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Dragon Reborn - Robert Jordan

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Author: Robert Jordan / Genre: Sci-Fi / Fantasy

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    8 Reviews
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      09.11.2012 02:10
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      Really good if you've read the other two, but still a bit long.

      At the end of The Great Hunt, we left our heroes having defeated the Seanchan and send them fleeing across the sea back to their home. We have also seen Rand declare himself to be the Dragon Reborn, and fight Ishamael in the skies with another battle raging below him. The Dragon Reborn picks up from a short time after the battle, with Rand and about half of the main characters from the last story having made camp in the Mountains of Mist. The other half of the characters (Nynaeve, Elayne, Egwene and Mat) travel to Tar Valon to seek to separate Mat from the dagger, and to regain their studies after they were tricked into going to Falme.

      The story gets going fairly quickly, and is split into two fairly separate halves. Half of the follows Rand travelling from the mountains across the world attempting to fulfil prophecies of the Dragon, while the other half follows Egwene, Nynaeve and Elayne as they seek out members of the Black Ajah in the white tower. The story is generally compelling for the most part, though as with the last book I found parts to be a little lacklustre and tedious. However it is worth noting that these were only small sections that I did not enjoy, and the story as a whole is very well written and well thought out, with each character gaining more depth than in the last two books.

      The reason that many of the characters gain a lot of depth and back story is because tDR sees a large change in the way that it is told. In tDR, though Rand is the title character (and so you'd assume the main character), the amount of story seen from Rand's perspective is minimal, with most of the story being told by either Perrin or Egwene. This meant that rather than simply focussing on Rand, Robert Jordan was able to show the full emotions of the other characters as they go about their actions in the book. This is a theme that is then followed throughout the series, with some books focussing more on a particular character than others, but most being fairly evenly spread so that the story can be told from several different viewpoints to add depth. This is an extremely good part of the book and makes it very enjoyable to read!

      Overall this book is very enjoyable, with plenty of new characters (particularly the Aiel, who up until now have only really been mentioned) and many of the Forsaken make an appearance, though some only in name. The changing in viewpoints is very well done, and the feeling of urgency and desperation can really be felt as the characters seek to overcome near impossible odds! This is definitely worth reading if you have read the first two WoT books, but will absorb as much of your time as the others have.

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      17.06.2010 12:11
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      Classic fantasy fare

      The dragon reborn is the third book in the World of Time series of books written by the Robert Jordan. The book was published in 1991 and was the first of the series I can remember waiting to come out. The wheel of time has now stretched to its twelfth book and has outlasted its author who died last year, we are still waiting for the end and the last three books are being co-written by Brendan Sanderson.

      The Dragon Reborn

      tDG is the third book and continues the tale of Rand Al'thor who has the voice of the dragon Lews Theron in his head, though doubts it's real. Lews imprisoned the dark One 2000 years earlier but at the moment of triumph is sent mad by the Dark one and kills himself. As a final act, the dark one taints the male side of the Source and means any man who wields the source will go mad from the corruption of the power.

      In the previous two books, a female sorceress called Moiraine finds Rand Al'Thor who she believes is the Dragon Reborn and will fight the last fight against the dark one. Rand and his friends are therefore pulled out of their little village and sent out into the world to make their mark and prepare for the final days.

      Main characters

      Rand - In the first two books, the books are written in his perspective. He can channel the tainted source and has a strange voice in his head which believes its Lews Theron, the former Dragon.

      Matt - Rand's childhood friend, he's a Ta'avaran or a person who can change the thread of time by being present at an event. He is inherently lucky and has an eye for the ladies. He is still ill from finding a corrupt dagger.

      Perrin - Another of Rand's friend and a Ta'avaran like Matt has a strange bond with animals.

      Nynaeve - The villages former wise women, she can channel and has powers which she can't understand

      Egwene - She is the girl who would have been Rand's wife if events hadn't taken them away from the village. She can also channel and has real leadership abilities.

      Moiraine - An Aes Sedai, the Aes Sedai are a group of female source wielders, she is a member of the blue Sedai who look for the dragon and seek to aid him in his battle with the evil one.

      Lan - Moiraines warder, a huge man who is considered by some as the best fighter alive. He is devoted to his bonded Aes Sedai Moiraine.

      The Dragon Reborn

      After the first two weeks we have moved away from the small village in which the books begin, in the first we explored Rand's powers and in the second it's more on the importance of his friends. So in this is the third book we have far more idea about what their roles are and start to find out their futures.

      This book features the Aes Sedai far more than the first two and introduces us to the concept of different Aes Sedai all in different coloured ajah or clan so we are introduced to the bookish browns, the men hating reds, the gardeners yellows etc and also the concept of a hidden secret black ajah. The black are follows of the dark one but don't officially exist. As half of the main characters in the books are channelling young women, the importance of the Aes Sedai is only second to the fate of Rand in the subsequent novels.

      They Aes Sedai live in the White Tower of Tar Valon and it is there that Matt is finally freed from the dagger he picked up in the first novel. The novel moves toward a rather satisfying battle at the mountain city of tear which in truth has echoes of the battle of Helm's Deep in LOTR. At the battle, we find out more about the forces of darkness and the influences of three Ta'avaran all being in the same place and at a time when time itself can be altered. It is at the climax of the battle that the futures of Rand, Matt, Perrin and the rest are determined and they finally leave the young people from the village far behind.

      The dragon reborn is a strange novel because it is the first novel in the series which isn't written in the perspective of Rand but instead is written as a first person narrative of people around him. This style of writing will become the norm from this book onwards as the list of main characters slowly increases and the exposure of the reader to Rand starts to decrease. Whether, this is for the better is arguable but here in this novel it works well because it back fills the story on why the battle is happening and allows Rand to become a more peripheral figure despite being the main focus for this novel.

      This book also introduces us to the enigmatic Aiel, the Aiel will become increasingly important and are a band of desert living soldiers who are born to fight and have very tight rules on the concept of honour. They will slowly dominate the books from this point on but it's here at the final battle of this book that we finally meet them in any real sense, before that they had been mentioned as a menace from over the desert and are the reason for Rand's existence. The Aiel are a classic Spartan style nation who believe in the purity of battle and whose culture is based on the honour of battle, they also have women who can channel and their influence on Egwene in particular will only grow.

      The dragon reborn is my favourite novel in the Wheel of Time series, it has much to admire about it. The books has a nice flow explains a fair bit about the back story and why Rand is important and ends with a very satisfying battle. From this point, the books get longer and the list of characters increases but for me the stories in each novel becomes overstretched and rather ponderous but here the story is fast paced and exciting.

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      12.07.2009 23:11
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      Another Classic

      The Dragon Reborn is the third book in the epic Wheel of time series by fantasy writer Robert Jordan. This book came out back in October 1991. By the time this third book came out fans of the series were well and truely hooked. People snapped the book up quickly so they could continue the story, so Jordan was sure of his book selling very well, and it did. This was another big hit for the author.

      So the story again begins carrying on where we left off in the previous book, the great hunt. We follow Mat Cauthon who is taken to Tar Valon who is in need of some help after getting himself into more trouble, after being stabbed by a dagger in Shadar Logoth which contained powerful magic. This is one of the major storylines.

      Then we have Rand who is now getting the hang of his powers and battles with the evil Forsaken in the Stone of Tear. Rand takes up Callandor a crystal sword which proves he is the Dragon reborn. This is of course the main storyline running through all the books.

      I enjoyed this book and think it is slightly better than the last one. It still has lots of complicated stories but I found this one a little easier to follow.

      Robert Jordan is a wonderful story teller. He can really make the story jump off the page and come to live. I love the little maps you get in the book that make it so much easier to put yourself there and picture the landscape.

      Jordan also has a good way of describing any action, even though there may be loads of things going on, he puts you in the middle of the action so you feel like you can see and feel everything.

      There are some good new characters that come out in this book, and as usual Jordan is excellent at developing the characters and helping us get to know them and we really start to love them. You feel there emotions and really enjoy finding out what is going to become of them.

      This is another book I am sure you will enjoy if you are into your fantasy fiction. Robert Jordan is one of the best fantasy writers I have read and after reading this I just was desperate to get into the next book. You do need to remember this is the third book in the series so you can't really read it on its own as it won't make a lot of sense. You really need to read the other two books first to pick up the story. Don't let that put you off though in anyway!

      So go get yourself a copy of this and enjoy the wonderful world that Robert Jordan created for us all!

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      20.04.2009 21:33
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      well written story

      The series clearly has been given some thought by its experienced author. There are mysteries and solutions to these mysteries introduced in the very first book but which do not catch into the running plot until later. By the time you are turning the pages of the Dragon Reborn you are nicely hooked in.
      The problem is that there are a lot of pages to turn. Heck, no, I'm not saying the book is too large. What I am saying is that the story telling does tend to lumber slowly on and the reader generally knows there are eight (soon to be nine) books in the series. You have to be daft if you think that by the end of book three everything will be Peaches and Cream. Reading through the series from the start becomes something of an epic task in its own right.

      I do like the books, really. I do like the plot and I do like some of the characters. Some of the characters, that is, and unfortunately I'm not too keen on dear old Rand. (What sort of name is that, anyway?) From what I've gathered from other people who have also read the books that Rand is far from their favourite character either. That's something of a shame as it makes the plot a little more prone to dragging. Whenever Rand starts on a whining diatribe I start to get bored.
      Heroes should not whine. Heroes might whine in real life but when I pick up a fantasy book I want fantasy. Jordon will have to fight to mix heroic fantasy in with dark, angsty fate (the threat of madness).

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      14.06.2008 00:06
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      A must-read for any fan of fantasy books

      The Dragon Reborn is the third book in Robert Jordan's excellent fantasy series called The Wheel of Time and it is, in my opinion, one of the finest fantasy series ever written.

      The Wheel of Time is the tale of a world where time repeats itself and the dramas of history are re-enacted but with different faces and different stories each time. In this book, Rand al'Thor the book's protagonist travels across a distrustful and deceitful world full of dangers to the city of Tear where he must draw Callandor, the Sword that is Not a Sword from its incredibly well-guarded chamber, in order to realise his destiny and take the first step on fulfilling a prophecy that will put him face to face with the dreaded enemy, the Dark One.

      The book has a strong plot that is gripping from beginning to end. Jordan's writing style is magnificent and full of some amazingly well-crafted imagery and descriptions that help to bring to life the world of the wheel of time with its diverse peoples and cultures. The characters are complex and developed very well while every 'side story' reveals some interesting and relevant information regarding the main plot.

      I highly recommend the wheel of time series to all fans of fantasy books as it is an incredibly deep and well-crafted piece of literature.

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        12.03.2002 18:30
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        There's something terribly familair about this business of a sword trapped in a stone, even if the 'stone' is actually a fortress. Here all parallels with Arthurian fantasy end, as we embark on book three of Robert Jordan's mind bendingly detaled series. I'm going to try and write this so that it makes good sense even if you aren't reading the books, however, this means there will be spoilers for the first two books - so if you are planning to read them eventually, this might ruin a surprise or two. It's either that, or make no sense to most people. That's the trouble about writing about a series.... I'm also going to have pair the plot right down, or we could be here for a very long time. Rand thought he was an ordinary lad until a strange woman who could weild magic turned up in his village. (first book) Since then, he's been out in the world travelling with childhood friends and making a good number of enemies. He's fought 'the dark one' and lvied. (second book) If the prophesies are right, Rand is the dragon reborn, the man returned to fight the evil one in the last great battle. The trouble is that prophecies are vague, and Rand is having trouble seeing himself as the man dstined to destroy the world in order to save it. To find out what he is, once and for all, Rand sets out to try and fulfil a prophecy - that when the people of the dragon come to the Stone of Tear, the stone will fall and the magical sword in it will be his. The Stone is a heavily guarded fortress, he has no idea who the people of the dragon are supposed to be, but he's going to try anyway. Rand leaves his friend Perrin, and the magic user Moiraine who has been trying to guide him, and makes his own way to Tear. Moiraine and Perrin are close behind though and not about to get left out. Rand's old friend Mat is also being drawn towards Tear, hoping to protect a Princess from a plot against her life.
        The princess in question, Elayne, is also a magic user, travelling with Rand's childhood sweetheart Egwene, and village wise woman Nynaeve. The three women start out by visiting Tar Valon, home of the magic using women, (Aes Sedai) where they learn of a faction serving the dark one. The Aes Sedia are supposed to be the good guys. Despite their being relatively new to it all, the three are sent off to track down the black Ajah, the women who mean to kill Rand or turn him over to the dark one. In Tear, everything must be resolved, one way or another. This is the third book in a series, and you really can tell. It doesn't stand alone, following threads of plot that began in previous books. Of the three I've read so far, it has been my least favourite - it doesn't add as much new stuff to think about as earlier books, a great deal of it is concerned with people running round the country, and it is moderatly predictable. Enjoyable enough, but not startling in comparison to the first two. The main problem I have is that Rand is driving me mad - think of Luke Skywalker whining in the first Star wars film and you've got the gist of it. Moiraine is smug and infuriating, and the characters I do like - Perrin, and Nynaeve and Loial, are just bit parts in this one. This might well just be me, so I wouldn't let it put you off too much. I have started the next one, and it does seem to have picked up - a review of that should follow in a week at most. As high fantasy goes, this is pretty good stuff - no unpronouncable barbarians, not too much of the old 'it is your destiny' rountine - well, people try to tell Rand what his destiny is, but he's fighting it all the way. There hasn't been a hint of a dwarf, or an elf, and the politics are well considered and fascinating. It has far more depth and detail than most fantasy novels I've read. Given this book on its own, I might not be inclined to recomm
        end it, but overall the series seems to be good, and to make sense of any of it, you've got to read them all in order. Expect this to be a bit less gripping, but I suspect it will be worth it in the long run.

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          18.09.2001 00:19
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          Once again, I’ll start by saying that if you have plans on reading the Wheel of Time series, you might not want to read this, as it probably gives away some of the outcomes from the first couple of books in the series, The Eye of the World and The Great Hunt. This is the third book in Robert Jordan’s Wheel of Time series, which will eventually encompass 12 novels (or so I’m told), nine of which are currently available. There’s no point in reading this book unless you’ve read its two predecessors, as you’ll be completely lost as to what’s going on – this is very much a series, with one book following on from the last, and not something you could pick up very easily midway through. That being the case, I didn’t want to spend too much time explaining the series again – go back at look at someone’s opinion on The Eye of the World (or even The Great Hunt) or the series in general if that’s what you’re looking for. Hmm… don’t mean to sound so brusque there, but I’m sure nobody wants to hear me repeat myself. Still, I suppose it wouldn’t hurt to remind you what’s happened up to this point, although an apology for how long that makes this op… *THE STORY SO FAR* As the Wheel of Time weaves the threads of lives into the Pattern, three ta’veren are found in one sleepy village. A ta’veren is an individual around whom the Wheel “weaves all surrounding life threads” (as is says in the glossary). In other words, these are significant people with an influence on the lives around them, not to mention a ‘destiny’. The three – all male, Rand, Mat and Perrin – are persuaded to leave their village by Moiraine, an Aes Sedai, who has spent about 16 years searching for an individual who matches a prophecy. (Sorry if this sounds like a plug for another op, but you can find a bit of the story
          of the start of Moiraine’s search in a story called New Spring in a collection of fantasy stories, called Legends.) Where was I? Oh yes: Aes Sedai are people who can channel the True Source – use magic, in other words. In fact, they’re all women, as the history of this world has seen a taint placed on the male side of the True Source, so any man who channels is eventually driven mad. Such men are considered dangerous, and so are ‘gentled’ – stopped from being able to use this power – usually by a sect of the Aes Sedai known as the Red Ajah. We soon discover that Rand can channel – and in fact, may be the Dragon Reborn: a reincarnation of a powerful man, who was indeed driven mad whilst trying to fight the Dark One. In the first of the series, The Eye of the World, we follow the three boys as they start their quest. Also along for the ride are Moiraine’s Warder – a warrior protector – and from the same village as the boys, Egwene and Nynaeve, who discover they can channel and thus are hoping to become Aes Sedai. Along the way, Mat inadvertently puts his life at risk by picking up a dangerously evil dagger, and Perrin finds he has a bond with wolves. Events culminate when the group find the legendary Horn of Valere and the banner of the Dragon, and Rand wins a fight against the evil Ba’alzamon. Book two, The Great Hunt, picks up the action when the Horn and Mat’s dagger are stolen. Without the dagger Mat will die, and the Horn of Valere is reputed to bring legendary heroes back from the dead for the last battle against the Dark One. And so starts a new quest for our group, who are split up only to be brought back together for the climax. Mat sounds the Horn of Valere, and in doing so links himself to it so that, while he lives, only he can call back the heroes from legend. Rand once more fights Ba’alzamon, who obviously wasn’t as vanquished as we thought. Of cou
          rse, Rand wins (again), and is proclaimed as the Dragon Reborn. Phew… all that and I haven’t even started written about the right book yet!! *THE DRAGON REBORN* The third instalment of the series, The Dragon Reborn, starts a little more slowly than its predecessor, The Great Hunt. The climax of that left me feeling we were poised on the brink of greater events, but Jordan instead introduces a pause. The group is once more split, and winter has passed since our last visit. Moiraine has had Rand, Perrin and the Shienaran warriors wait out the cold in the mountains, as various factions in the rest of the world fight amongst themselves – mostly over the news of a new Dragon. For a large part of this novel, it feels as though the pace has been slowed down quite a bit. This is, I feel, probably for the best, as a certain level of excitement and drama can become tedious – not to mention incredibly unbelievable (note to self: um, as if the rest of it is fact!) – after a while. Still, I didn’t find myself becoming bored with this book: there was always something waiting to be discovered, and this keeps you reading. The excitement levels do increase, but to be honest, it wasn’t a sudden drama that I noticed outright – more, having finished the book, I know there was a build up of tension, just not exactly when it started. So far in the series, Rand has very much been the focal point, to the extent that it almost feels surprising when other characters are given significant attention. In this book, however, it is Rand who is pushed to the margins. He remains a hub for the actions of the other characters, but Rand himself only features in a few scenes, despite his importance to the story. Instead, then, we follow the other characters, and thus learn more of this world Robert Jordan has created. For example, through Egwene, Nynaeve and Elayne (who joined them in the previous instalmen
          t), we begin to get a better understanding of the Aes Sedai and their training system. The three return to the White Tower of Tar Valon after escaping the Seanchan (sigh… this is not a spell checker friendly opinion!). Their homecoming is not as pleasant as they had imagined: not only are they punished for going missing for so many months, but the threat of the evil Black Ajah is everywhere. This adds real tension to the plot, as even the reader begins to suspect any or all of the Sisters of being in league with the Dark One. Mat has also wound up at Tar Valon, deadly ill from the taint of the Shadar Logoth dagger. Mat’s bluff exterior never really works for me: he pretends that his good deeds have ulterior motives, but he’s never been anything other than nice. It’s only a minor point, though. As the story unfolds, Mat begins to discover that his luck is anything but ordinary, and Moiraine – and perhaps the reader – is forced to acknowledge that he and Perrin really are ta’veren, despite being overshadowed by Rand. Perrin is also making self-discoveries. Despite being the focus of a good part of the book, he has a lesser role in influencing events. As he is travelling with the largest part of the group still together, he seems more to be pulled along. Here we see more of his reaction to his newfound affinity with wolves, and it is also through Perrin that we are shown the fruition of some of Min’s prophecies. Min, if you remember, could see images around people. Although she didn’t understand most of what she could see, the images always had some significance in that person’s life. With his characters placed, Jordan weaves the story very well. I’ve noticed a pattern to the three novels I’ve read so far of the Wheel of Time series: Jordan splits the group of ‘heroes’, then brings them together again for the climatic fight between Rand and Ba’alzamon. D
          espite this pattern, however, it doesn’t make events in each book too foreseeable: yes, we can suspect the group will be reunited, but knowing the Rand will triumph seemed fairly obvious from the outset – this is not a genre given to surprise killings of the hero! I found this book more enjoyable than either of its predecessors. Partly, at least, that will be down to becoming more familiar with the characters and the world in general, but it also flows together very well. Jordan no longer has to introduce or explain certain elements: they are picked up from earlier instalments, before disappearing again – at least for now. I’ll say again that this is very much a part of a series, and not something to read out of context, but it’s a really good block in the story. Once again, I reached the end of this novel and felt that something even more dramatic was yet to come; I had planned on having a break and reading a different book before continuing with the series, but once again, I’m left wanting more… “It’s not a story…The Wheel weaves us into the Pattern. You chose to tangle your thread with ours; it’s too late to untangle it now.”

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            21.04.2001 20:52
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            As the title suggests Rand is beginning to realise he should proclaim himself to the world. This is the first book of the series that really settles into the groove that Jordan uses from here on in. There are a lot of characters in different parts of the world doing things that effect each other in a realistic world spanning way. Jordan keeps track of them all well and moves between them oftne enough to follow but spends enough time with each group to be satisfying. The Aiel have come over the Dragon wall and the whole book drives towards a great climax which is written well and paced more like the first two books. This is a very good book and a very satisfying read, beware if you read this you will want to carry on the series which is long. The next book is The Shadow Rising.

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        • Product Details

          Third volume in the 'Wheel of Time' series.