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Creative Jukebox 10 GB

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      26.08.2010 00:31

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      too large mp3 player - well past it's sell by date

      have owned one for 6 years and while it was good in its day I would not get it out of the drawer anymore. The capacity is good...and that's ábout it on the positives. The display is basic and very slow to scroll through, it regularly crashes, is far to heavy and bulky (similar size to the old personal cd players) and the battery life is abysmal. You will get 2.5 hours out of it if it is fully charged (and if you are lucky) and because it takes a bespoke battery you won't be able to pick up spares anywhere. After the 1st hour of use it's best to set a playlist and not touch it as most times when you go to change track/look at another menu, the whole thing will just reboot. Sound quality is ok if you use the chunky headphones that come with it...otherwise that is rubbish as well. The best thing you can do with it is take out the internal hard drive and use it as a backup device for your pc

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      14.06.2003 01:07
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      The Creative Jukebox (JB1) has been on the market for some time now, and has been superseded (in Creative's eyes) by the JB2 and JB3 both of which come with a few improvements. However, if you can get hold of one I'd recommend you do so and here's why: - The price has dropped significantly to the point where the original 6Gb version can be bought new for just over £150; a friend just got a 2nd hand one for £110! - All the JB1 driver updates, transfer and CD ripping software are available on line for free. The improved firmware makes the start-up time faster, lengthens the battery life during play, and allows the JB1 to be used as a data storage unit as well as a music play-back device. - Upgrading the Hard disk storage is easy! My original 10Gb unit now has a 30Gb HDD, and is capable of holding about 600 CDs on it. The new disk drive cost me £80 (a Fujitsu MHS2030AT laptop 9.5mm HDD), and took me just under an hour to do the whole upgrade. - The JB1, whichever way you look at it, is a highly portable, user friendly, well built MP3 and WMA player that will is capable of storing (with an upgrade) most people?s entire CD collection. I've had my JB1 for a year now, and am still really pleased with it. What's more, I'm not bored with it yet. That, for people who know me, is a recommendation in itself!

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        08.01.2003 18:27
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        I have been the proud owner of a trusty Diamond Rio MP3 player for a couple of years now. It was an emerging technology when I originally bought it and since that time new products have come and gone and we where told that with the ‘demise’ of Napster that the digital music scene was dead. In this time though I have come to swear by my Rio and everyone should realise digital players are not just for ‘pirates’. The only problem was that despite having a reasonable amount of memory in it I could only get around 25 tracks on it. This wasn’t the end of the world as I did rotate the songs but I was on the lookout for something that could hold a bit more. There are basically two types of MP3 players on the market – those that require memory to operate (like my old Diamond Rio), e.g. 32, 64 or 128MB of RAM and those, like the Jukebox, that rely on some sort of internal hard disk. Needless to say the difference between the two is size on a couple of counts. A 10GB internal hard disk can hold a hell of a lot more files than 128MB of RAM but anything holding a ‘hard disk’ has to be bigger. While memory based MP3 players can be found as small as a pendant the average disk based player is around the size of a CD – but this is also changing. The final difference at the moment is price. Memory based players are generally a lot cheaper than the disk based systems. Forgetting the memory-based players for now (they have plenty of reviews in there own right) I shall give a brief overview of the current market for disk based players. It would be fair to say that there are fewer companies vying for this market and the major players are Creative, SONICblue (of Diamond Rio fame) Archos and Apple. These devices tend to hover anywhere between £250 and £300 and vary in size with all the company’s now managing players the size of some memory based MP3 players. Generally though the smaller the more expensive. Of al
        l the companies Creative seem to offer the largest range of products and price including the small Zen, a more powerful NOMAD Jukebox 3 and the object of this review the CD sized NOMAD JukeBox 2. Coming in at around £170 (from Amazon) this is, as far as I can tell, the cheapest such a player has arrived on the market so far and brought it into a range for me to make a purchase. In truth anything over £200 was still making me wince as a bit of a luxury. Having received my purchase promptly from Amazon (as usual) after an aborted attempt to visit a Comet superstore to save a pound and a day (“sorry Sir digital audio is so yesterday. Fancy a mini-disk player?”) I prepared to unbox, install and be frustrated as per normal with electronic items. The following is based on my ownership so far (albeit a week) and will be updated if any shocking discoveries come to light. First off installation was a breeze. Basically your first task is to install the rechargeable battery which needs a charging of 4 hours to give you a supposed 16 hours of playtime. Now this is my first little challenge of the packaging. So far I have not got anywhere near 16 hours without running out of battery. I will stand corrected on this when I have done some exact science but a full charge will definitely give you a ‘number of hours’. As my player charged I proceeded with the software installation which again was uneventful. The software installation comprises of drivers as well as the Creative PlayCenter which makes up the bulk of the software and is the main front end for ‘ripping’ and transferring files to your Jukebox. Perhaps the only thing I would make a note of was the option of making PlayCenter your default MP3 player on your PC. You don’t need to select this option if you prefer, for instance, Microsoft Media Player. Having recharged my player it was time to plug it into my PC (the Jukebox does not support Mac̵
        7;s) via USB. The player supports both USB 1.1 and 2 according to the packaging. One point to be aware of is that from research I have made since the player does not work well connected to a USB hub. Direct is best. For me though no trouble and Windows 2000 found my player and launched Creative PlayCenter as expected. I was now ready to transfer music to my player. Like I said at the beginning I have a number of downloaded MP3 files but the vast majority of my music is still on piles of CD’s. To get this music off a CD you must ‘rip it’. Fortunately there is a good multi-media presentation that talks you through the major features installed with the software. For this procedure you use the Creative PlayCenter. The basic process of this is as follows – Insert audio CD PlayCenter optionally (but advisedly) connects to the CDDB Database on the Internet to download artist and song information. Without this you would have to manually key in information on each song. PlayCenter ‘rips’ the CD and stores the songs on your hard disk in either MP3 or WMA format. A typical MP3 file comes in at 3 to 4MB in size, WMA generally smaller. When this process is complete (and on my not so quick PC this takes around 15 minutes or so an album) you are ready to transfer your songs to the Jukebox. The sync process is again pretty straightforward. Select the album or songs and just press a button. A whole album will be transferred to your player in less than a minute. I guess one of the differences to the more expensive players is the size of the internal disk. The disk on the NOMAD JukeBox 2 is claimed to be 10GB (the system tells me closer to 9 ½) whereas you can get bigger disks on the other models. To give you a very rough idea on this I have used about 1GB so far but have transferred over 30 albums. It will be a couple more weeks before I get my whole collection across! So you have your album
        s across and now it’s down to the player. The system comes with a pair of decent headphones first of all. Not world beating but do the job. If you are big into music you might just want to splash out for something better. Also supplied is a reasonable carry case with belt clip. Controls are on the side and top of the device. On the side is the power on/off, headphone socket and the perhaps a little fiddley main control used for moving up and down and selecting. On the front are the menu, volume up, down, play, stop and pause keys etc. Navigating to a song is pretty simple. You can select by artist, album or genre etc. Another nice feature is custom playlists. You can create multiple playlists (such as ‘Summer Driving’) and put various songs in it. Once playing the sound is very good, perhaps my only slight complaint that I would like the volume up one more notch sometimes. OK so far very positive, almost 5 stars, but here is my attempt to knock us down to 4 out of 5. No doubt all machines have quirks and this is no exception. On a couple of occasions the device has switched itself off almost as though it is running out of power. Switching it back on it is fine. I have had a couple of refusals transferring files across. Trying again seems to solve the problem. If not deleting the songs from the album transferred so far and trying again seems to do it. Like I say happened a couple of times. I have also heard some people complain about the PlayCenter generally but I think it does an adequate job. For those who really dislike it a new 3rd party utility called ‘Notmad’ can be bought instead for around $25. I guess I should also point out again these systems are generally bigger than standard MP3 players. I have little doubt they are also more prone to failure because of more moving parts. Whereas I could throw my Diamond Rio across a room and get away with it I doubt I could do the same with m
        y JukeBox. I wish I could mention all the other features of the JukeBox (for instance its ability to be used for standard file transfer between machines) but alas I don’t want to boar you to death. Bottom line is if you are looking for a good functional disk based MP3 player at a knock down price the JukeBox 2 could be just for you.

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          16.03.2002 20:33
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          The Creative Jukebox - the new way of listening to music? The rise in status, recognition and availability of MP3s has been startling. Many however say that MP3s are ruining music, making it so easy to download an album that people no longer go out and buy CDs. True that might be, but still I think that must people would like to own CDs, just to actually have something to look at, to hold and to show off. Can you do that with MP3s? I don't think so. I decided therefore to embrace this new way of listening to music. I bought the Creative D.A.P. Jukebox, the first one out on the market. It allows you to store some 1000 tracks, about 100 albums, or 100 hours worth of music, however you want to look at it. As well as this, the website allows monthly downloads of new software and hardware direct to the 'box in order to maximise its functioning as it is developed by those in charge. So what is so good about the 'box? Firstly it allows you to donwload music stright form the computer and store it away on the system. This allows a means of listening to the new songs you have downloaded where-ever you go. The storage of tracks is very easy to utilise, with the tracks stored under artsit name, album name, and genre, so that you can easily access the song that you wish to listen to. There are options to allow faster playback, although I still have never worked out why this is required, obviously for DJs or for those people that wish to listen to an entire album but don't have the time to do so. Likewise, there is a slow playback option, which seems even stranger to me, but hey, we can boast about having them can't we? There is the option of creating a playlist, something very easy to do - just by selecting the tracks that you won't to play and then adding them to the list. There is an EQ control, to control sound levels, surround sound options, bass, treble and mid frequencies and environmental settin
          gs, such as arena or concert hall. However to me these latter environmental settings again don't seem to be there for anything but for show as I usually keep it on normal. However, the option of allowing anything from 0-100% use of these environments, make it easy to allocate as little or as much of these selected ways of listening to your tracks as you desire. The battery life is very good, taking about 5 hours to fully charge and then allowing about 10hours of playback. There is an available option to allow you to check the percentage of battery life remaining. THi sis useful as if you're like me you take it out alot and then find that you have no battery left about 2 minutes form your home, meaning that you must carry around something that can't do anything.+ So what are the negatives? The actual start-up of the 'box is still painfully slow. Despite many updates that have made it slightly faster to download, it still takes about 20 seconds to fully load up. When it has loaded, the tracks that you created in your last list are often no longer there, meaning that the whole track selection process must be gone through again if the tracks weren't stored as a play list. It takes too long to change a playlist name also, so mine usually all have the exact same name as it is easier, although this is very confusing whern you try to find the list you were last listening to. It also takes a long time to scan through the artists. If you want Weezer for example, for must go through every letter until you come to W, which takes a long time and is very frustrating. When out walking, it sometimes turns itself off for no reason at all. This is confusing and frustrating as it then takes ages to load back up again. Although not heavy, the actual size of the 'box may prove negative to some people as it is too large to walk with it in your pocket. The supplied carry case does not h
          ave a hole to attach your head phones either, meaning the this case can not be used while you walk. Conclusion The Jukebox is a very worthy acquisition. Although costly and chunky, it allows a huge number of tracks to be stored and the quality of the stored music is superb! I would highly recommend getting one, but I would buy the latter model now as that can store 2000 hours of music or something silly like that. I also recommend checking the website every few weeks in order to upgrade your machine. It really does imprve its performance. I only hope that soon the start-up time will be even faster but I suppose with such a large library this is hard.

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          24.02.2002 19:15
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          I know it?s been advertised to death but this product really lives up to the hype. I bought mine direct from the US and so have had it for some time now. The player itself attracts interest just on its looks but it wins people over when they hear the quality and actually realise the potential that the 6Gb capacity gives. Technically (without jargon hopefully) it stores the music files on a small robust hard disk along with its Operating System and also allows for voice annotation recording storage. It connects to a PC/MAC via the supplied USB cable and this is where you source your music files for the device. I say music files as it now supports WMA files as well as MP3 files ? this highlights one of the benefits of this player over most solid state MP3 players, the ability to upgrade its capabilities. The player?s own home page www.nomadworld.com, provides drivers updates for the PC/MAC software AND the firmware (tech term meaning hardware dependant software) on the player. How does it perform? Well let?s firstly list the sticking points for most people: Low battery life ? due to the power required to run a hard disk the rechargeable batteries only last for a couple of hours (however, the device comes with two complete sets of batteries) It?s heavy ? in comparison to most MP3 and some Minidisk players, again due to the hard disk and 4 batteries, so not suitable for jogging with. Having said this I travel to work by train, each day, with it in my coat pocket and it?s fine. It?s expensive ? any purchase over £300 is likely to be seen as over the top (especially explaining to partner!) but compare to a Sony Memorystick with 64Mb memory for £30 difference? Good/Great/Selling points: Music quality ? what it?s used for and therefore paramount, the software supplied for the PC (sorry MAC users) is superb (and has just been updated) and allows you to manage all your music files on the devi
          ce and your PC effortlessly. I record from my CD?s using 75% variable bit rate and the quality is excellent ? it takes roughly 25-30 mins to rip an average CD ? the files created are probably slightly larger than most fixed bit rate recordings (which you can use if you prefer) but they sound perfect. Plus it downloads Album/Artist/Genre info from CDDB2. Looks ? it?s in the London Design Museum! Seriously cool. Capacity ? I have with me, as I write, all my favourite music plus some of the preloaded music that they supply (20 hours, mainly showcasing it?s abilities but I have left most of the ?Classical Best Of?s? on, also comes with two audio books!). Playlists allows me to listen to any selection of my music, created on the fly or via the PC/MAC software. Features a plenty ? EAX effects (as in their SoundBlaster Live products), surprisingly effective if limited in use, ability to speed up/slow down playback (mainly used for audio book) works well, standard EQ settings, Headphone/Surround speaker spatialization (very smart ? but uses extra battery life), Library with playlists, albums, artists and genres alphabetically sorted with search facility, and more! Wishlist ? www.nomadworld.com provides excellent support and a good forum where wishlists and problems can be raised, the Creative team does take these things on board and the player and software are being improved all the time. It?s just excellent and keeps getting better.

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            14.02.2002 20:46
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            I started out in portable/car audio a few years ago when i fitted a 6 disc changer to my car. The downside to this was i got bored of the six cds quite rapidly and eventually even got bored changing the cds around. So when i sold my car, i sold the CD player. For the next year i was stuck with a protable CD player, in the gloove box and CDs flying everywhere....not a good idea! Then One Birthday the Jukebox arrived from my darling girlfriend... was this to be the answer to my CD nightmare...... YES! it was it fitted nicely to the cradle from my goodmans with the help of a bit of velco, I picked up a nice 12V adaptor from Maplins and i used the tape adaptor from the goodmans cd player.. It worked like a dream over 150 hours of CD quality music at the touch of a button. Downloading the DATA...# How easy can it be converted all my cds, stored them as mp3s on a couple of DVD Rs and Created a vast range of playlists. Now i just load up the mp3s and playlists and away i go. Its also useful for transfering some powerpoint and other large document files between my home and work. Creative have always been an excellent choice for PC audio but i think that this product is so good for the money and does so much more than just playing MP3 files. great product i must say!

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              25.09.2001 17:54
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              I’ll admit it – I’m an MP3 aficionado. I’ve converted hundreds of albums so I can play them on my empeg player, and I’ve owned a variety of MP3 players, from the Diamond Rio to the MpTrip. However, when I got my Nomad Jukebox, I wondered if I really needed this gadget, or whether it was simply an extravagance that I could afford to do without. The thing is, three months later, I’m still wondering. The MP3 Format…The World’s A Stage ======================== Mention the MP3 format to anyone these days; your grandmother, people on the street, politicians, musicians, and you’ll get an array of opinions, and a few scathing looks as well. MP3 used to be the compression of young males with pale skin and pocket protectors, but now everyone including your kid sister has heard of it and used it. Napster made it famous. Metallica made it prohibited. And now, with the invention of such players as the Nomad Jukebox, it is part of our lives and here to stay. That is, until something better comes out. MP3 is almost the perfect tool for the people that love music as much as I do. When Napster was first released by a green entrepreneur by the name of Shawn Fanning, you were hard pressed to find anything but Britney Spears and the latest shattering harmonies from the Backstreet Boys. Now, however, there is almost more unreleased and remixed material out there – and we’re hoarding it as quickly as we can for fear of another Metallica situation. …And These Are Merely Players ======================== It would make sense then that MP3 players were developed to handle this media. They began small, with only 32mb capacity, and the extravagant of us bought the 64mb versions. They came with CompactFlash cards, and then gradually they grew in size, although still, 128mb and below are common. When the MamboX, the first MP3 CD-Player mentioned, a floodgate of hardware enthusiasts c
              ome out to proclaim its heavenly values. Unfortunately, it was approximately twelve months late, and by that time other MP3 CD-Players were released. MP3 CD-Players provide a capacity of 650mb, but come with the proviso that you own a CD writer in order to write your media. Finally, the Personal Jukebox (PJB) was released, but it seemed all too expensive, even for those with expansive pockets. And then, out of nowhere, Creative Labs, one of the biggest consumer electronic computer companies (odds are your soundcard on your computer is made by them), released the Nomad Jukebox, with an amazing 6GB capacity at half the price of the PJB. It uses a 9.5mm laptop hard drive instead of the usual CompactFlash, and due to its price, ease of use and portability, has become one of the most popular MP3 players to date. The Nomad ======================== So how does it stack up? First of all, regarding capacity, there is more than one version. The original NJB came with only 6GB, and you could buy “bootleg” hard drives and either get an expert to wire it in for you, or do it yourself. The problem with this was that Creative used their own propriety hard drive format, and so many users spent hours fiddling and voiding their warranties. Eventually Creative realised the error of their ways, and now offers a 6GB cut down version (without headphones or extra set of batteries) and a 20GB version for those with more MP3s than is necessary. If you go to NomadJukebox.net, you’ll be able to pick up a 30GB version for not that much more than the 20GB version – and they’ll even throw in a warranty for free. Just Gimme The Specs! ======================== Size: 5.5” (W) x 5” (H) x 1.5” (D) Weight: 14 oz Capacity: 6GB (20GB and 30GB options are available) (100 hours at 128kbps encoding) Power Source: 1800mAH Ni-MH (Nickel Metal Hydride) AA 1.2V batteries. (4 hours) or AC Adapter Disp
              lay: 132x64 LCD (with backlight) Software Used: Creative PlayCenter Interface: USB Harmonic Distortion Output: < 0.1% Maximum Output: 100 mW Frequency Response: 20 Hz – 20 kHz Signal to Noise Ratio: >90 dB It also has a 8MB DRAM buffer. What does this mean for people not initiated with the inside workings of computers? Well, it means basically that this allows for five minutes of shock protection. If you’re doing an activity that means you’re bouncing up and down for five minutes, perhaps you shouldn’t be looking at the Jukebox. Let’s Begin… ======================== The Jukebox is extremely easy to set up. You put the batteries in first – four Ni-MH batteries, which is rather unfortunate. I don’t know why Creative went the cheap way and didn’t provide a Lithium Ion battery like you find in MiniDiscs these days, but I suppose that was part of the way of keeping the cost down. The NJB comes with approximately 1700mb of preloaded music that runs for about 20 hours, and there’s enough to keep you interested…for a while. Eventually you’ll get bored of this and want to put your own music in – which, of course, you have, or wouldn’t have bought the player in the first place. Right? After loading up the PlayCenter software, which is nicely shaded in blue with big buttons. The software is rather confusing the first time you use it; you can organise by genre or by artist, but you end up having to type in a lot more data than you should. The software also allows you to rip MP3s directly onto the player – which is great, unless you know ANYTHING about music and then you won’t let that hideous encoder that Creative have installed near your MP3s. For the best results, use LAME (LAME Ain’t An MP3 Encoder) to encode your MP3s rather than Creative’s, if you’re looking for quality. Oh yeah, and the PlayC
              enter isn't the best for ID3 tags, so you might want to consider doing those manually. Uploading MP3s isn’t as easy as you might like, considering that Creative sure could have made it a whole lot easier by mirroring Windows Explorer or such. Transferring takes a while, especially if you’ve queued a lot of MP3s. I found it was probably about 5 or 6 seconds for each megabyte, give or take a few milliseconds. This can add up to a lot if you want your music on the go, but it’s a sacrifice you have to make. That means an “average” song of about 4mb would take approximately 20 seconds. You can make playlists in both the PlayCenter software and on the NJB, but it’s a lot easier if you make them inside the software, as it can get tedious typing in names of playlists on the tiny display. One feature that is hard to find is the shuffle mode – I decided to put all my MP3s in one list and just shuffle it. Apparently in the next firmware update, they will have a Queue All function. Firmware, you ask? Well, firmware is the software that actually controls your NJB – that is, inside the player. And it can be upgraded. The good news is, Creative and other NJB community members are always trying to improve the system and make it easier to use. Hence, if they do not have a feature that should be there or you would like, chances are that one day you might have it on your player. That’s a good thing. Now We’ve Got Some MP3s… ======================== First things first – if you pack this thing with MP3s, expect a long wait when you boot it up. My first boot took probably fifty seconds or so, at the very least. Once it boots it takes you to the Active Queue list. If there are any files in there, it will play those, otherwise you can select MP3s from the categories in the Library: Albums, Artists and Genres. Unfortunately the screen only displays 26 characters so if
              you’re anally retentive like I am about your MP3 naming scheme (Artist – Album – Year – Number – Song), then you’re not going to see much. There’s also a search function which is useful if the Jukebox is full. So, what does it sound like? The Jukebox has -very- decent sound quality, however I would recommend buying a new pair of headphones, as the ones the NJB comes with are not my style (they are the wrap-around ear ones). Of course, if you’re buying the Jukebox-C, which comes without headphones, then this isn’t a problem. The sound is excellent, perhaps with a little too much emphasis on the treble, but otherwise very listenable. Creative have made much of their “EAX” sound technology that includes all sorts of useless options like “City.” It will make the NJB sound like it’s being played in a city. Pretty useless if you ask me. The Jukebox isn’t that loud, either, which annoyed me (I tried playing it in my car). The Jukebox itself is very sturdy, but I wouldn’t recommend throwing it around. I tried jogging with it and it didn’t skip, although I was attempting to keep it steady. The best thing about the Jukebox is that it truly is a mobile MP3 station. I love the ability to choose what I want to listen to without having to root through my bag and find a CD or MiniDisc, and the sound is brilliant. It’s good for parties too if you hook it up to an external speaker system…but… It’s Not ALL Rosy… ======================== It has its share of problems. The Jukebox is, well, slow. Sometimes you’ll click a button and wait a few seconds for it to register, especially when you’re playing back music. The search and queue functions definitely need work, as does the horrid PlayCenter software. I can understand why Creative made the software the way they did, to cater for entry-level users like
              Grandma and Grandpa, but they could have easily made do with a Windows Explorer interface. Oh, did I mention, the player is also SDMI compliant, so that in the future you might not be able to play your own MP3s without degrees of difficulty. The display, too, on the Jukebox needs a bit of work, but I assume this can be fixed in the firmware updates. Conclusion ======================== The Creative Labs Nomad Jukebox is an excellent MP3 player, but it’s not perfect. Little things irk you when you’re on the road, but there are certainly more positives than negatives. If you’re addicted to MP3s like me, get this right now. One of the best things about this player is the community surrounding it – you can download different software to use instead of the PlayCenter, you can download patches to allow you to move MP3s from the player to your computer (normally blocked), and you can even put extra capacity hard drives in. Creative have shown dedication to this product by improving the system and firmware rather regularly, which is always a good thing to see in a large company. The most important thing that a purchase of a Nomad Jukebox boils down to is: are you going to need 6GB of MP3s? Or 20GB? Or even 30GB? Even if I put every album I own on there I wouldn’t have 30GB, so that’s a little bit of overkill. 6GB seems just about right, so in all honesty I’d stick with that player. The Jukebox is a nifty instrument to show off to your friends and become the envy of your enemies. Sure, it’s got its share of problems, but what new hardware doesn’t? This remains the consumer’s MP3 player of choice – until, of course, something better comes along. Until then, I’m taking this with me everywhere. Company Website: http://www.creative.com Jukebox Website: http://www.nomadworld.com Community Website: http://www.nomadjukebox.net

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                15.09.2001 08:01
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                New MP3-player from Creative NOMAD Jukebox (second title for Europe D.A.P. Jukebox) is possible to name as the representative MP3-players of new generation. As the information carrier in it is used the hard disk. Due to such solution and many additional original functions, Creative Nomad Jukebox can become rather popular, because it really exceeds existing minidisks and CD-players. It is impossible to tell, that the main principles of work this device should be new. First player with the portable hard disk was manufactured last year, but it had many defects and too high cost. Creative Nomad Jukebox by a size and appearance reminds usual CD player. For interaction with the user the LCD-display and eleven buttons is intended. For connection with the computer is the USB-port. What is Jukebox from a technical point of view? Actually it not that other, as the computer working under operational system RTOS and containing memory, reprogrammable ROM and hard disk volume 6 Gbytes. The memory is used for work and for caching playing (antishock is about five minutes), ROM is used for boot-up and storage of seldom changed things (for example, algorithm of playing), other is stored on the hard disk. In produced now models the hard disk Fujitsu MHK2060AT is used. 6 Gbytes allows to save on it till 100 hours of music in MP3-files CD quality (128 Kbit/s). As a result, Jukebox quite approaches for portable sound library, where it is possible to store not only favorite tracks, but also generally music on all cases of life. Unfortunately, the replacement of the hard disk on a more capacious model is not stipulated, though theoretically of any restrictions on volume of disks in player is not exist. To transfer from computer to computer other data, besides music in stipulated formats will fail. Moreover, even in the following version player such possibility is not realized. The velocity of transfer data from PC to Jukebox is 500 Kb/s (on the average
                ). The program Creative PlayCenter 2.0 permit as copy ready files from the hard disk of the computer, and "grab" tracks immediately from the CD. Time of reading, the coding and copying full audio-CD is about 10 minutes. As the amount stored MP3-tracks can easy be bigger than 1000, before the developers there was a problem cataloguing content of player. The problem this was decided enough not bad. In spite of that files structure in Jukebox not hierarchical, the tracks in player are sorted for three criterions: title of an album, name and musical style. Is realized in player primitive search of tracks on a title. All information about current state player, help and the messages of system are mapped on a seven-string LCD-screen having illumination. Certainly, has not done without "firm" support of a 4-channel sound: two pairs of columns are connected. However a four-channel sound it is not present, there is only duplication of frontal channels on back columns. As if to delivered with player the headphones, they doubtlessly are better, than the headphones, with which are usually completed other MP3-players. Batteries are awful. Appetite at Nomad Jukebox is big to impropriety - 4 batteries to it are enough only on 4-5 hours. As if to accumulators, with them the time of continuous work is reduced for one hour. As to quality of reproduction and decoding of a sound, Jukebox does it, directly we shall tell, at a level is "be above the average. However there will be users, dissatisfied algorithm MP3 and files received compression on this algorithm. Especially for such people Creative Jukebox supports usual format WAV also. Jukebox is supplied with 8 Mb buffer DRAM, permitting to listen nonstop music in any conditions. So, Creative Jukebox is rather interesting and original device. However, it the realization is those, that on the present moment Jukebox has appeared is allocated defects, which actually d
                o not give is comfortable to use player in a portable mode. As if to stationary use, then Jukebox exhibits itself at height. Having support EAX, a possibility of storage till 100 hours of music and many other interesting technologies, Jukebox doubtlessly is one of the best digital audioplayer.

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                  05.09.2001 00:24
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                  The capacity is huge - nearly 6gb. Eqautes to over 100hrs of music in a device the size of a portable cd player. --------------------- Features Portable, multiformat compressed audio player 6 GB of built-in storage holds over 100 hours of CD quality music SDMI-compliant and supports MP3, WMA, and WAV file formats USB interface for fast digital transfer rate Weighs only 14 ounces and measures the size of a portable CD player Complete with soundjam for MAC users ------------------------ I've been using MiniDisc for sometime now, which accounts to about a year. My first impression of the Creative DAP was that it rather bulky. I quickly installed the software (Soundjam - which came free) and went about creating a series of mp3 files from my existing extensive CD collection. I tried both iTunes and Soundjam, and both are so and so packages. I've tried/tested/deleted and many other operations of this calibre with the unit and must say that I am particularly pleased with it. My only complaint is that as I am used to using MiniDisc this thing is rather bulky. But on the other side of the ocean if I wanted to carry around 150 albums, makes good thinking. The sound quality is excellent, the user friendliness is that of a person that likes to fuss rather than read instructions. This really is an A class product. My only gogglion is that carry cases are not yet available from UK creative labs website, but are from US website. If you spend hours looking through your CD's for the right music for your mood then this really is for you. Oh, and why does it come with a case that won't allow you to put the earphones in the same time, I will never know. All moans aside, you cant beat this. Superb

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                    19.08.2001 22:56
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                    • expensive

                    Computer-based digital recording is not anything mysterious; just toss together the basics - install a hard drive, CPU, RAM with a soundcard on a motherboard and add the right application software. As it happens, these are the same ingredients that make up Creative Labs' Nomad Jukebox, a hard-drive-based MP3 portable. While primarily intended for playback, the Nomad Jukebox includes recording capabilities. With the 6.4-GB hard drive and USB connectivity, this has the potential to be a terrific field recorder. USB is a relatively fast means to dump the data into a DAW for production. There is ample room to gather hours of uncompressed mono audio. It gets several hours of recording from standard AA batteries and is about the size of a portable CD player. Before you run out and buy one to replace your DAT, MiniDisc or cassette re-corder, please note my use of the terms "potential" and "should" above. The Nomad has all the elements of a terrific field recorder, but the quality of the consumer connectors and the A/D-D/A converters make for somewhat disappointing recordings. Recordings with pro microphones and cheap electret lavalieres alike were decent, but contaminated with a high-pitch howl and a cassette recorder-like hiss. This is likely due to RF pollution drawn into the unbalanced analog jack. Company officials indicated that these issues were being addressed and that later revisions would correct these obvious problems. While they are at it, add stereo recording plus metering capabilities. It would be wonderful if Creative took this basic concept and tuned it for field recording. With some modifications - and, of course, some added cost - the Nomad could be a popular and inexpensive field recorder for a variety of pro and semipro uses.

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                      12.07.2001 05:11
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                      Does anyone remember Cliff Richard’s ‘Millennium prayer?’ what a tune! Thought the millions of blue-rinsed death-cheaters that made working in a music shop then an absolute nightmare. They’d be snatching copies from the shelves faster than any music shop owner could fill them up again. Several of the chronologically gifted were even buying 20-30 copies each. Can you imagine that? Every copy on the shelves snapped up in a couple of transactions as the OAPSs engineered Cliff’s climb to the top with military precision. If you look at the economics of it, though, things start to look a bit more sinister. To buy 30 copies of Cliff’s epic would have cost our silver-haired brethren around a whopping £120. If they’d just nipped onto the internet they could have downloaded the Peter Pan of Pop’s opus for free and saved themselves an absolute bundle into the bargain. That’d be illegal of course and I’d never endorse such suspect activities, but if they had they could have stored around 1,500 copies of it on Creative Labs’ DAP Jukebox, enough to keep even the hardcore of cliff’s fans happy. All right so the majority of us would probably want to use the Jukebox’s mammoth 6GB of storage space for something a little more palatable, but you get the idea. You can store a good 150 albums worth of MP3 files on it which represents a fairly hefty percentage of anyone’s record collection and means you wont be stuck for something to listen to for weeks, or months even. The jukebox isn’t just an MP3 player either it’ll play WAV, WMA and AAC files too, as well as being able to record directly from CD, with no loss of quality, through a lineout input on the back of the unit. Even using this method you still get ten albums worth of true CD-quality music. Upgradeable firmware also means that you can download upgrades from Creative Website and update your Jukebox to play new forma
                      ts as they become available. Nice. The jukebox is a stylish little beast too. A little bulkier than most players thanks to the 6GB hard drive, but no larger than your average personal Cd player and better looking than most. Swathed in metallic blue and silver, and with a sizeable 7-line LCD, the jukebox manages to deliver both aesthetically and functionally. Connection to your PC (yet again Mac owners are left out) is via USB, which provides some stunningly fast transfer times. A 4mb file takes you just 11 seconds to transfer to the jukebox, so your looking for an entire album in about a minute an a half, which is mightily impressive. Creative has supplied an armada of file management, encoding, and playback software too, making its £350 seem a little bit more reasonable. The supplied creative play centre 2.0 software allows encoding a bit-rates up to 320kbps, more than any bundled software I’ve seen so far, although 128 kbps is acceptable. As far as playback is concerned the jukebox is an absolute belter. MP3 and WAV files sound the business despite the limitations of the solid-state formats, and direct line-in recording from CD are crystal clear. This is probably due to, in part at least, to creative’s decision to bundle a decent pair of headphones with the player. Infinitely better than the tiny earphones that most manufactures seem to favour. There’s only one cloud over the jukebox and that’s the battery life. You’ll get about 4 to 5 ours playback from the 4AA ceils, depending on how much playing around with the player you do during playback, although Creative will be supplying two sets of cells with the player. All in all, a superbly designed, great sounding bit of kit. Buy one, download Cliff’s next Christmas single, and give it to your gran. At least that’ll give those luckless record shop worker types a little breathing space.

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                        23.05.2001 04:27
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                        Looking more like your average personal CD player, Creative Labs' nifty Jukebox can nevertheless store up to 150 albums' worth of choons ound 1,500 copies of it on Creative Labs' new DAP Jukebox, enough to keep even the most hardcore of Cliff fans happy. Alright, so the majority of us would probably want to use the Jukebox's mammoth 6Gb of storage space for something a little more palatable, but you get the idea. You can store a good 150 albums' worth of MP3 files on it which represents a fairly hefty percentage of anyone's record collection and means you won't be stuck for something fresh to listen to for weeks, months even. The Jukebox isn't just an MP3 player, either, it'll play WAV, WMA and AAC files too, as well as being able to record directly from CD, with no loss of quality, through a line input on the back of the unit. Even using this method you still get ten albums' worth of true CD-quality music. Upgradeable firmware also means that you can download upgrades from Creative's Website and update your Jukebox to play new formats as they become available. Nice. The Jukebox is a stylish little beast too. A little bulkier than most players thanks to the 6Gb hard drive, but no larger than your average personal CD player and better-looking than most. Swathed in metallic blue and silver, and with a sizeable 7-line LCD, the Jukebox manages to deliver both aesthetically and functionally. Connection to your PC (yet again, Mac owners are left out) is via USB, which provides some stunningly fast transfer times. A 4Mb file takes just 11 seconds to transfer to the Jukebox, so you're looking at an entire album in about a minute and a half, which is mightily impressive. Creative has supplied an armada of file management, encoding, and playback software too, making its £350 price tag seem a little more reasonable. The supplied Creative Playcentre 2.0 software allows encoding at bit-rates up to 320Kbps, more th
                        an any bundled software I've seen so far, although 128Kbps is acceptable. As far as playback's concerned, the Jukebox is an absolute belter. MP3 and WAV files sound the business despite the limitations of the solid-state formats, and direct line-in recordings from CD are crystal clear. This is probably due, in part at least, to Creative's decision to bundle a decent pair of headphones with the unit, infinitely preferable to the tiny earphones most manufacturers seem to favour. There's tons of options to sift through as well: you can adjust the equalisation using the parametric EQ; adjust the playback speed without altering the pitch, and even add environmental effects like Hallway and Auditorium to the track to make it sound like it's being played live. Combine all this functionality with the fact that you'll be able to use it as a normal 6Gb external hard drive and the Jukebox looks like the sort of bargain you'd expect to find down your local pound shop (but rarely do). There is really only one cloud on the Jukebox horizon, and that's the battery life. You'll get between four and five hours playback from the 4 AA NiMH cells, depending on how much playing around with the unit you do during playback, although Creative will be supplying two sets of the cells when the unit hits the market in time for Christmas. All in all, a superbly designed, great sounding bit of kit. Buy one, download Cliff's next Christmas single, and give it to your Gran. At least that'll give those luckless record shop worker-types a little breathing space.

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                          20.04.2001 09:08
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                          My DAP has not left my side since the day I bought it. For the past five years I have been dragging a bag full of CDs around with me to friends houses, parties etc.. and people complain about it's weight! Its weight is not a problem, battery life however is but still much better than a CD walkman ( there has been talk on the creative DAP forum of a battery pack). The DAP is so much more than a personal stereo, you can store any type of data on it, you can get a casette adaptor for about 15 quid and use it as a car stereo and if you've got half a brain you can take out the 6gig drive and stick a twenty gig one in there . The support for the product by creative is unparalelled, they really listen to their customers and regulary improve the playcentre software because of customer recommendations. The software itself is pretty good aswell.

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                            12.04.2001 00:07
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                            Fantastic little device but just one problem - you can put your MP3s on but you can't take them back off !!! What I mean is you can delete them but you can't copy them off. What this means is if you have a large collection of MP3s and want to free up your hard disk then this is no good to you since you can't reload your disk with them later on :-( I would rather go for the Archos jukebox which has 6Gb (expandable to 20), is cheaper !! and acts like an external disk drive so you can store anything on it - mp3s, jpegs, documents etc

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                              02.04.2001 19:53
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                              What a great product - for years I have had about an hours journey each way from work on ublic transport, so I have been tied very closely to some form of personal audio over the years. Walkman - old technology, unreliable. Discman - reliable - but limited by the number of CD's you can carry. Plus antishock means that they sometimes jump. Minidisc - small light, but a pain to copy the tracks onto blanks. They also take ages to copy. Now along comes MP3 - quick to make - also once a song is ripped it stays on my hard disk ready for use. It is quick to copy the files onto the MP3 player, but up until now the capcity has been very limited. Finally along comes a player with a large capacity and seems to promise all the features that are really desired. So I order one, it arrives - I unpack it and start the 12 hour charge. Next morning I start playing with it, listening to a couple of the tracks on there, and after about 15 mins I check out the batteries, they are at about 75%. This alarms me and I use it for a while longer and it takes about an hour to run them down. On the forums on the web site the batteries are discussed repeatedly, this is a problem - however one that Creative do not appear to be doing much about. But one reliable option appears to be to buy a battery charger and charge the batteries outside of the MP3 player. This seems to produce longer lasting batteries than the internal charge itself. This does add another £15 to the cost but then it does mean that you can get the stated 4 hours out of one set of batteries. Apart from the batteries the unit is great, 5 mins antishock, easy to use menus, not too heavy, massive storage. The PC software is easy to use and very fast and efficient. I would recommend this to anyone - but be aware of the power consumption problems. *** Additional *** According to last nights Evening Standard 3/4/2001, there is a new model coming out in
                              the autumn, double the capacity, half the size and much better battery life. If you are undecided then I would suggest waiting for that.

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                            • Product Details

                              With a remarkable 10GB of storage, the NOMAD Jukebox can store an entire collection of digital music - over 2, 500 songs - in a compact, portable player that fits in the palm of your hand. It will revolutionize the way you listen to, store, and carry around your music. In stylish metallic blue, the NOMAD Jukebox is about the size of a portable CD player and can store more than 170 hours of CD-quality music. That's like having a 125+ CD changer in the palm of your hand!

                              NOMAD Jukebox 10GB supports the popular Windows Media (WMA) and MP3 digital music formats, is versatile and easy to use, and provides an extensive array of connections for you to listen to, record, and take your music wherever you go. A complete line of accessories is also available to personalize and extend the functionality of your NOMAD Jukebox. Like all Creative NOMAD Jukebox players, NOMAD Jukebox 10GB offers the best in portable digital audio technology.