Welcome! Log in or Register

Honeysuckle

  • image
£7.00 Best Offer by: secretsales.com See more offers
6 Reviews

Oval mid-green leaves with bluish undersides and very fragrant tubular deep purple flowers. Honeysuckles are arching shrubs or twining vines in the family Caprifoliaceae, native to the Northern Hemisphere. There are about 180 species of honeysuckle, with by far the greatest diversity in China, where over 100 species occur; by comparison, Europe and North America have only about 20 native species each. Widely known species include Lonicera periclymenum (European Honeysuckle or Woodbine), Lonicera japonica (Japanese Honeysuckle, White Honeysuckle, or Chinese Honeysuckle) and Lonicera sempervirens (Coral Honeysuckle, Trumpet Honeysuckle, or Woodbine Honeysuckle). Hummingbirds are attracted to these plants.

  • Sort by:

    * Prices may differ from that shown

    More Offers
  • Write a review >
    How do you rate the product overall? Rate it out of five by clicking on one of the hearts.
    What are the advantages and disadvantages? Use up to 10 bullet points.
    Write your reviews in your own words. 250 to 500 words
    Number of words:
    Write a concise and readable conclusion. The conclusion is also the title of the review.
    Number of words:
    Write your email adress here Write your email adress

    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    6 Reviews
    Sort by:
    • More +
      10.03.2004 16:16
      Very helpful
      (Rating)
      6 Comments

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      Yes it's spring again and the weather is going to get a lot warmer, now is the time to get back into your garden and one of my favorite plants in the garden is the honeysuckle. Honeysuckle is a great climbing plant often it is taken for granted a hedgerow plant but in a garden it can be a beautiful feature. The scent of the honeysuckle is loverly a powerful scent which can send you dreaming into thoughts of picnics and walks in the country, it's a relaxing scent and I think a must for all gardens. Not only does it attract the honey bees, it also brightens up a garden with it's loverly colour and fragrance. Honeysuckle can be grow in most parts of the garden. They prefer a nice sunny place but can be grown in the shade too. Although this is a lot harder to get them to take root. You can buy honeysuckle plants in any garden centre and this way you can grow them in pots until they reach a good size, large enough to be able to plant where you want them in your garden. You will probably pay anything from £2.00 upwards for a plant, like all garden centre's they charge different prices for the size of the plant. I'm lucky enough to have a gazebo where the honeysuckle has taken root around one of the posts and is now half way up it wrapped around the post, this year it may well reach the top and then I can train it to go over the roof to meet up with the clematis which has already spread to the roof. When you plant a new honeysuckle plant you need to feed it to encourage stem growth. This can be done by feeding it plenty of nitrogen and phosphorus, these again can be bought in a packet at the gareden center. An organic feeder of blood, fish and meal can also be bought at the garden center and will help your honeysuckle to produce good strong roots and leaves. When your feeding your new plant always look for weak or dead shoots and prune these off, which will give the new stronger shoots a better c
      hance. Pruning a honeysuckle is very easy you only have to cut it back to the size you want it to be, you don't have to prune it every year, like roses. Just take off any dead stems and clip the tops Honeysuckle is good for growing up tressles, up drain pipes and over fences and other places where you want cover. It can also be grown in with a hedge to add colour to it. The best types of honeysuckle to buy are Lonicera pericly-medium. This one has nice yellow flowers and has a strong scent. it flowers between June and September. L. caprifollium has pinkish flowers and also has a strong scent, this one flowers between June and October. These are the one's I grow in my garden and are my favorite. They can be grown in a moderately rich welll drained soil, they both do well in a light shaded area of the garden and can be planted out in september to march. Well, if your thinking that your garden needs a fresh look and that you'd like a nice scented garden to sit in and read a book, then adding honeysuckle to your would make it such a place. Have a nice day.

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        18.03.2002 18:14
        Very helpful
        (Rating)
        9 Comments

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        Let me introduce you to an excellent plant that will make any garden brighter - and for very little effort n your part. Honeysuckle is a climbing plant - ie it will clamber over anything, given half a chance. It has non-descript green leaves, and lovely flowers - usually some combination of yellow and pinky red. The flowers produce a lovely aroma - which largely gives the plant its name. The sweet smell fills the air around the plant attracting people and insects in equal measure. Where to grow it? Up anything - great for giving some life to a grim wire fence, or for putting up a trellis on a wall of your house. The happily grow on dead wood, so any small dead trees make an excellent home - you can also let it climb over living trees, but you have to prune every year to stop your tree from getting swamped. Obviously, if you have some sort of pergola like construction, you can encourage it over that. Honesuckle grows in the wild (although the odds are if you buy it from the shops it will have been cultivated.) However, its basially a hardy, long suffering sort of plant that can largely look after itself. It likes to see the sun now and then, but can cope with shade - it likes to get some water, but can cope with variations. It will survive hot summers, frosts and agressive pruning. It flowers during the summer, and usually for a good long time. it's much less tempermental than pretty much any other climbing thing I can think of (except for dog roses)and has a much longer period of flowering than most. Other advantages: If you like to be eco friendly now and then, this is a great plant for insects. Bees love it. Where you have insects, you also get wild birds, so you can use it to promote wildlife in your garden. Be warned: In the autumn it produces cute little berries, which while they don't look much like anything you might eat, could attract the attention of small children. it's always worth keeping little people and
        berries apart - I don't believe the honeysuckle puts out anything especially toxic, but its certainly going to give you a poorly tum. I love this plant, even if it does make me sneeze (this must be the perfume because the pollen is insect distributed.) It's so easy to look after, and you get excellent results for very little effort. it is ideal for bringing some vertical elements to small gardens, it is great for covering any sort of eyesore - walls, fences, sheds, etc can all be hidden and turned into luxurious bowers bythis wonderful plant. The smell is gives off is divine, the flowers look really good. it considered to be a touch old fashioned - a plant associated with cottage gardens, but I think this is hardly a reason to ignore it. Foreign exotics may look more dramatic when they flower, but they don't bloom as long or survive as well in our unpredictable climate. If you want a climbing plant, you won't find one better than this.

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
        • More +
          10.06.2001 02:06
          1 Comment

          Advantages

          Disadvantages

          I have a pergola [though it looks more like a bus top so I'm told] with 3 types of honeysuckle growing over it. The best is Halliana [is it one L or two]. This one is semi-evergreen - it looks a bit sad through the Winter. With small white/yellow flowers - it smells wonderfull in the summer, especially after a small [hopefully] bit of rain. Easy to grow - its a must for pergolas and the like. It should be hacked down to the ground every few years - but I've not bothered yet..

          Comments

          Login or register to add comments
          • More +
            04.05.2001 04:27
            Very helpful
            (Rating)
            5 Comments

            Advantages

            Disadvantages

            Although Honeysuckle was born in Europe, it is widely grown throughout the world, especially China. There are also many kinds of species of it. In Europe, the most common kind is 'Lonicera Caprifolium'. It is a climbing shrub, growing to some 4 metres!! It has oval leaves, which grow opposite to each other, and yellow flowers, peppered with a hint of orange or white. The flowers also give way to red berries. I have honeysuckle in my garden, although I'm not sure what species it is! It was already in my garden when I moved in, and has gone from strength to strength! It is pleasantly draped and twisted round my fence, and when flowered in the summer, looks and smells lovely! But in the winter time does look a bit bland. Not only does honeysuckle look lovely, and smell divine, it does have it's medicinal purposes too. It is known to help the following ailments: * Sore throats and gum problems * Asthma (under the supervision of a qualified herbal or medicinal practitioner) * Infections brought on by fever, sore throat and headache * Abscesses or swellings, especially of the breast or throat * Dysentery or painful urinary dysfunction Wow! Isn't that amazing! Okay, so now you're wondering on how exactly do you use honeysuckle for any of the above named. Well, I shall tell you! You use internally as an infusion. 200 ml (8 fl oz) twice daily. You use the infusion as a gargle or mouthwash - again twice a day. The parts used are the flowers and leaves. You can make tea with these parts by boiling the leaves or flowers in water for 10 minutes. The berries are NOT to be used, as they are poisonous. It is said that the leaves are used as a mouthwash for sore throats and gum problems, and the flowers are used in the treatment of asthma, where they relax the airway. I hope I have provided you with enough information about this beautiful plant, and tempted you into b
            uying one!

            Comments

            Login or register to add comments
            • More +
              25.04.2001 15:41
              Very helpful
              (Rating)
              1 Comment

              Advantages

              Disadvantages

              A plant of romance it lures you to the garden to smell its lovely unforgetable scent and bask on its beauty. It climbs on any structure and projects its radiant flowers with grace. Makes a wonderful wedding gift not to be forgotten. Does not require alot of maintenance in the garden. Makes a wonderful hedge and can grow to 12 ft. I find in my own garden it holds its foliage late into the fall. Only one draw back it gives alot of pollen off in the spring, and would pose a problem to people who suffer from allegies.

              Comments

              Login or register to add comments
              • More +
                29.01.2001 00:07
                Very helpful
                (Rating)
                6 Comments

                Advantages

                Disadvantages

                What can be more alluring than the scent of honeysuckle wafting round your garden after a summer shower? A drop of rain always seem to make the scent more pronounced. Not reason enough in itself to wish for rain, of course – we had plenty of that last year. Now many plants have the reputation of being difficult to grow, although this is often more attributable to myth that fact. But even if the colour of your fingers is anything but green, you simply cannot go wrong with honeysuckle. It is so tolerant and undemanding, it could give lessons to this human world. It will tolerate full sun, partial shade, or even (some varieties) full shade. Any soil type will do. It will put up with being too dry, and also being too wet, although not waterlogged. It will survive with no pruning. It will even survive with no feeding. Let’s not get carried away. It will survive in neglect, unlike so many other plants which will give up the ghost. But that’s not to say it likes to be ignored. And a little attention will produce a stronger, healthier plant, and consequently more flowers – which is what it’s all about, after all. So how can we help our new honeysuckle? It will be happier in a site which tends to be drier rather than wetter. Plenty of organic matter at planting time will give it a boost (shrub planting compost, your own garden compost, or good old FYM). A handful of bonemeal in the planting hole will help establishment. Thereafter, feed annually with a balanced fertiliser such as Growmore, and for better flowering, give it an occasional dose of tomato food during the flowering season. Best location for our honeysuckle? Well, it’s a climber, obviously, but not a self-supporting one like ivy. Although the stems will twine around anything in its path, to enable it to hold on, it need tying in to start with. It can be grown up a wall, on trellis. It is ideal growing up and over a garden ar
                ch or pergola. Consider, too, planting it at the base of a mature tree, and letting it climb up through the branches. If you have a large area of shrubs, honeysuckle can be planted among them, without support, and it will spread over the ground through the other plants. Honeysuckles are vigorous growers. In fact, the word rampant springs to mind. So regular pruning is necessary, if for no other reason than to keep the plant within its allotted space. I had the task this autumn of cutting back a honeysuckle whose owners decided it was in need of a prune, when it appeared in the kitchen. Yes, the kitchen. Through a joint it the ceiling. It had grown up the wall outside, under the eaves, into the roofspace, and was now coming through the kitchen ceiling! I would suggest you don’t wait that long to give it a trim. You won’t kill honeysuckle, no matter how hard you cut it back. And if you know nothing about pruning, then simply cut it back to within the space you want it to occupy, every autumn. The only problem with this is that after a few years, all the flowers and foliage will be at the top of the plant, and the lower stems will be bare. To overcome this, cut a few shoots back to within a few inches of the ground every year. New growth will come from the dormant buds beneath your cut, and will give you young growth further down the plant. And if, like me, you are always on the lookout for plants for free, honeysuckle are easy to propagate. Take hardwood cuttings any time from October to March. That is, sections of stem about pencil thickness, with 3 or 4 joints (nodes). Cut cleanly just below, and just above, a node. Make a slit trench somewhere in the garden, preferably in shade. A slit trench simply means shove a spade in to its full depth, and shove it back and forth, to produce a V shaped trench. Fill the slit with sharp sand, or even spent compost will do. Insert the cuttings to about two thirds of their length, and firm th
                e slit closed with your foot. That’s it. Enjoy your garden for the summer. Come back to your cuttings in autumn, lift them carefully, and I’ll bet most will have roots. You can plant them straight out in the garden at this stage, but the may struggle. Better to pot them up in a good potting compost, and grow them on for another season. A sheltered spot outside is fine – a greenhouse is too warm. But don’t forget to water them. By the following autumn you will have plants as good as (or maybe better than) you would buy at the Garden Centre. And finally, varieties. Personally, I like the native honeysuckle, Lonicera periclymenum. Or if you’d rather have something with a little more vigour, or a slightly longer flowering period, the varieties Belgica or Serotina are worth a try. They are both bred from the native. For something a little different, there is an evergreen honeysuckle, Lonicera henryii. It may not be as readily available, but is worth seeking out. So that’s all the work done. Sit back, wait for the summer sunshine, watch the bees feasting on the nectar in your honeysuckle flowers, and smell the honey!

                Comments

                Login or register to add comments