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Dewalt DW004 7/8

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2 Reviews

This rotary hammer comes with a rotation-only mode for wood and metal drilling, and the factory-set clutch reduces sudden, high-torque reactions if the bit jams. The 360 degree side-handle adapts easily for tight spaces. An electro-pneumatic hammer mechanism permits drilling with less noise, vibration and engagement force than round shank hammer drills

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    2 Reviews
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      08.02.2009 21:09

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      excellent

      This drill is the bees knees and looks like one as well with its black and yellow colour this is the make of power tool that has changed the industry.With its sds system its one of the first to use the sds chuck but the power this machine kicks out is emence it will plunge through all types of concrete and hardcore with its 3 amh battery it does last for about 15 minutes continua s use then starts to run out but can still work on the other great thing about this tool is that the sds system is so easy to use where you just click the drill bit in. there are two different types of drilling as well there is drill and hammer drill as well as chisel for bricks and block removal which in fact it is not just any old drill this particular model comes in a 24v battery model but on ly in clude one battery. i would recommend this drill to all building tradesmen seeing as 110v is in the past and battery in now in thanks for listening.

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      14.02.2001 03:46
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      There’s something about a yellow-and-black power tool that makes you look the part. Maybe it’s because a lot of building site gear is that colour. The DeWalt SDS Plus Rotary Hammer Drill is one such piece of kit. Mine isn't the one in the photo, but it's obviously from the same range. Price-wise it’s definitely at the top-end of the amateur price range at £155 from Screwfix, so it has to be that bit more useful to justify the price. I was in the process of rebuilding the kitchen when I had a long hard look at my existing arsenal of power tools. The prospect of knocking another load of holes for electrical points using a hammer-action drill to mark out the perimeters and a cold chisel to do the rest filled me with no pleasure whatsoever. Then, whilst looking through the Screwfix catalogue for something else entirely, I stumbled across “SDS” drills. These have a newer type of chuck, enabling bits etc to be bayoneted into place with a single click, instead of tightened by the usual gear-and-key-driven one. This drill goes one better than that. Most people are aware of what a hammer-action drill can achieve, but have you considered what a drill that can hammer without rotating can do? Fit a cold chisel in the SDS bit, and it’s like having a mini “Kango” hammer at your disposal. The DeWalt does this. This really paid off when it came to cutting slots in the plaster for cables. The big danger was getting carried away! Also from Screwfix, I bought a two-part tool for cutting neat wall-box holes. This MUST be used in a rotary-stop drill like the DeWalt. Firstly, there is the borer. This looks like a Channel Tunnel boring machine for “00” scale trains. Just drill to 1.5 “ depth though, not the full 33 miles! Then turn off the rotary hammer action at the flick of a lever, and fit the second part, whch is a square metal box with s
      harpened edges. The stationary hammer action literally vibrates away the corners of the previously circular hole, et voilà, one electrical wall box with no ragged edges in about two minutes. The tool cost about £90 and is called a Box Sinker. The time and effort saved is amazing, but the borer creates considerably more dust than the traditional “muscle” method, partly negating the time saved. I digress....back to the drill. It has:- A torque clutch to prevent motor overload. 3 work settings - rotary, rotary with hammer and non-rotary with hammer. Electronic speed control in the trigger. Reversible action for screwdriving and “unscrewdriving”. A depth stop to prevent going in too deep. Chuckless bit-changing (SDS) A very long sturdy mains lead – very useful when up a ladder. A tough carrying case – sprinkle this with brick dust and emulsion for that authentic Bob The Builder look! The Pros and Cons ~~~~~~~~~~ For every day work, it’s expensive if all you want to do is put up a few shelves, but it has left me with a spare drill that now sits more or less permanently in a bench stand. Of course, if you get given one as a present……..it’s not at all expensive! Changing over to SDS-fitting bits and chisels could be pricey, but if you stick to what you need for the job in hand, these can be built up gradually. Your existing drill bits were going to wear-out anyway. Verdict ~~~~ Only buy a drill at this price if the non-rotary hammer action is going to be of immediate use. It can be, and has been very labour-saving. I’m glad I’ve got one since it covers everything except delicate work. I’m going to write about my Bosch cordless to cover that! The only thing that would have enhanced this drill further would have been a built-in spirit level.

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