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Pro Evolution Soccer 4 (PS2)

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Manufacturer: Konami / Genre: Sports.

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    7 Reviews
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    • More +
      20.05.2009 20:00

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      Good footie

      This is not a great game nor a terrible game. It had worse graphics than the Fifa 05 game but more action. The commentary was really bad but the gameplay was eay to understand. The game isn't what you call accurate because it doesn't always do whatever you tell it to do and the saving and loading from a normal 8mb PS2 memory card takes ages! The display is clear and the game can work on a NTSC TV so I can hook it up to my USA TV although this may not be that useful for others. The game itself isn't licensed for the teams therefore Arsenal is called North London red which may not be that obvious at the start although the names are the same. If Konami had licensed this game then they wudv'e been onto a winner of 2005 here shame they didn't. Even though this is an old game it is still a must have for any PS2 owners.

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      19.05.2009 14:04
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      Great game, but the new ones have come on leaps and bounds.

      This was the first game in the Pro Evolution Soccer series that i bought following on from being a Fifa Football player. The game is much like the other games in the series, with cup, league and Master League modes all available.

      The game graphics and gameplay are a lot better for this game than they are for the Fifa games as there is a lot more fluidity to the game. However, the ball tends to stick to players boots more whilst dribbling, which makes your players dribble easy but tackling can be quite difficult.

      What i like about this version is the old, retired players that you can bring back to life in the Master League mode. Playing with Gianfranco Zola and Brian Laudrup up front is unstoppable.

      Overall, this is a great game and good to start off your pro evo collection with. The graphics have come on a long way since this game, so if you don't like the more moderb version, then check this one out.

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      31.07.2007 20:27
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      Pro Evo 4 is the best football/soccer game in my opinion. 6 is good but not as good

      Pro Evolution Soccer 4 is absolutely fantastic. I was not very much into football at the time of this game's release but all my friends were eager beavers to get this game and i got this game by chance as one of my friends had two copies (the other was an unwanted present from other friends).
      This game is simply fantastic, it is the most realistic football game ever, much better than fifa;
      (i have previous fifa games like fifa 2003 and previous pro evo games like pro evo 2)
      1) Fifa have different controls, O is shoot etc
      However Fifa games give the players more skill and if you want an easy game fifa is good as its really easy to score - automatic shooting (though newer games can be more advanced)
      2) Fifa is very easy, shoot and ball will automatically go towards the goal
      However Fifa have a larger franchise and provide games on platforms that pro evo does not like the mobile phone for example.
      Fifa also had the rights to the players names (at the time of pro evo 4) and pro evo 4 did not, so the players names are jumbled up versions of the players real names.

      Graphics are fantastic, the controls are superb, (eg. R1 sprint, triangle through ball) and I recently figured out (after so many years) more controls, like the right analogue stick not only does skills but also allows you to curl the ball when you shoot.
      With Pro Evo 4 there are many trick shots you can do like a good simple shot (if the keeper dives down will go over him/in the goal) is press shoot but before you release press R1 then release and the shot will be perfect (not too much power though) (best from very close)
      or you can press L1 when shooting and this will 'lob' the keeper, (go high over his head)this is especially useful if your opponant (like my friends do) like to make their keeper charge out (by holding triangle)

      Pro Evo has many modes, they have a standard season mode which is great and easy to complete, you unlock classic/legend teams like legend argentina etc. (with all famous players)
      you can also have world's best team and europe's best team which comprises of the best players from each relevent continent.

      Best teams to play with on pro evo 4 are: Brazil (as in those days Brazil were the best), Real Madrid (they have fab players) and most other teams too.
      You can also edit teams and create players, so I've made rubbish teams like Iran unbeatable etc.
      Its great fun creating your own team as you can customise the players looks (eg height) etc.

      Training Mode is also great, you can have situation training like shooting, free kicks etc, or free training where you would train with your team against a goal keeper. This is great to practise and build up your skills.

      After having played this game for so long I can say that dificulty wise the game is easy. Before the match you can select the difficulty star rating. Basically the higher the rating the more natural the game - i.e. shoot slightly off target and the ball will go off targer.

      The latest Pro evo is number 6, most famously on the Xbox 360, I have played this game alot on the xbox and can tell you its much more difficult, and very different. I much prefer pro evo 4! The controls and gameplay are much better!! I stunningly found the graphics more likable on pro evo 4, (it could be the tv i played pro evo 6 on) (also charecters faces were better on 4)
      However what pro evo 6 has over 4 is that teams are updated, all transfers occuring in real life are present and teams are changed in terms of ranking and skill.
      However you can overcome this as you can download updates for pro evo 4 from the internet and save them to special ps2 USB's that can be inserted into the playstation 2 (I have a slimline and it has usb ports)(they only work with special USB's)

      Best MomentS!
      I have scored from the halfway line with Zidane, I managed to do the same penalty kick he did in the world cup with Zidane (and the game was made much before the world cup). Zidane is annoying to play with, he's good at shooting but sucks at running, Henry, Rhonaldinho (as he's called in this game), Ronaldo and the likes are great players.
      Christiano Ronaldo is nothing special in the game (as he is special in real life), Michael Owen is one of the fastest runners in the game if not the fastest so is great for penetrating defences. (plays for Real Madrid in game) (so is fairly up to date)

      Pro evo 7 is out - from the Japanese copy of pro evo called winning eleven. The latest winning eleven game is rated the best football game ever, havent played it yet, dont know how ill get a copy but hell im going to try!
      (i think its called winning eleven 2008)

      26th october 2007 is the official release date of the real pro evolution soccer 2007. Whether it will be as good as 4....we'll have to wait and see!

      I want them to make available and indoor stadium, that would be so much fun!

      p.s. I played pro evo 6 on the pc i thought it was better than the xbox 360 version...hmmm

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    • More +
      19.07.2007 10:35
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      This is the best of the Pro Evo series in terms of enjoyment.

      Since this game was released there have been 2 more Pro Evo's come out however although each one has been more complicated and in depth than it's predecessor each one has got gradually less fun. Pro Evo 4 (PE4) I believe is still used in competitions to this day as it is very easy to pick up and very hard to put down.

      I had previously owned PE2, and having previously been a FIFA man for about 10 years I was slightly sceptical about the game. However I really enjoyed that one and when I started playing PE5 with my friends I realised I still enjoyed it so went out and got PE4 (pre-owned) for £3.99. Shortly after we had devolved to PE4 as it was so much easier to play and just a lot more fun, more open play, tackles were easier and the game was allowed to flow a lot more.

      There is still the problem from the earlier games that the names for many players aren't correct, due to legal matters i'm sure. However the names aren't that far out and you can change the names. If you change one or 2 squads each time you play then you'll soon have all the names correct.

      The Edit mode allows you to Edit all aspects of any player in the game (or you can create your own), you can amend things as varied as their name, appearance, club registration, abilities among other things. You can also amend teams in a similar way such as their flag, emblem, strip, name and formation.

      However none of the above needs to be done in order to enjoy the game. If you've not played before then the training mode is very helpful. I used it myself and it taught me a number of things that have come in very handy. Mainly the ability to side step around the opposition and also the ability to adjust the style of how you control the ball in dead ball situations. There is a challenge mode also that allows you to prove your learning.

      The Master League mode allows you to take a minor team and make them stars. You need to be good before you start this as all your results count. I've not used this option much but it is quite in-depth and involves things like training your players, wheeling and dealing in the transfer market and obviously playing games.

      If this all sounds a bit to in depth for you then the plain and simple league mode (or cup mode) is probably for you. Basically you just pick a league (Italy, Germany, Holland, France, Spain or England) and just play games in order to try and be the league champion. You will pick up experience points for doing this that allow you to buy extras in the shop that add to the overall enjoyment of the game. The league is very easy to get into but you need to get the skill level right. If it's set too easy you will destroy the opposition. However, set it too hard and it can be quite demoralising (now I know how Saints feel every season).

      Then you come to the most enjoyable mode, especially when with friends, the friendly (exhibition mode). Basically pick any 2 teams and just get down to playing. My work mates and I play this most lunchtimes and normally do three 10 minute games, depending on time. We constantly change team but it's interesting seeing the different styles come out. I'm much more attacking and have the attitude of Brazil - you score 1 we score 2, if you get one more then we'll just do the same. Another one plays like England do, pass the ball around a lot to try and get an opening and then fluff it. The last main one is very good with the bad international teams as he often plays as Saints and so is used to playing as a team with good team work but less individual skill.

      There are many controls to master in this game however all you need to know to get started is how to pass, tackle and shoot.

      In conclusion this is a very fun game that i don't think will be bettered for a long time in terms of playabilitiy and addictiveness.

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      • More +
        24.06.2007 01:36
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        Pro Evolution Soccer 4 for PlayStation 2

        Please note that my review and rating does not take into account the multiplayer aspect of this game.

        My first thoughts of Pro Evolution Soccer 4 were that it was perhaps too similar to the previous effort to have warranted me buying it in new condition. However with time the game came good, establishing itself as a first choice at the expense of PES 3. The balance and willingness to play attacking football meant that this was one lineup I'll remember.

        Yet it didn't have all the familiar names (FIFA did!), there is the Edit Mode to make amends. The Master League is revamped, so that the players develop over time which is neat. I do miss the negotiation options in PES 3 since the management aspect is still lightweight, so pulling off a player transfer is trickier than it need be.

        The game features a referee on pitch which can be a distraction but it's certainly not as bad as the hand-ball in PES 3. In the previous game the referees were not hesitant to show the card, but here they are not strict enough so dirty play does not get punished – something which the computer controlled opponents get away with. There was an attempt to implement the Advantage rule, but I found it to be hit and miss.

        PES 4 makes the smart move of extending the short pass (read: pass along ground) and its working is as it should be as you really do get a feel for making these passes. The interpretation isn't always correct though (blame the slow response of the analogue stick?) and the passing angles can be unnatural, likewise the animation as the shooting doesn't look convincing. The goalkeepers are also suspect but PES 4 has well enough nice touches to play out a highly convincing game of football time and time again.

        I say PES 4 is attack-oriented - if the presence of Thierry Henry and Francesco Totti on the front cover were possible indication of anything - because the game plays at quite a fast (if unrealistic) pace. Perhaps as a result, the defence suffers as the marking doesn't stay tight. As for the computer opposition, I find they are too predictable and it can get to a point where they would rarely dominate proceedings over me. Of course you'll want to play against a friend if it's the competition you're after, oh how I wish my brother was into football!

        The graphics in this game are good without it being immense, and the player likenesses vary. The commentary is useless as ever, it's so poor that I sometimes substitute it for that another language so that I do not make out what is being said. PES 4 easily qualifies as a successful football game, and like the sport itself there is such an emotional detachment. I would definitely recommend this over the third and fifth Pro Evolution Soccer games as it passes PES 3 off the park and unlike PES 5, stays on its feet to play a game of football - and a good one at that.

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        • More +
          04.02.2007 16:35
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          A review of the game of pro evolution soccer 4

          Some would say the best football game out, others argue that fifa still had the edge, one things for sure that if Pro evo 4 had better graphics and more licensing it would beet fifa 10-0, pro evolution soccer is miles above fifa and as it continues to evolve it moves higher and higher above fifa each time.

          The problem this time around after 3 is that it has not been updated enough, Pro evolution soccer’s problem is licensing everyone that plays this game will know how annoying it is to get the game and have to update it or, sit there and play with teams where players names are so daft that they make no sense what so ever, however some people use this as a plus point to the game, I know people that can sit there hours on end and edit the game fully until it’s maxed out.

          In my answer to the licensing problem I would say create your own team, this way you get the excitement of playing in the master league with players that you know personally or ones you have just made up!

          I think the master league is a great feature because you get to train players to make them better, you can also make it in to your own team by editing features, that means you can have yourself scoring the goal that wins the league, it brings a management side to the game, I love management games as well so combining the two was a great idea however pro evolution soccer management was a poor game and a waste of time, so don’t bother!

          In a master league you start off in division 2, and have to work your way up which is hard because you have a bad team but you do pick up some points then you can negotiate with other teams for their players, and improve your own, if you are new to the game then it will take you a while to progress up the leagues unless your playing one star!

          Before starting a master league I recommend that you play some exabition matches, just to get into the swing of things, even if you have already played the pro evo series because it does have a different game play to Pro Evolution Soccer 3.

          Here’s one problem with the whole pro evolution series, if you play a match against the computer 1 star or 2 stars is very basic however when you move on to 3 4 5 and now 6 stars the game gets a lot harder so if you are trying to pick up the game I recommend you play with a friend so they can tell you the basics and maybe even let you win a few times!!

          New skills can be mastered in this game, and also one thing I love about this game is the training mode, you can do challenges to get up to 5 stars which is fun in itself but this also improves your skill on the pitch as well.

          This game is a big party game, I would not recommend playing alone for a long time as it sometimes gets boring and repeative and can put you off a great game.

          A game that is relatively simple has a long lasting effect, and it's value for money as you always come back to play it and as you can not complete the game there is no end.

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          • More +
            06.12.2005 14:57
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            Who ate all the pies? Who cares!

            Once upon a time in the lands of gaming (or to be more precise, the early nineties), there was a wonderful football game called Sensible Soccer, which occupied many a console and many a gamers heart. But time waits for no game, and when FIFA first appeared in 1994 with such incredible concepts as ‘real team names’ and something called ‘the offside rule’, Sensi Soccer began to look a little… well, simple.

            Fast-forward a decade to 2004. FIFA has been occupying gamers consoles (if not their hearts) for ten years, always coming out as the top-seller each Christmas (except for 2000 and the unfeasible popularity of the Who Wants To Be A Millionaire? cash-cow). But time waits for no game as they say, and in its complacency, FIFA didn’t notice the new kid on the block, Pro Evolution Soccer, with such amazing concepts as ‘hyper intelligent A.I.’ and ‘more real than real-life gameplay’ and FIFA began to look a little… well, dated.

            Of course, Pro Evolution Soccer was by no means an overnight success – the series did in fact begin as I.S.S. back on the Super Nintendo. Indeed, if you take into account that the series has adopted more names than Prince down the years (I.S.S. Pro, I.S.S. Pro Evolution, Pro Evolution Soccer to name but a few), there have actually been more than 10 editions in the last 10 years. But it was Pro Evolution Soccer 4 (PES4), the subject of this review, that was the first version of Konami’s acclaimed football dynasty to actually outsell EA’s normally-untouchable FIFA franchise when they went head-to-head; it proved a real victory for word-of-mouth – gradually, magazines and hardcore gamers alike were able to give the series the advertisement that Konami seemed unwilling to produce for their own masterpiece, and with a fifth instalment doing better than ever, all seems rosy.

            On paper at least, PES4 is your average footie simulation – 80 club-sides and 57 national teams make for better reading than PES3, though its certainly nothing FIFA hasn’t offered for the last five or six years, and many of the national teams (Germany, Czech Republic) are not licensed and therefore don’t carry real player names. There’s an exhibition mode, a training setup and various league and cup options; but again, these are standard fare these days. There are 3 elements that make PES4 (and its more recent predecessors) stand out from the crowd – its gameplay, its multiplayer and the Master League mode.

            I’ll make no bones about it – PES4 is not an easy game to pick up and play, and that’s perhaps why the more accessible FIFA games were always more popular amongst the casual gamer. PES4 isn’t about 10-0 wins – it’s a football game that really makes you think about your actions and graft out your victories. Scoring a goal through one method of attack doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll be able to score again using the same tactic; defenders are quick to learn your attack patterns, and so don’t expect to charge through on pace alone. Speed may have worked in other football games down the years, but here you are encouraged to craft your goals; passing the ball around trying to expose gaps in the oppositions defence; drawing a foul in the penalty area after a trip from a careless defender; or sneaking a through-ball between the opponents last line of defence, seeing your striker dummy the keeper win a feint and tap it coolly into the net. It manages to create an astounding feeling of satisfaction in the player as you score each and every goal. There are times when you realise there are hundreds of different ways to score, and yet all are so difficult to fulfil in their own manner.

            PES4 is a beloved of the fans as it recreates the tension and atmosphere of real football matches to near-perfection. I don’t consider myself the biggest fan of the sport, but within a matter of minutes of beginning a match I find myself swearing myself blue at the referees for an unjust booking or ridiculously-unfair offside decision. As each and every player in the game has a remarkable wealth of individual statistics that cover ‘attack’ and ‘defend’, ‘stamina’ and ‘speed’, and ‘teamwork’ and ‘mentality’, they are all individual in the true sense of the word. What makes PES4 such a wonderful (but consequently often maddening) imitation of the sport is its mixture of the unpredictable (players blasting shots into the stands when you simply wished them to tap it in the bottom-corner, passes going astray, deflected goals, goalkeepers fumbling under-pressure) and the moments of magic such as the occasions that see you dribbling past a number of defenders and chipping the keeper to score in the cheekiest, most glorious manner imaginable mean its more often than not a superlative, gripping experience.

            What marks it out from its predecessor(s)? Well, the pace of the action is slightly faster than previously, and whilst PES4 has been criticised for this, I found it took little time to adjust and ultimately one-touch passing became more fluid and less difficult to execute. Graphics and sound are slight improvements from before, as are the overall player movements and control, which is good news for fans. On a more negative note, the shot power-bar is still notoriously sensitive – even a slight nudge can sometimes send the ball into the crowd, and my opinion Konami should revert to the system used in the later PSOne games, whereby skill is still paramount but shots a little easier to judge. Free-kicks meanwhile are still ludicrously difficult to master (I’ve only ever scored 2 or 3 in what must have been several hundred attempts!) and penalties still have no power or direction bars, meaning a shot may be missed through no fault of the gamer. The A.I. still (at times) employ the annoying tactic of running vertically towards the touchline, so as to ensure they cannot be tackled, and even in 5 minute matches, they often seem intent on passing it around their midfield playing keep-ball rather than trying to attack. Fortunately, the Edit mode has been improved; making the changing of players and team placements is far less difficult than in Pro Evo 3, and therefore meaning for a lot less needless fiddling about on menu screens. Though PES4 can’t match certain games for licences, it at least out-strides its predecessors for proper teams, though many club-names have to be altered to fit the bill in terms of true authenticity.

            The multiplayer mode is bliss, as it retains all the drama and depth of the one-player experience, without any of the questionable A.I. tactics. Should you and your friend prove quite attack-minded, it can make for some breathless end-to-end action – my most memorable time included a 3-3 draw in a Milan derby, whereby I eventually lost a hilarious penalty shoot-out 10-9, after even the keepers had taken their shots. Whether winning or losing, PES4 has a magical ‘one-more-go’ factor to it that grips like a vice – it’s amazingly addictive.

            Not only do the players behave in a realistic way, they also look eerily like their real-life counterparts too – the Italian’s with their greasy hair-do’s and Del Piero with his silver boots, Edgar Davids’ with his glasses, Rio Ferdinand with his dreadlocks – even the faces look remarkably accurate for the most part. The level of animations is also hugely impressive, as players show disgust at being booked, stumble or writhe around after a tackle, hang their heads at missed opportunities and sulk off when defeated – it’s these little things that make the game so realistic as a whole.

            Not so convincing however is the commentary, which still lacks variety comes out sounding more like some bawdy innuendo at times (“He’s looking for a free man!” and “I felt that tackle up here!” spring to mind), and whilst Peter Brackley at least sounds like he belongs chiefly, Trevor Brooking is over the top, unproductive and quite useless really. Oh well, not even PES is entirely perfect…

            So it looks and plays like a dream – how does its lifespan hold up? Fortunately, that too is assured, and though it seems more of an ‘update’ than an ‘evolution’ of PES3 in truth, the revamped Master League alone warrants the games purchase. Taking a club team of your choice, you must work your way up through the lower league, with the ultimate aim of winning the ‘WEFA’ (or European) Cup and taking your team to the top of the rankings. In this mode, players age over time and therefore improve/depreciate depending on their age. Therefore, you must discover the right balance of experience and youth to best suit your team; whilst contracts must be debated; players bought and sold and money monitored. The better your results, the greater your earnings, though its game over if you can’t pay the wages come the end of a season.

            More good news – PES4 is only £9.99 on play.com now, and though I don’t normally recommend very tough games to the youngsters, Pro Evolution Soccer 4 may well be just the ticket for those looking for a high-class, progressive challenge, and with six difficulty settings, its guaranteed to keep ‘em off the streets for a good while too. Needless to say, its every bit as good a game for the ‘grown-ups’ too, though given the hysteria that surrounds each new instalment, I probably didn’t need to tell you that.

            Pro Evolution Soccer 4 is ultimately another successful continuation of by the far the best football-game series around. It captures with it all the excitement of a crushing victory, the pain of defeat to a last-minute goal and all that’s in-between, and what’s more it does it with finesse and buckets of style – it looks a peach, has gameplay that’s been honed to perfection, a Master League for long-term fun and a multiplayer mode that will last more or less forever. Or at least until you buy PES5. Absolutely essential.

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          • Product Details

            The finest football simulation series receives further refinements in Pro Evolution Soccer 4. The presence of an on-screen referee is perhaps the game's most obvious new feature. What's more, this twenty-third being on the pitch is more intelligent than his invisible predecessors: advantages are played more frequently and the fairness of decisions is improved. Another welcome new feature is that of player-specific special moves, whereby only certain gifted footballers will have outlandish tricks in their repertoire--very much in keeping with real life.