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The Devil's Teardrop - Jeffery Deaver

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6 Reviews

Author: Jeffery Deaver / Genre: Crime / Thriller

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    6 Reviews
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      08.07.2013 00:00
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      A Deaver thriller thats worth a read.

      I do enjoy a good read, my genre is quite varied, I enjoy a easy to read chick lit but also enjoy the more challenging read of a good crime thriller. I am currently assignment writing in my spare time and generally ban myself when I should be studying, but today was a gorgeously hot day and I'd done all my "jobs" and the lawn mower has no petrol so decided to have a read in the garden.

      My husband had been to the summer fayre at school and had picked this book up second hand for a pound. It will set you back £5.99 new and with free delivery from Amazon.
      The details (from Amazon) are
      Paperback: 496 pages
      Publisher: Hodder Paperbacks; New edition edition (4 May 2000)
      Language: English
      ISBN-10: 0340712538
      ISBN-13: 978-0340712535
      Product Dimensions: 11.1 x 17.8 cm


      Anyway the book cover is bright red, with a black circle cut out and a black layer underneath. I have read quite a lot of Jeffrey Deaver books, especially his Lincoln Rhyme series, which can also be seen in the film adaptations, such as the bone collector, starring Denzil Washington.

      Jeffrey Deaver has his own website
      http://www.jefferydeaver.com
      He has written 31 novels, selling in 150 countries and in 25 languages. In my opinion his photo (in all his books) are quite scary looking. I enjoy his books but can at times be hard going, especially his Lincoln Rhyme books where he constantly goes over the clues, I find that I skip these bits as very repetitive. They are generally very well written and I have on occasion worked out who dunnit but his twists and turns are very good.

      This book took me about 4 hours to read, although I consider myself to read too quickly. It was enjoyable and kept me enthralled throughout.

      The storyline was based on New years eve, and a non descript man gunning down people in a metro station. We later realise that this massacre will be repeated every 4 hours until a ransom of $20 million is payed by the district of Columbia to the gun mans partner. The main characters include single parent Parker Kincaid, ex FBI agent who specialises in document analysis in the private sector, he has his own problems with his ex wife wanting custody of their children. We also meet agent in charge, Lukas, with her own set of ghosts. The story grips as we try and stop the gunman. We also get a cameo from the great Lincoln himself.

      I will give 4 Doo Yoo stars for a good thriller that kept me entertained whilst I enjoyed the sun.

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      22.06.2002 07:51
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      New Year’s Eve 1999, a madman opens fire with an Uzi in a crowded Washington DC subway, killing 23 people and injuring scores more. The shooter, known as The Digger, melts into the crowd and disappears. Shortly after, a note demanding $20,000,000 is delivered to the Mayor. If the ransom isn’t paid the extortionist says, the Digger will strike again and again until he is told to stop. In a bizarre twist of fate, the extortionist is run over in the street on the way to collect the ransom and killed. With no one left alive who knows the identity of the shooter or with the power to stop his murderous rampage, it is a race against time to catch the Digger before he kills again. Questioned document examiner Parker Kincaid, a former FBI agent and single father now working in the private sector, is called in to examine the note and help with the hunt for the killer. The following 373 pages are a tightly woven tapestry of suspense, horror, and twisty-turny bits that will make you gasp out loud. I don’t want to tell you too much more about the plot of the novel, because I don’t want to spoil it for you. Suffice it to say that all is not as it seems and the plot rockets along like a rollercoaster, dragging the reader into a surprising, stomach wrenching succession of twists, turns, sheer drops and loops. In my opinion, the denouement is a brilliant piece of sleight of hand that retains the element of surprise whilst remaining believable. Before this, I had only ever read Jeffery Deaver’s Lincoln Rhyme books. I am a huge fan of the quadriplegic criminalist, so when I realised The Devil’s Teardrop had a new lead character, I was slightly sceptical. It didn’t take long, however, to become absorbed in Deaver’s narrative. His descriptions are chilling, his characters are finely drawn and believable and his plot is intricate enough to satisfy without con
      fusing the reader. Parker Kincaid is a truly likeable character. His whole life revolves around, and is dedicated to, his two children. He has forsaken his FBI career to work from home authenticating historical documents so that he can be a full-time father. Unfortunately, his involvement in the highly dangerous Digger investigation coincides with a vicious attempt by his unstable, alcoholic ex-wife to gain custody of the children. Deaver’s heart-warming descriptions of Kincaid as a loving and caring father mean that the reader becomes emotionally invested in the character. You begin to care about Kincaid and that makes the following action all the more exciting. There is a gentle hint of possible romantic interest between Kincaid and FBI team leader Agent Margaret Lukas. Lukas is at first glance a tough, cold career woman, but she is hiding a tragic past – the loss of her beloved husband and son in an air crash. The romantic thread pulls tight under the surface of the narrative, hinting at a possible relationship until the final page. I get the feeling that Kincaid and Lukas are likely to surface again as a couple in later Deaver novels, in the same way that Lincoln Rhyme and Amelia Sachs have. The novel also has a supporting cast of interesting characters, including computer whiz Tobe Gellar and laconic and crusty FBI Agent Cage. The first chapter of The Devil’s Teardrop is so gripping that I didn’t want to put the book down. It opens with a stark and horrific description of the subway shooting, which then segues into a picture of domestic tranquillity that is Kincaid’s home life. The juxtaposition of the two is truly unsettling and this sets the tone for the whole novel. Set in the space of just one day, the last day of the millennium, the frenetic events take control of Kincaid’s carefully structured life, throwing both him and his family into danger. <br> But if the reader feels a real affinity towards Kincaid, the Digger and his master are so skilfully rendered by Deaver that they really do raise a shiver along the spine. The Digger is an incredibly emotionally and mentally damaged character, a truly chilling madman. The mastermind of the crime, the extortionist who controls the Digger, is, you come to realise, a truly twisted genius and a pure sociopath. The reader is hard pressed to decide who is truly the most evil – the puppet or the puppet master. Ultimately, I was surprised to find I had some sympathy for the Digger character, which turned out to be much more than a two-dimensional bogeyman figure. The “Devil’s Teardrop” of the title, in case you were wondering, is an unusual handwriting characteristic. It is the name for an unusually formed dot on top of a lower case letter I or j. Whilst most people form the dot by tapping pen on paper, or dragging the pen creating a dot with a left-to-right tail, the devil’s teardrop is formed by dragging the pen slightly upwards, creating a “teardrop” shaped dot. You learn something every day! This book is a thriller in every sense of the word and I heartily recommend it. Deaver has a talent for unusual description, natural unstilted dialogue and inventive stories backed with solid technical crimescene information, which added together, make his novels very believable and highly readable. The Devil’s Teardrop is published by in paperback by Coronet and is available from Amazon for £5.59.

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        07.02.2001 22:15
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        This Deaver bloke is a bit of a psycho! Having read a couple of his books, you get a real feel for this author's mind, and, well, I'd not want to bump into him in a dark alley! Scary bloke. The Devil's teardrop centres round an ex-FBI documents agent. He's called in to help with a New Year's Eve case with a "pay or my accomplice shoots the public at regular times" threat. Except that the ransomer is killed, leaving the shooter loose. You see, unless he hears from the ransomer, he keeps killing! In addition, the killer, all we are told is he’s “The Digger” and that he is not a particularly sharp person. In fact, pretty damn cold… The Ex-FBI agent is Parker Kincaid, who spends his time studying documents in his home for clients, and looking after his two kids. Taking the case on New Year’s eve is a real choker, as he has to lie to his children, to not worry them about the case. So we embark on a chase of the Digger, trying to gain clues where there seem to be none, to guess his next shooting locations. It is truly intense, the time limits until each shooting mean it is a real grasp for the agents to second-guess. And they do not get it right every time either. If you like the idea of the plot, there is also a HUGE twist near the end, which all good books should have. The real beauty is that “Devil's..” draws the reader into a deep world of FBI thinking and really gives insight into the thoughts and mindsets of the characters. Very good!

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        06.07.2000 16:46

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        Let me start with the negative. This story line towards the end falters slighty as it becomes a tad unbelievable. It seems as if he struggled a little in ending the story. Fortunately though, the one negative is out-weighed by the positives. Deaver has created another page turner of twists and turns. This time pitting retired FBI document examiner Parker Kincaid against a maniacal killer who's been unleashed on Washington DC on the eve of the new millenium. The madman, who conrols the killer and has set deadlines for ransom money, has been accidentally killed. Now Parker, teamed with a combined force of FBI and DC police, sets off to battle the killer as well as his own personal demons. With little clues to help, the must find and stop the killer before the next deadline which approaches ever so quickly. Once again Deaver creates charcters that grab your attention, making you feel for them and bond with them. You are instantly drawn into the story from page one. A quick and enjoyable read.

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        21.06.2000 17:38

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        This book just flows...... Many plot twists and the villan of the piece is not revealed right up until the end....unusual nowadays! The story begins with the mass slaying in a metro station, then a note is left at the mayors office saying it will happen again at 4, 8, and at midnight, the entrance to the new millenium, unless the ransom is paid. The FBI have a problem though, the man who delivered the note is killed in a hit and run. They now have no leads and no way to contact the killer to tell him to stop. The leads come from the note when Parker, an ex-agent is brought in to consult. I will say no more of the story, I don't want to ruin it for you. Needless to say, the twists in this are amazing, Deaver is definately an author I will read again.

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        21.06.2000 02:25

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        It's Millennium Eve in Washington, DC. A man gets onto an escalator in a crowded metro station and opens fire with a machine gun. He escapes and an hour later, a note is delivered to the Mayor. If a ransom of twenty million dollars is not paid, the killer will strike repeatedly. The writer of the note is suddenly identified, but there is no way to stop the killer, a separate person. The only clue that the FBI has is the note, and it is up to Parker Kincaid and Margaret Lucas to bring down the killer. The plot of the book is a good one and it is an interesting idea to have such an intriguing plot twist so early on. However, the twists do not stop there. Throughout the book, the reader is kept guessing, right up until the very end. However, the finish lets the book down. Whilst an ending should maintain the pace and be as good as the book that preceded it, the ending here was weak and unbelievable. Obviously, it will spoil it if I give any more details, but I think Deaver could have chosen a more believable one, not an ending that seems to be rooted in a fairy-tale. Parker's puzzles and the Digger's thoughts were a nice idea and I know that I did not work out Parker's riddle. The characters were quite well developed and it was a great idea to give Lincoln Rhyme a cameo appearance. If you are a fan of the Lincoln Rhyme novels, you should enjoy this just as much. It is a well-written thriller; it's just a pity the ending has a weak spot. I hope that with his next novel, Deaver will rectify this.

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