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Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time (PS2)

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  • Dodgy camera a times
  • Lack of bosses
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      17.10.2012 22:21
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      Fantasy gaming of the highest class

      Prince of Persia Frustration Minimisers:

      1) Drinking water will completely replenish your energy.

      2) A sand vortex will completely restore your sand reserves, and give you a little extra capacity to boot.

      3) After each major section (a fight, puzzle or acrobatic manoeuvre), you can almost guarantee there will be some water and a sand vortex to reward your efforts.

      4) The Dagger of Time... Reverse mistakes; freeze enemies; slow down time during combat. What would you do without the pointy little fella?

      5) In the unlikely event of irreversible death, you return not to the last save point, but to the last cut-scene. All the above make for an enjoyable, non-frustrating game. We want challenge, but we don't want to have to keep re-doing the same bit. Game designers, think on!

      So what's it all about? There's jumping, swinging, shimmying, block-shoving, switch-pushing, lever-pulling, and all manner of limb-hewing death traps to leap over, circumvent and roll under. Standard platformy stuff, reminiscent of Tomb Raider at its most platformy, but presented with such style and grace. The fluid acrobatics of the Prince far surpass anything Lara could even dream of. The effortless way he runs along walls, swings around poles and leaps between pillars, and the ease with which these actions are performed, make much of this game like virtual ballet, rather than the sub-Raider clone it could have been.

      Then there's the fighting. Pretty straightforward hack'n'slash, but time manipulation makes things more interesting (see point 4) above). And as the game progresses, you can't just get away with wildly swinging and hoping for the best. You need to make tactical use of block and counter-attack, and time those vital "Retrieves" (sucking the sand from fallen foes) so you don't get hacked to pieces in the process. And then there's the skimpily-dressed, bow-weilding maiden, who needs rescuing at regular intervals.

      A platformy, fighty, puzzly action-adventure, then. Nothing, in essence, that hasn't been done before. But never with such class, attention to detail and wrapped in such a beautiful package. The action is set in and around an Arabian palace, which doesn't allow for an awful lot of variety in the environments. But with a palace as beautiful as this, who needs variety? The scale is magnificent. The architecture is solid and authentic. The well-crafted level design is a happy blend of acrobatics, combat and puzzling. And the subtle details, such as light streaming in from a window, eddies of whirling sand at your feet and sparkling, exotic waterfalls, increase the authenticity of the experience.

      However, there are no guns, explosions or busty babes (although the male gamers amongst you might find it difficult to keep your eyes off the delectable Farah - the aforementioned skimpily-dressed, bow-weilding maiden). But come on, people, give the Prince a chance! This is fantasy gaming of the highest class.

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      24.07.2010 23:32
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      A must play. Absolutely brilliant.

      Prince of Persia: sands of time, is a platformer for the PS2. The gameplay revolved around gravity-defying, Parkour-style, free-running platforming, allowing you to run along and up walls, in rder to climb high up and avoid murderous traps. Due to the likelihood of dieing repeatedly, time-reversing mechanics where introduced via the "dagger of time." The game also involved sword-fighting with sand zombies in a huge arabian palace, and it is, simply one of the best games ever made.

      The story revloves around the Prince (his name is never revealed) who accidently unleashed the "sands of time" from a magic hourglass, which has transformed everyone in a huge palace into a villain. The prince tries to do this, despite oppoesition from the sinister Vizier, who wants to use the hourglass and its magic to achieve total power. The story is presented very much like "Laurence of Arabia," Our prince even has a Errol Flynn-esque British accent. The story is brilliantly told through dialogue between characters, narration from the prince, and soliloques from the princes mind. The prince is a complex character, who grows throughout the story, along with his growing love for Princess Farah.

      But in video games, a story welltold is nothing without engaging gameplay (and vice-versa). Thankfully, the platforming sections of the game are fantastic. They are experimental, huge in scale and complex, but the free-running gives you a strong sense of freedom, making the platforming very engaging. While the platforming itself is challengin, it is helped by tight, simple controls. the Prince's acrobats are accomplished just the joystick and two buttons. Minimising the potential inputs makes the game more immersive, and thus enjoyable, and the time powers mean that failure is not frustrating, as you can zip right back to the instant before you screwed up.

      However, to balance the fantastic platforming is the boring and repetitive sword-fighting. You fight lots of different enemies, but they all look and feel the same, and most of them are dealt with in exactly the same way. The counter attacks are too fiddly and loose, as its impossible to get the timing, which leaves you with basic sword swipes or bouncing off walls. Its very dull and you just want to get through it quickly so you can enjoy more platforming and story. Although to be fair, voulting over enemies is quite fun and looks brilliant, due to the fantastic camera.

      Camera controls make or break a platformer. Actually, a bad camera can ruin any game. It was one of the main problems I had with Madworld. In PoP, the camera is brilliant. You can have the camera as tight or as far away as you want, and you can switch to a landscape view, to get a sense of scale and where you need to go. During fights, the camera knows to stay where you can see enemies, before switching to a cinematic closeup when you pull off a finished or a cool looking movie. Its one of the few things that improved the combat.

      I loved this game, and it is a shame it took me seven years to get round to playing it. Don't wait any longer, experience it for yourself.

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        04.05.2010 22:25
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        Worth playing!

        Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time was released in November 2003 by Ubisoft, and blew the gaming world apart. An average score of 92% meant that this game was one of the best received ever. The game featured an original story, a good combat system, great graphics, a gripping story, good AI in the enemies and mind boggling puzzles keeping the gaming public entertained for hours on end. None of the sequels to this game ever surpassed this, the original and the best.

        The story follows our hero, you, the Prince who is tricked in to releasing the 'sands of time' with the 'dagger of time' by the enemy, the Vizier. Only the Prince, Farah (the princess of the other kingdom) and the Vizier remain unchanged by the sands, with everyone else becoming monsters. The game follows the Prince trying to undo his mistake.

        The gameplay is both unique and refined, borrowing from many games, but creating something that at the time was totally different. The 'Dagger of Time' provides the Prince with a key aspect of the Gameplay, throughout the game new powers of the dagger are released, usually determining how far back you can go in time, the Prince can use the Dagger to go back in time to either stop him dying or for whatever reason you wish. This skill is limited though, which puts strategy into your reasoning. The game essentially has a variety of enemies to defeat, several bosses, and loads of puzzles, traps and interesting areas to move through. This can be incredibly difficult and frustrating, but it's so addictive that you feel compelled to persevere.

        The graphics are beautiful, and well designed. Considering that this game came out in 2003, I was really, really impressed with this aspect of the game. The animations in the game are really good and the combat system was a breath of fresh air, the acrobatic Prince can seriously take out enemies, but it's the thought that you've got to put in to strategically beat them is really really satisfying.
        ]
        If you still have a PS2 this game is well worth playing. A great game. One of the best I've played. A well deserved 5 stars.

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        06.09.2009 19:39
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        An unchallenging but extremely satisfying game nonetheless

        I have fond memories of playing the Prince of Persia series in its 2D age when I had an Amiga. The thought of a remake made me a little worried that they'd ruin the spirit with a bunch of gimmicks, but I'm happy to report that this outdoes the original game in every way. This is a technical landmark with a genius gameplay engine, and is also visually impressive to boot.

        The visuals are appropriately baroque given the subject matter and setting - character animations, especially during fighting and the Prince's awesome acrobatics, are superbly rendered. The physics of the jumping elements are in particular very well motion captured, and it's a nice touch that articles of clothing actually sway in the wind as opposed to looking like planks of wood like they used to. The aural design must also be mentioned for its impressiveness - the sound effects are very over the top but in a fun way, making this something resembling a very entertaining B-movie with lavish "set" design. The actual score is fairly rudimentary "lounge"-style atmospheric stuff, but it works within the tone and mood of the game, so won't get any criticism from me!

        The premise involves The Prince fighting to gain his father's honour by discovering a magic dagger that is able to control time. However, the whole mess gets very complicated when he is tricked by a Vizier into unlocking the Sands of Time, which may ultimately result in the end of existence if they get into the wrong hands. Thus, The Prince endeavours to get them back, and quickly, you come across the time dagger, allowing you to correct yourself if you get into trouble - for instance, if you mis-time or mis-judge a fall, you can simply rewind with the trigger button and attempt the jump again.

        This is an immensely fun game that's got a wealth of features, and although rather short, and not terribly challenging, is so fresh and exciting that I don't really care! It's a given that a game which centers around something that allows you to correct yourself is going to be pretty easy, but the fact that the game remembers your movements is mind-blowing to me - I'm astounded at how this technology was implemented - it's very clever indeed. It will also allow you to freeze enemies, and even fastforward time a little bit. On the other side of the coin, though, your luck will eventually run out, as you have to collect sand to be able to rewind time.

        This is clever and original gaming that should be played by everyone who wants a smart outing along with their action and acrobatics.

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        23.08.2009 15:28
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        Very enjoyable. Would recommend to most gamers

        I recently picked up a copy of Prince of Persia: Sands of Time, and I've really been enjoying playing it. It has a good mix of brain teasing puzzles and challenging combat which means the game rarely (if ever) becomes repetitive.

        The plot of the game can more or less be summed up as: Prince make big mess, Prince try to fix big mess. Fortunately (or unfortunately, for him) it's not quite as simple as that, and there are lots of rooms to puzzle and fight you way through before that can happen.

        Personally I enjoy the puzzles the most. They are engaging and challenging, almost to the point of frustration at times. Some of them are extremely brain teasing, and you can run around in circles for ages before being able to spot what you have to do. Other times it is blindingly obvious what you have to do but through various circumstances you can't get there/do what you need to. When you do complete a puzzle and move on to the next section there is a great sense of satisfaction to be had.

        Combat for me is my least favourite part of the game. Early on it is very simple and you can rely on having lots of water around to restore your health, but as the game progresses the enemies get harder and you really have to master various combos and wall attacks in order to beat them. This is something I haven't managed to do yet, so I find combat a hard slog and not too enjoyable.

        Through much of the game you are paired with the non player character Farrah as your assistant of sorts. I found her annoying and more bother than she was of use. She gets in your way during combat and dies at inappropriate moments because she can't defend herself when you're bogged down fighting five big brutes with massive hammers. She's armed with a bow, but seems to not use it to help you out a lot of the time.

        The most notable feature of this game is the Dagger of Time, which you acquire early in the game. With this you can slow down time, see the future, freeze the present, and most importantly, reverse time is you mess up. This feature is particularly useful during the puzzles if you miss a ledge or jump at the wrong moment. I don't tend to use it during combat because if I do, I find myself rewinding time eight times only to meet the same end every time.

        One of the things I was most surprised at was the quality of the graphics. Considering it is a Playstation 2 game released in 2003 I feel they've aged really well. At times they look and feel almost comparable to the graphics in some Xbox 360 games. They have a realistic feel to them, without compromising the fantasy element.

        Sound wise I ave found that you don't really lose much of the storyline aspect if you play on silent. The princes voice can get annoying, especially when/if you die and he goes 'no no silly me, the story doesn't happen like that'.

        Generally speaking I have found this a very enjoyable game to play, with it best selling points being the puzzle aspect of gameplay and the ability to rewind time.

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        22.08.2009 18:34
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        Stands up to the test of time, has high re-playability and is still fun, despite its niggling flaws.

        I received this game free as part of a bundle package when I bought my PS2, oh so many years ago. It was in fact the reason I went for that particular bundle.

        I played the original PC game in my childhood, and this version is a great update! Gone are the sidescrolling 2D exploration and the fetching white pyjamas - now the Prince's surroundings are rendered in luscious 3D with graphics that don't seem to have dated much at out. The plot has been elevated beyond the meagre rescue-the-princess standards of the original, too; now the Prince's quest is to use his Dagger of Time to undo the horrible mess he has caused by foolishly listening to the evil Vizier (if the Arabian Nights has taught us one thing, it's never to trust a Vizier!).

        Control is simple enough, as there's an excellent movement and combat tutorial at the beginning of the game. The Prince is adept at pulling off lots of swanky moves like flipping and wall-running, and you'll make use of all of them as you navigate the perilous terrain and deadly traps.

        The puzzles are stimulating, and there's a real sense of achievement when you successfully complete one. The combat is fairly simple, which is a bonus point for me as I've never been especially good at combat-heavy games.

        It's not all positive, though. The camera control is often a little annoying, and it's sometimes difficult to tell which way you're lined up when jumping from column to column, which irritatingly often leads to a long drop and some horrific crunching noises. Of course, that's where the genuine selling-point of the game comes in.

        The then-revolutionary time-control part of the game is an excellent addition. Just jumped into a vast cavern because you were facing entirely the wrong way? Wind back time. Spent too long figuring out how to avoid traps on the way to a slowly closing door? Slow down time. It's excellent, though you'll rely heavily on it because you'll find yourself plunging to your death quite often.

        The only other down point is that the character of Farrah, though endearingly sarcastic, is almost beyond useless as a sidekick. Rubbish in battle and only able to act in certain situations, you'll find yourself shouting at her more often than not.

        That said, the fun that can be gained from the game far outweighs the frustration, and I've played it through at least 3 times. Well recommended or all who like to think a little bit while playing their games.

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        14.08.2009 22:19
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        Great game.

        Prince of Persia the Sands of Time is an action game for the Playstation 2 devloped by Ubisoft.

        The games story follows the Prince as he is tricked by the evil Vizier to release the Sands of Time which wreaks havoc among the Kingdom turning everyone into mosters, apart from the Prince and Princess Farah who have magical objects which protected them. The Prince must journey to collect the Sands of Time and lock them back into the hourglass of time to restore the Kingdom to its original state. The story is really well told and the relationship between the Prince and Farah is a really touching sideplot.

        Gameplay in this game consists of platforming and combat sequences. The prince is a really agile character and can run up walls and leap around with extreme skill, the game has lots of tricky jumps and puzzles for you to explore and solve so you will be grateful for the princes moves. Combat is rather basic, the prince is equipped with a sword and his agility again comes into play as he can leap around and hack at enemies while dodging blows and leaping over them to perform some finishing moves.

        The game does have some tricky pitfalls to over come and enemies can often overwhelm the prince, this is where the Princes Dagger of Time comes into play, he can use the powers of the dagger to rewind time to his advantage, this is a really cool mechanic and can save you from the dangers of the game though it only works for a limited time. A bit annoying say if you fell down a pit and rewind but only have enough sand to make it just to the top! You can get more sands of time by defeating foes in the game though so you are usually quite well stocked.

        Graphically the game is a little lacking in finer details but the animations from the Prince are superb really bringing the character to life.

        Prince of Persia and the Sands of Time is a brilliant game that should not be missed, it combines a good story and excellent gameplay.

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        05.08.2009 20:11
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        Great game

        After a poor 1999 3-D instalment in the Prince of Persia series, the franchise's future was in doubt. Years later, Ubi-Soft Montreal attempted to update the original game's Persian decor and tightly constructed environmental puzzles for the then current gen console generation. Their editor-in-chief claimed their collaboration with series creator, Jordan Mechner, would "breathe new life into the action/adventure genre" with its "rich characters, white-knuckle action and a plot with more twists than the exotic, elaborate castle featured in the game";even going so far as to bill it "the next masterpiece from our world-famous Montreal studio.", a questionable statement when the nearest to a "masterpiece" they had produced were the Tom Clancy influenced Splinter Cell and Rainbow Six games. Despite the promise of Mechner's involvement, the statement was easily dismissed as the usual hyperbole fed to the press. Did Ubi Soft Montreal really have a masterpiece on their hands in their 2003 platformer, The Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time?

        The first signs are good. While no groundbreaking features such as the original's rotoscoping are introduced, the game looks great. There's a haziness to the graphics which adds to the feeling of being in a desert, and when combined with the bright, medieval Asian environments, builds up a mystical atmosphere. Cartoonish character models jar slightly against the realistic appearance of the architecture but the inconsistency isn't a big issue. The Prince's excellent animations helps draw the player into the game, as he convincingly enacts the player's commands in a graceful manner, almost making his acrobatics look possible. Other character models are done well, but the Prince is the focus of attention. Occasional slow-down occurs when the game gets carried away with enemy spawning, apart from that the game performs well.

        The story is narrated by the Prince, who often draws attention to that fact by cutting in with wry remarks during cut-scenes and gameplay. He tells a story starting from when his father, the king of Persia, had lead an invasion of India for honour and glory (and not at all for the Majarajah's famed treasure vaults). Seeking the same for himself, the Prince separated from the main force during the invasion so he could slip in and pocket the legendary Dagger of Time, thoughtfully leaving the equally revered but much heavier Hourglass of Time for the common soldiers to share in the glory and chronic back pain. Upon his return he is celebrated for his tutorial level exploits before going on to meet the Sultan of Azad. In Azad, the transparently treacherous Vizier (is there any other kind?) tricks The Prince into releasing the Sands of Time from the Hourglass, which once unleashed turned all in the Sultan's vast palace into sand zombies except the Prince, the captive princess Farah and the Vizier. The Prince fled from the Vizier, teamed up with the princess and the game begins as they try to undo the damage.

        The fantastical air of the plot is complimented by the character's mostly light-hearted mood. Cut scenes are brief, and often aren't even plot related, mostly just panning over new areas to provide an overview of the new obstacles the player must overcome. There's no real narrative arc, and the plot it only becomes a factor at the beginning and end of the game. After the initial catastrophe, the pair keep moving forwards, stumbling into occasional incidents until they get swept up in a sudden, climatic rush of momentum that had been entirely absent up until that point. The plot has clever moments, and perhaps I'm just too used to story driven games but I'd rather not have plot advancement completely abandoned after the first hour. The Prince and Farah's developing relationship is interesting, but it's not quite enough to pull the player forwards.

        It's a more dynamic relationship than is the norm in games, and while it lacks ICO's emotional clout, it's entertaining, if uninspired in terms of gameplay; rarely devolving into an escort mission despite Farah's vulnerability. Their initial distrust soon develops into more favourable feelings for each other, but they carry on bickering, their conversation being a source of humour and character interest. They don't talk so much to become annoying, if anything there's no enough of their dialogue. Details like the way she gasps if the Prince loses his footing reinforce make their relationship seem more convincing, although there aren't enough touches like that. Unfortunately, apart from the excellent characterisation, she is just a standard NPC: prone to engaging in traditional activities like opening doors, passing through cracks barely large enough to accommodate her svelte figure, getting mobbed by enemies and accidentally shooting her ally. She's a fine companion, but not used as effectively as she could have been.

        Farah isn't the only plot detail with a large impact on the gameplay. While the Prince's acrobatic dexterity isn't explained, at least his ability to manipulate time is by the Dagger of Time. It gives him a limited ability to rewind time and freeze one or many enemies, while also being the weapon capable of truly destroying a sand zombie; they can be knocked down eventually with his scimitar, but unless the sand is extracted by the Dagger, they soon get back up. The rewind ability makes the game much easier for players, and is welcome in a genre where poor judgement can often lead to instant death, even if they are never too far from a checkpoint. The Dagger also adds depth to the combat. There are no time-bending puzzles as in Braid, but the mechanic is more than a gimmick and prevents the game from becoming aggravating (usually) giving the player some freedom to experiment rather than forced them to replay sections of the game after every misjudged leap.

        And the Prince will be making a lot of leaps in the game as he explores the Sultan's vast, precariously constructed palace. Sands of Time carries on the series' aspirations of being a more realistic kind of platformer; the Prince is somewhat weightier than other platforming stars, only capable of a modest jump which Italian plumbers and spunky anthropomorphic animals would sneer at. He's still a very lithe figure who is a joy to command with the responsive controls. Watching him swing from poles, run along walls and tiptoe along balance beams is almost a good to watch as it is to play. However, no matter how demanding the acrobatics look, they are usually quite easy to perform; all environments are designed so the player can easily overcome them once they've determined the correct approach. The game always makes the effort to help the player out, in ways that go beyond the time rewind feature: the overview of each new area, the camera's initial position directing the player in the right direction, the availability of a landscape view and the "visions" which goes as far as to show the player exactly which actions they need to perform. More help than is necessary is given, as the puzzles are simple, and the extremely self contained, linear nature of the environments means the solution should be stumbled upon soon. Even the more Zelda-esque puzzles involving putting blocks on switches and directing light with mirrors are never challenging. The ease of progression helps streamline the game and keeps things going at a smooth pace. Although this can all come to an abrupt halt the moment the player gets in a fight.

        There's nothing fundamentally wrong with the combat. It's smooth and engaging but relatively restricted and becomes boring compared to the core gameplay. Some of the Prince's moves are available, he can propel himself over belligerent sand-zombies to strike from behind, or dodge roll, and has an impressive aptitude to combat, given an even greater advantage by his recently acquired time-manipulation powers. So what holds it back? The small pool of different enemy archetypes, combined with the ever increasing numbers of them could be part of the problem as there is little variety or tactical scope to the fights. Farah's vulnerability is another irritating factor, as it's not always possible to save her (even after rewinding time) and she has the same lemming-like self-preservation skills of the average NPC. The main factor that put me off was the pacing. While it's fluid at the start and end of the game, fights tend to devolve to a strange standoff as the player waits for the first sluggish enemy to drop their guard before striking. The flow of the combat was too erratic, and not particularly challenging except when defending the incumbent companion.

        But the combat is the only contentious part of the game. The sound is good, although there's disappointingly little music in-game. Occasional rock tracks with a Persian twang or more traditional scores play during battles; the vocal tracks standing out in particular. While repetition of constantly looping tracks is avoided, a little more music would have been welcome. A wariness of overexposure is an attitude that seems endemic in the game, demonstrated by the brief cutscenes, the quite small amount of dialogue and the constant onslaught of new areas.

        The few voice actors are decent, snugly fitting into that special category of "good for a game". They don't embarrass the studio that hired them, and mostly do justice to their respective characters. The Prince in particular easily could have been an irritating character with his petulant manner and royal airs, but he's saved by the excellent writing and the restraint of his VA. He has enough humility to acknowledge his mistakes, and treats his situation with an appropriate levity without dwelling on it and dragging the mood of the game down. He develops while still remaining a mostly sympathetic character, and is never too glum to resist a sarcastic comment. The light-hearted characters provide the main narrative interest and help keep the game going, so it was important that the voice actors did a good job with them.

        Sands of Time is a fairly light-hearted, player friendly, intuitive platformer set in relatively fresh setting. There is little replay incentive due to the very restricted environments and lack of collectibles; although there are a couple of minor extras available from the main menu. The combat is likely to be the only cause of frustration in the game, while also being the only chance of encountering a challenge due to the very shallow learning curve. While there's not much replay value given the lack of collectibles, scope for exploration or many bonuses: the tightly constructed levels, frustration alleviating mechanics, fantastic aesthetic and enchanting world cement its place as one of the best games of its kind for its generation.

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        26.08.2008 22:49
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        An average game, worth a play for the right price.

        Prince Of Persia: The Sands Of Time is the third person action game released in 2003, and is the first of in a series of three games.

        After defeating the maharajah of India, the son of the Mighty king Shahraman, the prince of Persia, finds the hourglass of time and the illustrious dagger of time. When the Prince of Persia unlocks the hourglass of time, the sands destroy the kingdom and turn all living creatures into monstrous sand creatures. Only three people have resisted the sands effect, due to their magic possessions:
        The prince- The dagger

        The vizier- His staff

        Princes Farah- Her bow

        He realizes that the only way to reverse the consequences of his actions is to find the hourglass, and place the dagger back into it, locking the sands back in. Journeying with the mysterious Princess Farah, the prince makes his way up the castle, towards the hourglass. You must use the Prince's athletic prowess to climb up the tower, swinging from bars, running across walls, hanging onto ledges, solving puzzles on the way. You must also fight the sand creatures. This has to be my most favourite aspect of the game, as you can do back flips to get away from enemies, use quick combos to kill them and use the different powers the 'dagger of time' has to offer. These powers are

        The power to rewind- allows you to undo mistakes, even your own death by traveling back in time by up to 10 seconds.

        The power of delay- Slows down time for everything around you, giving you slight edge in combat

        The power to freeze- Stops time for a targeted enemy.

        The power of Haste- Stops time for the entire world, allowing you to dispatch every enemy

        The power of destiny- View visions of the future to help you find your way

        The levels can become quite repetitive, as it is the same over and over again, acrobatics, puzzles, combat, over ad over, but what I can't work out is how unbelievably addictive it is. Many times whilst playing this game I said to my self, 'Right, I've had enough, it' the same over and over again' but within half an hour I'd be right back on it trying to progress further.

        The graphics are ok, considering the game was brought out in 2003, but the speech is extremely cheesy, which is quite annoying. Another problem was that I completed this game in one weekend, mind you I did play pretty much constantly. Saying that, however, the game play is good, and is quite addictive. I'd recommend this game, as long as you could pick it up cheap, don't pay more than twenty pound for it.

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        07.09.2007 08:43
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        Well PoP the bottle, this game rocks!

        Tomb Raider, Marc Ecko’s Getting Up and other games like these all have acrobatics in them. Who do you think invented games like these? Prince of Persia. Starting as a 2D arcade classic, this isn’t the first time the game has gone 3D, but it’s the first successful time it has. In 2003, Ubisoft released Sands of Time, one of the best action adventure games on the PS2. It looks fantastic, sounds great, plays perfectly, and has a well told story as well as controls responsively. I just wish they’d released a next-gen version-unless you count Assassin’s Creed, which though isn’t a sequel is a lot like the PoP games.

        -(The Story)-
        You’ll take the role of the Prince, who tries to gain honour and glory as well as the approval of his farther by stealing this dagger of time. Sadly, it’s a plan gone wrong as when he unknowingly unleashes the sands of time, creates a load of hellish creatures and turns the place into chaos, he can’t get his approval of his father as his father is trying to kill him! So, it’s up to him, and a girl in red called Farah to save the palace and stop the creatures. The plot is interesting, and it’s also well told. The Prince narrates the whole thing, and it feels like a storybook and is great.

        -(The Controls)-
        Usually with a game like this, the controls aren’t responsive and they mess up the whole thing. Thankfully, Sands of Time is different. The controls are responsive, and the fact that you can pull off insane stunts so easily is excellent. Basically, you move around with the left analog stick, control the camera with the other. The X button makes you jump/roll, the square button slashes your sword, the triangle button slashes your dagger of time and the circle button drops you from ledges. You can use sand abilities with the L1 button, L2 moves the camera into a prospective where you can see the whole environment and R2 puts you into a first person view. The controls are simple, but what makes them so fantastic is that they’re so responsive. In some games, it may be ok if a game takes a second to respond, but here when timing is a key that is not allowed. And that isn’t the case, thankfully.

        -(The Gameplay)-
        The game consists of three gameplay types, which are platforming, combat and puzzle solving. All these gameplay types are well executed, and it adds some great variety to the game. That said, the game would be remarkable if the game was simply consisted of the platforming, as the acrobatics in the game are amazing. Yet, the game feels more cohesive with the fighting and puzzle solving, as simply wall running, jumping over traps and doing death defying leaps can get old. Sadly, the game really isn’t too challenging. Thanks to the easy controls, lack of challenge the enemies appose and the easiness of avoiding the deathtraps means you may get bored at times. Still, the game is still exciting, thanks to the dangerous traps. The game also creates a fantastic sense of height. If you’re about 20ft in the air, you can tell as it’s pretty foggy as you look down, not because of poor draw distance, but because you’re so high! Anyways, it’s pretty exciting if you try to jump across, as you think ‘god that’s far too jump, will he make it?’ and when you try to jump it’s so tense as you could fall to your death. And if he makes it, you feel a sense of relief as you’ve made it!

        The acrobats are really exciting. Basically, Prince can roll, wall run, balance on poles and hang onto ledges. At the beginning of the game the acrobatics aren’t too crazy at the beginning, as you’re usually just wall running over spikes or jumping from ledge to ledge, but as you progress the stunts can be downright ridiculous. You’ll be jumping from one ledge to another over a 20ft drop and other things as crazy as this. It’s a shame that if you’re too high, you can die instantly, which is a pain. Luckily accidental deaths don’t occur much. If you happen to fall off while balancing across a pole, Prince will grab the ledge before he drops, which is helpful. Getting into the most accurate position isn’t a problem either, as if you’re a little bit away from the pole; you can usually jump to the pole from that position. Prince can also do other moves like wall jumps, where you jump between two close walls to go higher, and climb ladders. The game is really enjoyable with its acrobatics, as it’s the most occurring thing in the game and is better than the combat and puzzle solving. Yet, the combat and puzzle solving break up the action nicely.

        The combat is, well simplistic. Prince has a nice set of moves on him. He’ll have his three move combo, a move where he stabs his enemies with his dagger and he can also jump over enemies and stab them in the back as well as launch and do a sort of spear move which can take enemies down to the ground instantly. But you can’t simply hit them and expect them to die; you have to do something to kill them. You can do one of two things. You can put the enemy to the ground and then stab the dagger to absorb their sand, and in turn killing them, or you can use a move where you freeze them, and then if you can throw them into the air you can slice them in two! Sadly, the combat isn’t too challenging. There are a couple of scenarios which are a bit hard, where if you don’t use the moves to take them out they can kill you, but the game is mostly a breeze to get through. One thing is that in combat you’re partner Farah will fight with you, but if she dies then its game over. That means you need to protect her from the sand monsters. The game’s monsters don’t make it much more challenging, as they’re slow and rarely attack. They seem to try and crowd you, which can lead to some unfair situations, but they also rarely do that.

        The game’s puzzles are pretty straight forward. They usually involve you simply move crates, flipping switches, figuring out how to use some machinery, stuff generic to the action adventure genre. Yet, there’s something nice the game adds to the puzzles. Basically, with Farah with you sometimes her and Prince will need to work together to complete a puzzle. There’s an example where Prince will first create a path for Farah to get to a switch so she can make a path for you. It was pretty fun. She’s also so skinny (eat a Hot Dog goddamit!) that she can crawl through small holes or slide through small cracks, so she can activate a switch for you. It adds a nice twist to the game, and it will remind people of a legendary game known as ICO. There’s also some puzzle solving by simply finding where you’re meant to go.

        As Prince gets the dagger of time, he can do a number of moves with his dagger. The most used move is the rewind ability. Basically, if you do fall to your death or die in combat, the Prince can usually rewind time to a point before he was about to die, and prevent sudden death. This feature means you won’t die constantly, taking a lot of the challenge out of the game. Still, it’s nice to see the game not being too punishing. One another ability will let him freeze an enemy, so you can chop him in half! Sadly, these all make the game too easy, coupled with the easy combat and acrobatics make this game a little too easy for its own good.

        Still the game is very accessible, meaning even a non-gamer can pick up the game and still enjoy it. Still, the game still deserves its 12+ rating as some of the monster games are a little scary. Very young children will be scared by the monsters, so they should stay clear. Still, I would let maybe a ten year old play the game if they’re not scared easily. The game has a little bit of blood here and there, and there’s a lot of swash buckling action. Plus, a ten year old could pick up and play the game easily thanks to the great learning curve, responsive controls and lack of needed precision.

        -(The Graphics)-
        Graphically, Sands of Time looks brilliant. The character models are fantastic, with nice details and animation. The enemy characters don’t repeat too much, and the main characters are exquisite. There’s some nice CG cutscenes here too, which look drop dead gorgeous. The best thing about the game, though, is the environments. They look incredible. There’s some brilliant lighting work to be found here, with some sun soaked moments. The environments all look excellent, with lots of details and clean textures. You’ll go through exotic gardens, dark dungeons, huge palace halls and more. And the sheer size of the levels can be incredible, they’re sometimes massive. The frame rate stays pretty much smooth throughout, which is incredible considering the size and details.

        -(The Sound)-
        Soundwise, the game also is excellent. The voice acting is great. Prince is perfectly voiced as a young man who is a bit naïve as he does some dumb stuff at the beginning, just to impress his dad. The rest is enjoyable to listen to as well. The music is great too. We’re in Egypt here, so the music will have a sort of Arabian feel to it, so it suits the game. The effects are good too, with the sword slashes, wall cracking and etc. Sadly the game’s sound is undermined by some sloppy recording, as some of the voices are drowned out completely by the effects when they’re saying something important. And sometimes, the voices and effects are done really quietly, so you can’t hear it. Still, the game does sound fantastic.

        -(The Replay Value)-
        This is the weakest area of Sands of Time. The game is way too short. Put it this way, the game is only 7 hours long, which you’ll tell as you play through as I’d only be playing for a couple of hours, and I was already nearly 50% into the game. Replay value? Well there’s the arcade original, which has held up well and is fun, though it’s much harder than the new game so younger or casual gamers may struggle. There’s also a level-remake, which is fun. But, aside from them two things, there’s not much to do after, leaving you wanting more. There are no unlockable costumes, no bonus videos or art pictures or anything like that.

        -(The Score)-
        Controls=10
        Gameplay=10
        Graphics=10
        Sound=9
        Replay Value=6
        Overall Score=9.0

        -(The Ending Comments)-
        Sands of Time is an excellent game, no doubt about it. It plays excellently, looks stunning, sounds excellent and controls responsively. Sadly, the game is too short, lasting about 7 hours. Still, the unlockable bonus of the original PoP should keep you busy for a bit longer. I recommend it to fans of acrobatics (in games that is), fans of action adventures, newer gamers (as the challenge isn’t too high) and people who like games who tell a good story. If you’re scared of heights, hate games like this or want a challenge, as well as a longer game, look somewhere else. And if you’re even interested in playing the other PoP games, play them in order goddamit as you’ll be stumped if you jump straight to the second or third game.

        -(The Extra Info)-
        This game was published and developed by Ubisoft.
        This was released on November 21st, 2003 and is also on the PC, Gamecube, Xbox and GBA.
        You can buy this in the used and new section from £1.79

        Thanks for reading. Stunt 101

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          18.11.2006 00:51
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          A genuine breath of fresh air for the action/adventure genre

          It took the appearance of Prince Of Persia: The Sands Of Time for me to realise how little the traditional, exploration-based action/adventure genre had been represented of late. Indeed, to find the last true classic that fits this description, PlayStation owners would have to rewind as far back as 1997 and Tomb Raider 2 to find a truly top-class adventure in this mould.

          Prince Of Persia (POP: SOT), released in 2003, is something of a 3D homage to the classic eighties platformer of the same name. But beyond settings, swords and spike-pits, this 21st century iteration is very much a new adventure – and one that is unlikely to leave fans (old or new) disappointed.

          Unsurprisingly, you assume control of the Prince; his efforts to gain honour and glory (and the approval of his father) go seriously wrong as his discovery and subsequent use of a mysterious dagger serves to unleash all kinds of hell in the King's palace; the inner and outer facades of which form the majority of the games picturesque locales. For better and worse, the Sands Of Time have been released (as well as a veritable swarm of hellish creatures) and its your job to use them to your advantage; teaming up with the mysterious lady-in-red, Farah; escape the chaos and put things right once more.

          POP: SOT is a bit of a treat. It mixes a host of established, tried-and-tested platform elements and moulds them around a bunch of well-implemented new ideas, to excellent effect.

          The acrobatics and modes of movement at the Prince's disposal are the most immediately impressive aspect of the game; not only can he execute the usual running-jumps, rolls, ladder-climbs and block-pushing attributes that have become a stale of such games, but he can to perform a variety of almost gravity-defying stunts. He can, for a few steps, scale a wall vertically in an attempt to grab high-up ledges, as well as running along walls and even vaulting his way upwards if there are two adjacent walls that are close enough together – Lara Croft would certainly approve. But it isn't all for show – it has clearly given the developers more freedom as to the level-design, and with the Prince's considerable athletic-arsenal at your disposal, you will have to face some of the most vast, well-realised platforming environments seen in years.

          Indeed, Prince of Persia is in its element when showing-off its huge environments. Not since the early Tomb Raider's has a game of this ilk so successfully built a game world to accommodate its central characters new-found freedom of movement. A tap of R2 allows you to switch to a first-person perspective, allowing you to admire the fine attention to detail that each area showcases. By contrast, a tap of L2 reveals an environment in its entirety from a birds-eye view – be it a trap-filled corridor, a gigantic courtyard or a water-cavern, the apparatus and manner in which you need to progress is often evident, just not immediately obvious - there is usually a lot of it, and this is part of the reason the level-design is so impressive. Certain sections can appear bewildering to begin with, but once you've set your foot on the right path, an array of new possibilities arise that you must consider, and the games beautifully clear logic shines through – one little challenge leads to another, and they are often part of a much bigger puzzle or obstacle course. The route of progression as a consequence is somewhat limited, but it's likely you'll be too engrossed to question its linearity.

          The Sands of Time themselves deserve a mention because of how clever their uses are. The Prince has the ability to reverse time by up to ten seconds (provided he has enough sand) – and the chief advantage of this (apart from it looking nifty) in the main body of the game is that if you make a mistake, such as falling from a ledge or misjudging a jump, you can hold L1 to send things back to the point you made the error, and try a different approach. It's genius really; saveing a massive amount of frustration and avoiding making you retrace your steps too often. As well as this, the Sands form save points, whereby you can record your progress, but also watch a short, flash-forward clip that gives you hints at what might lie in wait – though not all of what you are shown is guarenteed to happen, you can glean hints from the images – it's a nice touch.

          The controls are also superb – the Prince's movements are utterly fluid, and he rarely ever suffers from getting snagged on the scenery. The platform-based elements often require dexterity on the part of the player, but by the same token you never feel you have to be overly-concious about lining up a jump right at the edge of a platform. Even with such a variety of moves at your disposal, the nature of the configuration means most abilities can be utilised at the touch of one button (and a direction), and you have to applaud the developers for this – it's all been terrifically thought out.

          The battle-system reveals more of the games 'cool' streak and creative flair, and though it isn't perfect, there's rarely a dull fight. Whilst hammering the standard combo button is enough to down enemies in the early stages, you'll need to learn a few more tactics to take on the tougher beasties, as they become more adept at defending themselves. The Prince can run straight up and over an enemy, slicing them on the way down, or if he is backed against a wall, he can spear his way out of a tight spot. Enemies need to be vanquished with the dagger (usually after knocking them to the floor) to stop them from reanimating, though this also helps refill your sand quota. Depending on the quantity of 'sand' you have in your gauge, you can perform a variety of tricks including slowing-time (very Max Payne-esque), freeze a single enemy, or freeze all enemies – allowing you to make light work of them. The battles are up-tempo and graceful, and require quick thinking and reactions on the part of the player. There are a couple of niggles however – brawls become genuinely quite tough in the latter stages of the adventure, and it isn't uncommon to find four or more enemies targeting you at one time, and as the Prince tends to lock-on to the one that is nearest his position, he does leave himself open to attack on several sides. The difficulty of these sections is often exaggerated by the need to protect Farah, who can't withstand much damage, and has an annoying habit of standing right where the baddies can surround her most easily. But I'm picking at straws somewhat – the fighting system has some genuine innovations to show for itself and for the most part, it is fun.

          Also well-judged is the puzzle element. There's nothing that is overly fiendish or involved as for a start you can't pick up items or keys, though its nice to see the game does take a breather every once in a while to test your grey-matter – usually in the form of moving blocks or mirrors, or turning leavers to reveal something new. A lot of the games 'levels' require you to ascend or descend to or from a great height, and some of POP's greatest (and most satisfying) teasers lie in finding the correct route and sticking to it.

          Visually, it is an absolute work of art. Everything about the game radiates aesthetic quality; from the flawless animations of the Prince and Farah, to the clever battle effects and gorgeous FMV sequences. It's the settings that give POP: SOT the ultimate 'wow' factor however – the scale in particular is absoultely breathtaking. From certain standpoints, the aforementioned first-person camera reveals what feels like miles of landscape, with incredibly pretty structures that technically aren't even part of the playing space – it shows of a host of beautifully sculpted and lovingly-detailed buildings, lush waterfalls and other suitably grand features. The castle-siege section that the game opens with shows parts of the level being destroyed before your eyes, as soldiers can be seen fighting their own private battles with each other. There's a definite sense of grandeur to Prince Of Persia that had not been evident in gaming for quite some time.

          The sound is rather less inspiring than the graphics. Though the voice-acting is okay, it is often too quiet and too mumbled to make out, and this is most evident when the Prince and Farah are exchangeing tips or banter in-game. The Arabian jingles are used sparingly and to solid effect, but are hardly memorable.

          What robs POP: SOT of the 'classic' status it deserves is a mixture of it being too short, and not having any real replay-value. I finished the game first time through in a fairly modest ten hours, but was surprised that the game didn't prompt me to 'save' at the end – it has become something of a tradition for shorter games to allow this so you can start the adventure afresh with bonus weapons, costumes or scenarios. But alas, no – once the end credits roll, The Sands Of Time has little more to offer, beyond unlocking the original 2D game and a secret one-level remake, though both of these can be accessed first time through anyway.

          The 12+ age rating PEGI recommend is about right I think, as there is no excessive blood-letting, limb-severing or other such unsavoury actions, though as the game features its fair share of sword-fighting and creepy underworld inhabitants, it may be best for very young gamers to steer clear. Otherwise, I would encourage all gamers to give it a try.

          Prince Of Persia: The Sands Of Time amalgamates ideas new and old to form an unique and very enjoyable adventure. It looks wonderful, is extremely-cleverly designed and will keep you hooked right to the finish, which regrettably arrives all to quickly. The lack of replay value is a definite disappointment, but as it is now packaged with its two sequels as part of Prince Of Persia Trilogy, it would still have to come recommended in this guise.

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            25.09.2006 17:26
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            Landmark in Action Gaming

            Prince of Persia-The Sands of Time (12+ 1 player)

            Ever since the first Red Orb versions of Prince of Persia (PoP) for the PC, Prince of Persia has been a popular and revolutionary game for its time.

            The first Red Orb PoP contained programming of traps, puzzles and sequences that world had not seen before, not forgetting of course, the first real time sword fighting game.

            After the first two games (2d) Red Orb stopped making Prince of Persia but afew years later they decided to make Prince of Persia 3d which had clunky graphics, a fairly bad combat system and average movement. It didn't catch on well.

            Prince of Persia-The Sands of Time was released in 2003, by Ubisoft (who bought the rights), and was a big hit. The idea of of rewinding time was new to the gaming world. The plot was great and the fighting was unique, despite it being so easy (R1 blocks everything except some bosses). The graphics are purely amazing, especially in the cut scenes. Swordplay is unique and has many different moves you can perform, including different types of movement like wall running and pole climbing, not to mention jumping from walls to plunge a sword into someones heart.
            The AI of the enemies isn't too good because most the time, as you are killing the creatures with your Dagget of time (which must be used as the finisher to suck up their sands), the other creatures do not attack you. A slight flaw in the game.
            The dagger can be used to perform several different powers: Freeze time, Freeze enemy, slow down enemies, rewind time. These enable you to do things such as rewind your death.

            In this game the Prince of Persia begins by using the treacherous Vizier to allow his armies into the castle of the Maharaja, an Indian race, who possess several magical items, one being the Dagger of time and the other being the Hourglass.

            When the Prince and his armies raid the castle he takes the Dagger , and his father, the king takes the hourglass to give as a tribute to his ally. The Vizier tricks the Prince into opening the hourglass and unleashing the sands of time, turning everyone it touches into an evil sand creature, but it doesn't stop there, the sands are spreading from the kingdom on their journey to engulf the world. Only three survive in the palace of Azard (currently the only place affected in the game), the Prince, The wicked Vizier and the mysterious Princess of the Maharaja, Farah.

            The Prince goes on his magical quest to redeem his bad deeds and undo what he has done. He becomes englufed in depression, hate, regret, pity, love and revenge giving this game one of the best storylines i have ever seen/read. Time is one of the best things to set a plot around and Ubisoft have done it perfectly. Even the first speech is immense:
            "Most people think time is like a river that flow swiftly and surely in one direction, but i have seen the face of time and it is like an ocean in a storm; sit down and I shall tell you the greatest story you have ever heard..."
            The ending is even more satisfying but you'll just have to find out for yourself!

            Endulge yourself in this great game and its sequels, PoP:Warrior Within and PoP:The Two Thrones.

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              18.01.2006 21:39
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              A great game that turned to a classic and follow an other 2 stunning PoP games.

              Game Info

              Genre = Action Adventure
              Developer = Ubi Soft
              Publisher = Ubi Soft
              Players = 1
              Age = 12+

              ""When reading this, remember its one i did on 26/09/2004, just had not posted it untill now""
              ---------------------------------------------------------------
              In Prince of Persia you get to play the prince but he's a warrior as well. As the game begins there's a big war going on and you have been ordered by your father to find the magical dagger which lets you control time with it and the owner of this will win the war. So you set off to find it which you find on the first level(The fun now begins)but this then unleashes a big evil. By taking this dagger you turn all the dead into the undead but there fast and very stronger and can only be killed with the dagger unlike zombies or anything.

              So thought the game your trying to find a why to stop this evil forever. The dagger lets the owner of it stop, slow-down and rewind time. So when ever you die with one click of the button you rewind time and then you get to change what you did wrong from being killed my enemies, traps or just falling off a cliff. Don't think that it just puts you back to the jump, it rewinds every move and step in reverse. The other stuff you can do is slow down time so you have time to run under a timed door or stop time to do big combos on multiple enemies. The prince him self is very quick and cool with his moves from running along the walls, to jumping off walls and enemies in attack with his Sword and then use dagger for the final blow.

              The Areas are very shiny with great light effects and very big too. Graphics where the best about in 2003 and still beats most of the games now a year later.

              The music is perfect for the game.

              The controls are easy to get used too. The areas are so big you think how the hell am i going to do this puzzle which some are easy but there a lot off them are hard to work out and do.

              There is very little replay value as there is no unlockables, apart from a the original retro prince of persia game and a 3d level of the first level of that but which Ubi Soft did not finished. (which you need a cheat for)
              ---------------------------------------------------------------
              SCORE

              Graphics - 7/10
              Sound/Music - 9/10
              Controls - 9/10
              Gameplay - 9/10
              Replay Value - 5/10

              FINAL RATING - 7.8/10

              ---------------------------------------------------------------
              Thanks for Reading.

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                18.01.2005 12:10
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                • "Dodgy camera a times"

                The theme you have to watch for within this review is that the gaming press heavily overrates The sands of Time. But that is not to say they are wrong, in fact the 10 hours I spent slamming through the game was not too different to playing a top end Nintendo title. Just a heavily flawed one.

                An evil sultan has spread an evil curse of the sands across his giant palace. Turning those within into zombies, including your own father. With the help of a loving princess you are lead through the palace in an attempt to find the Sultan and hopefully end the terrible curse.

                The game comes in 3 sections, platforming, fighting and puzzling and with platforming being the most dominant I’ll cover this first. Prince of Persia is a game that really does make platforming look cool, leaping from post to post, running across walls, dodging blades and performing Mario style wall jumps. It all looks damn sexy, and bar the odd annoying fixed camera it is easy to use too. The frustration in falling at the most ill conceived of places has been removed by the ability to reverse time. You may have plummeted to your death but with the aid of the dagger of time you can reverse your fortunes and try the fatale leap again. You don’t get the ability to use this in unlimited supplies but it does reduce the amount of silly deaths that you’d normally associate with platfomers. The acrobatic abilities work so excellently with the game and are so easy it almost becomes second nature. Ubi-soft deserves to be commended for such a feat.

                Platforming is also a vital part of the puzzles, which, bar the odd mirror puzzle, are excellently put together and often hardly noticeable. They are never too hard to work out, which is a great help with a game as fast paced as it is. Sadly the battle system isn’t quite up there with the rest of the game. Although the acrobatic style used to kill your opponent are very clever, the implementation of a dodgy camera and the repetitive nature of the fights drag down the entire section. For starters there happens to be just 2 bosses, meaning you are normally fighting traditional zombies or birds and the game literally chucks hundreds at you. It is slightly challenging, in fact the most challenging part of the game, but it is boring, repetitive and highly frustrating. The camera in the game is genuinely pretty bad but this is only noticeable during fighting. Try defeating the tougher zombies when the camera is more interested in the neighbouring wall.

                Couple this with the fact the graphics are not always top of the range and the game lasts a mere 10 hours and you have a heavily overrated game. It is good though, addictive and very enjoyable with an often addition of humour. Also the little “that didn’t happen” when you die and “ do you want me to start the story from here next time” when you save is a very clever idea. The music is also very atmospheric.

                You should own it yes. Just don not expect it to be everything the magazines say it is.

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                  23.08.2004 14:00
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                  • "Lack of bosses"

                  --------Introduction-------- The game was released November 2003 by Ubisoft. It is an action/adventure game where you play as the Prince. The original 8-bit Prince of Persia (PoP) was released in 1989 which was in 2D graphics whereas this modern day version is in 3D. This is the PlayStation 2 review of the game. Certain aspects might vary between this version and the PC or Xbox versions. --------Storyline-------- The Prince is tricked by Vizier into opening the forbidden Hourglass with a dagger which subsequnetly unleashes the Sands of Time onto the Palace. The Sands turn citizens into sand-monsters who provide us with the enemies you encounter throughout the game. The Prince must stop these monsters, as well as defeat Vizier. The Prince must also put his trust in a girl that named Farah, who will assist you throughout the game. The escaped sand is used in the game so as to allow the player to control time. For instance you can slow down time, reverse time (always useful for a second chance on that tricky leap), slow enemies time or even freeze all enemies time (where you go super speed and kill all enemies). --------Gameplay-------- The puzzles are really impressive and very well designed throughout. Push blocks into certain places, push buttons by running up walls, avoid many traps in the game like spikes are all part of the game and puzzles at hand. There is a really responsive control system in this game unlike similar games, most noteable Tomb Raider. It is simple to leap over enemies and strike them with your sword or run across a wall and then leap onto the ladder opposite. Impressive stuff! Other enjoyble moves include jumpping from wall to wall, swinging from bar to bar, swinging from a bar onto a wall and then jumping from the wall onto a higher bar in one sudden movement. When you battle against the demons you have to get them down and pick up there sand using your dagger, they will disappear. If ho
                  wever if take too long they will respawn. The object is to make all the monsters disappear onscreen to progress. This can on occasions be pretty difficult and I would saw gameplay wise I prefer the puzzle element of the game far more than the enemy battles. --------Critical comments of this game-------- The length of the game is not the best being about 10 - 15 hours to complete first time through. Having completed the game there is no other difficulties of play or alternative endings/paths to take in the game. The only extras in the game are a poor conversion of the original PoP as well as a 3D version of the first level of PoP. To be honest neither are anything special. There are a few annoying glitches within the game. This sometimes means you cannot progress in the game. For example I was playing once and Farah died for absolutely no reason whatsoever. Saying this you should still be able to progress in the game and complete it. The only real boss fight is at the end of the game who is easy to beat (Vizier). --------Overall I would rate this game-------- Gameplay: 9/10 - thought provoking puzzles, a good storyline and some cool moves at your disposal. Graphics: 10/10 - very impressive environments and a joy to experience. Longevity: 8/10 - once complete, that's it. There really is no replay value here. Sound: 9/10 - the voice overs are well done and there are some good sound effects. The Prince even talks to himself when playing. Ovreall: 8.9/10 This game is definately worth thinking of purchasing. Yes, undoubtedly there are some obvious complaints but on the whole the design is top notch and it is a fun and rewarding experience.

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                • Product Details

                  Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time takes place in a mystical Middle Eastern setting, all bathed in soft, warm light and looking like something straight out of a storybook. You play as a young prince who possesses exceptional athletic and acrobatic skill. Early on in the game, the prince steals the dagger of time, a treasure from a rival nation, as a token for his father the king. When his nation's traitorous vizier compels the prince to use the dagger to unlock another treasure, a huge hourglass, everything goes wrong. The sands from the hourglass blow forth, enveloping the kingdom and turning its guardsmen and citizens into, for lack of a better way to describe it, sand zombies.