the beginning of June right through to October. In the winter some of the plants can look quite dead but they burst into life with a tickle and some early sunshine - pretty much like my boyfriend. I usually hack them back with some shears. My dad prunes his carefully, cutting back the main branches every year. The only problem I've ever had is 'rust' - that's the plants, not me. This can happen in damp, mild conditions. It's not very pleasant. The leaves turn yellowish and nasty black spots appear. It isn't fatal but definitely spoils their appearance and makes them look quite sad and forlorn. There are sprays about such as Nimrod-T, Rose Cl
              ear and Systane that can put things right, if treated when the first signs of trouble appear. I've heard that fuchsia can also get vine weevil but I've never seen this, or them, on any of my plants. My fuchsia are about 60-70cm tall, some maybe a little more. There are other bush varieties that can reach upwards to 3.5m and are even suitable as a hedge. One that is very hardy is called 'Riccartonnii', or Ricky to his friends, and then there is 'Macrostemma' more commonly known as 'Lady's Ear-drops'. I'm sure you don't want to be bored with a long list of other fancy names but I felt the urge to show off a little. Yes, fuchsia are one of my favourite flowers. I may not look after them as per 'the book' or follow the experts advice but I do give them my love and attention and they respond accordingly. It seems to work. After all, it's what most of us want - so why should plants be any different? If you should wish to seek out wet and wild fuchsia, living as nature intended, you'll need to hop on a plane to the lower wooded foothills of Central and South America. One last thing, get it right: Fuchs is pronounced Fooks, for fooks sake. ;-> Kay

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                12.01.2002 19:26
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                If you;re not sure if your fuchsias are hardy enough play safe and lift them now.There are various ways to store plants.Cover them and keep them in a greenhouse,shed or garage,or bring them indoors to a cool conservetory or sun lounge.keep them on the dry side,but doe;nt allow them to dry out completly.You can even keep the plants out in the garden all winter if you bury them in the soil.Look for a well drained, sheltered spot and dig a hole at least 18ins deep.Line the base of the hole with some straw, then lie the plants down inside it.Cover with some more straw,then replace the soil,till the plants are 9-12ins deep.

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                  06.10.2001 02:53
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                  You won't like me, not many do Some people have even threatened to sue But one things for sure and I’m hear to stay Like it or not, I won't go away So abuse me and use me all that you can Some people hate me, to others I'm the man I write crap opinions some people may cry Well the simple truth is that facts don’t lie So to the not useful now goes your click Thinking "what the hell this guy is thick" "what is he doing out here on the loose" to which i reply my names ARTHUR GOOSE Nobody likes me and I don’t really care I'm not considerate and I'm not at all fair I live by my rules and I do what I please And unbelievably my actions won't cease Why wont they block him the majority say And then forever he will go away But they do not want to, they still want me here For somebody to shout at and yell in their ear My opinions are different, some ay unique Its a shame that the outlook for this account is bleak I'm sure some of you like me and like what I do After all I'm just another comedian-like you. So now off you go the the dooyoo police To say "another mental patient has been let of his lease" Sure enough the will lock me and laugh out in glee Who victors in this battle will be interesting to see. No doubt you are bored now of my song I do apologise but it will not take long There is a choice of phrases to use To accompy this kind and sort of abuse Arthur we love you, Arthur please stay Or Arthur piss off and go away Either way you have seen me and experienced my views At this rate I'll star on the 9 o clock news! Well as you can see I'm addicted I always want to come back but I have to wait till the weekend when dooyoo police are off my back
                  You rate all my opinions not useful but I really couldn't care less you all comment and abuse me and most of you get in a stress. But I am hear to stay and thats all there is to it and the last thing I have to say is that all my opinions are shit! I thank my fans.

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                  06.10.2001 02:52
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                  MAGELLANICA AUREA, Grown for its lovely yellow tiered foliage, which goes gold & red in the full sun.The flowers have long tubes of red & purple sepals(dainty)from June to Oct. One of the lower growing ones 2/3ft. This group of hardy fuchsia,s are the hardiest, going as low as -10 if the site is perfect i.e well-drained, not exposed!! A good- site is a must, as they will last for many years if attention is paid to the depth of planting & the soil.(not to dry) Benefits from some organic matter/peat dug into flower-beds .Full sun/Partial Shade. Tips;If they are to get through our long wet Winters & wind-chills of -10 plus, they must be buried deep at least 3-4 inches than they were in the pots!! Really good value from 80p sml-2.99p large. If you cant afford nursery prices then try your local markets or car-boots!! GREEN -GODDESS..OCT 5TH..7.57pm

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                • Product Details

                  Fuchsia is a genus of flowering plants, mostly shrubs, which were identified by Charles Plumier in the late 17th century, and named by Plumier in 1703 after the German botanist Leonhart Fuchs (1501–1566). The English vernacular name Fuchsia is the same as the scientific name. There are about 100–110 species of Fuchsia. The great majority are native to South America, but with a few occurring north through Central America to Mexico, and also several on New Zealand, and Tahiti. One species, Fuchsia magellanica, extends as far as the southern tip of South America on Tierra del Fuego in the cool temperate zone, but the majority are tropical or subtropical. Most fuchsias are shrubs from 0.2–4 m tall, but one New Zealand species, Kotukutuku (Fuchsia excorticata), is unusual in the genus in being a tree, growing up to 12–15 m tall.