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Kengo - Master of Bushido (PS2)

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3 Reviews
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    3 Reviews
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      25.06.2002 22:05
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      Ever wanted to be a samurai, well now is your chance. Kengo claims to be a realistic samurai expierance, and to be honest (not that i'm a samurai) it isn't. But it is a good game. There are three different types of gameplay: Single Player(story mode) Tornament(arcade) and vs battle. Single player Here you get a choice of three wannabe samurai's they all vary in skill, after you chose a character you then get to choose a dojo, every Dojo has a different skill level too such as a difference in speed, strength and style. Once you are ready you will start with a test match, within which you’ll get your arse totally wupped by a expert samurai, the challenge is to last as long as you can. Once you’ve taken a kicking you’ll have some training options which basicaly show you how to play. Next you are to face a selction of Dojo’s, where you are pitted against the Dojo masters students and then finally the master who if you beat you will take his sword, each Dojo masters sword has a different special move, and as you defeat each Dojo you will learn their special moves. The moves you learn can be linked together to make your own combo’s! Eventually with the right amount of training your character is invited to a “IMPERIAL MATCH!!!” Where you will be given a metal sword to fight with as oppose to the wooden sword you use whilst defeating the Dojo’s. Combo editor The moves you learn whilst fighting can be edited together to make three hit combos, this proves to be very useful as you can customise your attacks to beat the opposing fighters style. Ki Your Ki level symbolises your spped and strength whilst in combat, your Ki meter appears at the bottom of the screen, you can chant to make it go up or pull of a parry, but if you block to much it will go down hence rendering you slow and weak. Tornament mode Basically you get a wide variety of acomplished samur
      ia’s to choose from, with which you will fight as many people as possible. Vs Do I have to explain? Sound The sound to kengo is very minimal there is one song at the title sequence, and form there out there are a few sowrd noises and a lot of yapping dogs in the background, its quite annoying really. I ended up turn the sound of Graphics The graphics are good, very smooth , what else is there to say about graphics? Overall I’ve enjoyed playing kengo, its very fast and quite addictive. Baring a resemblance to the PS1’s ‘Bushido Blade’ but original in its own way. Kengo is worth a buy at fifteen pounds from Asda.

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      16.03.2002 03:11
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      • "not much sound"

      I first became aware of this game while browsing in the shop (Not a good sign, as quality games tend to generate some hype and gather fans on the internet. Kengo obviously hasn't if this is the first opinion). The samurai-style sword fighting concept and its apparent attempt at realism interested me. After reading a few mixed reviews elsewhere on the Internet, I decided to give it a try as it was comparatively cheap and I had some vouchers to spend. The manual is adequate. The game comes on a CD, not a DVD, which always worries me. The title screen has a pleasant enough tune in the background. It seems to be the only music in the game though. At this point there are four options, single player, tournament, two player and options. The options screen contains little worth mentioning. I used it once to turn gore on when I first started playing and don't recall ever going back. Two player is a basic one on one versus match. You can choose the number of rounds and the arena but that's it. Tournament isn't a tournament at all. You pick one of the characters (19 + 3 unlockable + 1 secret + 8 generic "students") and try to beat all the others in turn. The game records how many you beat before you give up and how long it takes you. The bulk of the game is single player mode. You can choose from three characters, then enter one of the eight dojos. Each dojo is owned by a different Master, who teaches his own style of fighting. Complete a few basic training sessions to learn the games controls, then challenge the other students and the Master's Disciple to earn your first "Licensed Katana". This allows you to use the style's special move. You then have to visit the other seven dojos and challenge them in much the same way. Each dojo teaches different techniques and has a different sword to earn. After this you can enter the Imperial Tournament, inherit mastership of your
      dojo, fend off challenges from other characters and revisit the other dojos if you wish. You have to train to improve your stats and you can learn new techniques and put together your own combos. I like the fighting system, which is simple and relies on timing and how well you can judge the range between you and your opponent, rather than how well you can remember and hit button combinations. I liked learning new moves, then seeing how I could combine them with moves from other styles to make new combos. I didn't like the training aspect. Training is done by playing mini-games. The problem is that of the six mini-games, only a couple work in the same way as the main game, the rest are tests of reactions or button hammering ability so they soon got boring. I felt that the way the game progressed was a downside. At first I found the fights too slow and drawn out. As I trained my character and learnt additional moves it got quicker and more fun whilst being a more interesting challenge. However, having won the Imperial Tournament the game just trailed off. There was no real ending and nothing to keep me playing for long, as the desire to learn every move soon gave way to frustration and boredom. I reached a point where I'd trained my character far enough and learnt enough good moves to suddenly make the game seem easy. I don't think the game has much replay value. You might keep playing it for quite a while if you are determined to learn every move and max out your stats, but there's no real reason to. I don't feel that there's any more fun to be had by starting again as a new character, or at a new dojo, as it makes very little difference which one you pick in the first place. I haven't played multiplayer much, but I think it could add quite a bit to the game if you can find a human opponent to play against. I suppose I should mention graphics and sound. The graphics
      are good but not amazing. The sound effects are good but there aren't many of them. Only the ambient sound effects are actually poor, due to their repetitive nature. I would often turn the volume right down and listen to a CD instead. Overall then, I would say that this game was just above average quality. It was fun for a while, but I'm more likely to part exchange it than play it again. Therefore, I wouldn't recommend buying it, but I wouldn't discourage you from renting it if you like the look of it.

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    • More +
      27.03.2001 04:47

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      Kengo: Masters of Bushido is the first next-generation development from Light Weight studios, the development house most known for its Bushido Blade games. The development team is no longer affiliated with Square, the publisher and owner of the Bushido Blade license, and Kengo isn't an official entry into the Bushido Blade series. Still, a remarkably similar premise and gameplay mechanics vaguely reminiscent of Bushido Blade make Kengo an obvious but not official progression of Light Weight's last two games. Kengo has three gameplay modes. The single-player mode has you pick a lowly dojo apprentice and make him into a famous swordsman. The tournament mode has you pick one of the game's 20 characters and fight a seemingly endless string of warriors until you either defeat them all or drop. And the versus mode lets two players battle it out on the field of their choice. The single-player mode is the meat of the game. First you choose one of three budding warriors and one of eight dojos, and then you train your character in the ways of the sword through training minigames and practice lessons with the dojo master. Your fighter's ability is represented by six stats, and these stats can be raised through training and actual fighting. As you complete various forms of your training, new challenges will be opened to you. Eventually you'll beat the master of your own dojo, at which point you'll be able to challenge the other dojos in the game. The game continues in a seemingly endless string of battles and practice sessions and doesn't appear to follow any sort of solid storyline. Unfortunately, the single-player mode boils down to a series of tedious practice battles fought with wooden swords and boring training sessions with repetitive puzzle-game mechanics. There is no actual quest mode in the game - your samurai never leaves home to search for worthy opponents, and he's never given any motivation to fight beyond merely impro
      ving his skills. And while the game's intro sequence shows a weathered swordsman sleeping under the moonlight and fighting ghost warriors, this isn't actually a part of the game. Kengo's gameplay is a drastic departure from the Bushido Blade formula. Light Weight has abandoned the multiple weapons of Bushido Blade, and each fighter in Kengo uses a basic katana. Additionally, the stance and combo systems have been completely changed. As your character progresses through the game you'll learn new sword techniques. These moves can be strung together to form three-move combination attacks. You can edit your sword combos between matches, and you can store up to 16 different combinations. Each combination is activated when you change your stance and is initiated when you hit the attack button three times while in the appropriate stance. While this system lets you customize your combo attacks, it forces you to use your combos as your primary form of attack. As such, the battles in Kengo consist of button mashing, not the strategic attack and counterattack moves of the Bushido Blade series.

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