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The Great Hunt - Robert Jordan

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Author: Robert Jordan / Format: Paperback / Date of publication: 25 June 1992 / Genre: Fantasy / Publisher: Little, Brown Book Group / Title: The Great Hunt / ISBN 13: 9781857230277 / ISBN 10: 1857230277

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    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    7 Reviews
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      07.11.2012 00:59
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      Good follow on from the first, but can seem a bit long...

      The Great Hunt picks up from where the Eye of the World left off, and though it starts off fairly slowly, the different story arcs do pick up quite a pace and continue the story well! The book has more character separation than the first, with Egwene and Nynaeve travelling off to Tar Valon to learn to become Aes Sedai and Rand, Mat and Perrin moving off to Illian to present the Horn of Valere (found at the end of the first book). The book sees the development of minor characters from the first book (such as Elayne Trakand the daughter-heir of Andor, and Min Farshaw) and the introduction of new characters and enemies (such as the introduction of the mysterious Forsaken, the widely denied Black Ajah and even a whole new race of people).
      This is a great book, adding a darker tone to many of the characters as they begin to doubt themselves and worry about the future! It also shows many new areas and develops the magic of Saidar and Saidin much more than in the first I thought.
      There were some little annoyances with this book I found, as I found that half of the characters' stories (the half following the Horn) were much more interesting and gripping than the other half (in the White Tower), though by the end of the book the balance had been reset and I was thoroughly invested into all sides of the story!
      To conclude, the Great Hunt is an excellent addition to the series, furthering the plots and leaving the story with a good premise for the next book in the series.

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        15.06.2010 17:24
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        Enjoyable fantasy fare

        The Great Hunt is the second novel in the Wheel of Time series and is the first true book in the series. The first can be read in certain ways as a one off with an ending, this can be viewed in a cynical way as a book which could stand on its own if the book wasn't successful but it was a success and so the author was asked to continue the series. Here we get the Great Hunt and learn more about the setting of the Wheel of Time, the countries involved and the development of the young characters in the first book.

        The first book - The Eye of the Wheel introduces us to the main characters of Rand Al thor, Matt Cauthon, Perrin Aybara, Nynaeve, Ethlana Trakand and Egwene. These are the young people who we will follow for the rest of the books and whose roles become increasingly important and complex. Along with them we meet the female wizard Moiraine and her warder Lan, she is the young peoples guide at the beginning and belongs to a group of female wizards called Aes Sedai. The power they yield is the female half of the source but the dark one corrupted the male side when he lost the last great battle with the Dragon Lews Thewin. At the point of victory the Dark one is imprisoned but sends Lews mad and corrupts the male side of the source making it unusable.

        So at this point in the series we are told that any male wielders of the source are viewed as being corrupt by the Aes Sedai and they go out of their way to find these men and prevent them from using the Source. Rand is a man who it becomes apparent can wield the male side of the Source and is therefore one which the Aes Sedai wish to control, along the way we find out that Nynaeve, Elayne and Egwene are all power wielders of the female side of the Source.

        The point of the novel is more classic fantasy staples, Matt Cauthon is ill because he picked up a infected dagger in the previous novel to overcome the danger they must find the mythical horn of Valere which can cure Matt from his affliction. So the team set off to find the Horn and turn Matt back from the corruption, along the way we visit the White tower of the Aes Sedai for the first time and meet the head of the Aes Sedai Siuan who will become a more prominent character as the books progress.

        This book continues the decent start we found in the first novel, its pretty solid fantasy fare and doesn't get away from the basics too often. Here we meet strange invading armies, the concept of the black Sedai, and the growth of the young people in their understanding of their powers. The novel features the evil trollocs and myddrall who are the agents of the dark one along with the corrupt pedlar Fain who is Rand's main protagonist.

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        12.07.2009 18:31
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        Another Great Book

        The Great Hunt is the second book in Robert Jordans epic The Wheel of Time series. This book continues from where the first book, The eye of the world, left off. It came out back in November of 1990 and was snapped up by fans of the first book who were eager to continue the story.

        Again this book starts off with a prologue which when you read it does not make much sense and is a little confusing. But as the book progresses it starts to make sense and you can understand why it's good to have that early background knowledge.

        The book itself tells a few different stories. We have the three main characters Rand, Matt and Perrin who join with the Shienaren soldiers in the hunt for the Horn of Valere. You also have the story of the other characters from the Two Rivers, Egwene al'Vere and Nynaeve al'Meara. Then also the young Elayne Trakand who all go to the White Tower in Tar Valon to train to be Aes Sedai (magic wielders). And we also hear about another group of people who start an attack on the Western coast.

        I really enjoyed this book but found it hard sometimes to keep up with all the different threads of story. There is so much going on it's hard to keep track of who is doing what. I think it is just a little bit over complicated by this. All the different story lines are important but even so, I think Jordan just has to much going on.

        That said it's still a great book. The way he develops characters is second to none. We feel like we are becoming emotionally involved with the main characters and we really feel there emotions as we move through the story.

        Again Jordan is awesome at putting you in the story. His decriptions of the lands where the story takes place are so detailed. You can really see yourself there along with the characters.

        I notice in the picture on this review its a very old fashioned looking cover. The books I have in this series are all black with a symbol on the front. Each book has a different colour of writing and on the spine it has the number in the series. I know this is only a small point but I like the way they look when there sat on my shelf! So it does matter to me.

        If you read the first book in this series I'm sure you won't need any encouragement to take up the second book. If you have never read any Robert Jordan this is a series anyone who enjoy fantasy will really enjoy. This is for me one of the classic epic series' of books and one that can be enjoyed by anyone!

        So curl up on the couch, draw the curtains and emerse yourself in the wonderful world that Jordan has created!

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        10.06.2008 21:31
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        You must read this book if you love fantasy!

        The second book in Robert Jordan's epic saga of good and evil is actually one of the best in the Wheel of Time series.

        Set in the a mystical world populated with weird creatures and powerful magicians called Aes Sedai, the Wheel of Time tells the story of a land where time repeats itself, each time with some new faces and some old.

        This book is all about recovering the Horn of Valere which is rumoured to summon heroes of the past to the present day where they would fight on the good side in the Last Battle. It is in this book that Rand al'Thor, the Dragon Reborn, comes face to face with the Dark One (or so it seems anyway).

        Robert Jordan's elegant and eloquent writing style makes it the book a joy to read with some absolutely magnificent and vivid imagery that bring the world of The Wheel of Time to life in your mind. Jordan's characters are as complex as ever and his mastery of storytelling is great.

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        06.03.2002 18:11
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        This is the second book in a series, and its the kind of series that isn't going to make a whole lot of sense unless you read the first book. With some series, (think Harry Potter) you can outline what's happened before to a passable degree, but these books are just too huge. For reasons of my sanity as much as yours, I'm going to assume that either you've read the first book "The Eye of the World" or you don't mind being plunged in at the deep end. I'll try to make this make sense..... A legendary horn has been found, the horn of Valere. The legend goes that when sounded, the dead heros of old will rise up to fight. The problem is, the fight on the side of the horn blower. The horn is first found by a group of would be adventurers (in book 1), and they are set on taking it to its rightful home, when it is stolen during a violent raid. The theif is known to be a particularly nasty peice of work who might or might not be working for the biggest bad guy we've seen so far. Other things are stolen as well, things that could casue the deaths of some of the friends involved. Rand al Thor (might have a destiny but still thinks he's just a shepherd) Mat (who urgently needs to retrieve a dagger that's been stolen) Perrin, who can talk to wolves, and Loial, an Ogier (half giant sort of thing), set out with a magic user called Verin (Aes Sedia for those reading the series) a man who can sniff out violence, and a whole host of armed blokes. The chase leads them across country, into other worlds, different cultures and a huge political mess. Meanwhile, several young women who are friends with the young men - Nynaeve, Elayne, Egwene and Min, are all tricked into leaving their training as Aes Sedia, and going on a mission to aid the lads. The trip has ' trap' marked clearly on it, but none of them seems to notice until its to late. Their plot is woven into the fate awatign the lads, and onl
        y some serious smart thinking and courage is going to rescue them. The book is littered with familair faces from the fist book, and expands well on the cultures and politics. The plot hops about all over the place, with no shortage of surprises, puzzles and openings for the rest of the series. Who will sound the horn, and what will happen when they do? Does sounding the horn really mark the beginning of the last battle before the destruction of the world, or is it going to be more complicated than that? Who is the mysterious woman in what looks like a nighty who appears on the front cover, and who crops up at unlikely moments to pester Rand? On the whole very good - impossible to put down, enthralling, and now I'm going to have to start the next one....

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          09.09.2001 01:16
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          I’m not planning to have any big ‘spoilers’ in this op (well, there’s a few on the back of the book – I’m allowed those!). If you have plans on reading the Wheel of Time series, you might not want to read this though, as it probably gives away some of the outcomes from the first in the series, The Eye of the World. If you’re not familiar with the Wheel of Time, it’s an epic fantasy tale, which (or so I’m told) will eventually be twelve novels. Nine of these are already available, and this is the second instalment. I think a good way to explain a fantasy world is by examining it’s basic theology: Robert Jordan obviously can manage this better than me, so here’s a quote from the book’s glossary: “Wheel of Time, the: Time is a wheel with seven spokes, each spoke an Age. As the Wheel turns, the Ages come and go, each leaving memories that fade to legend, then to myth, and are forgotten by the time that Age comes again. The Pattern of an Age is slightly different each time an Age comes, and each time it is subject to greater change, but each time it is the same age.” (note: I honestly hadn’t read that before I wrote my opinion on The Eye of the World – I wasn’t too far off with my explanation!) The Pattern is the weave of lives, each life being a thread, as woven by the turning of the Wheel. Occasionally, webs (i.e. changes) form in the Pattern, centred around one or more individual who will go on to influence the people and events around him or her. The series follows three such individuals, Rand, Mat and Perrin. Initially from a sleepy village, the three boys are soon swept up in an adventure: the obligatory quest and fight against evil that crops up in most fantasy fiction. All this we learn in the first book of the series, The Eye of the World, and of course, this isn’t an opinion on that book, so let me move on
          swiftly. This isn’t a book you could really read without having read the preceding instalment. Jordan doesn’t bother rehashing prior events, or re-introducing the characters. Personally, I found this quite a relief. I’d only just finished Eye of the World, so I didn’t need or want to go over everything again – something I’ve found annoying in other series. Picking up where Eye of the World left off, with our little group still at Fal Dara, Jordan plunges us straight into the action. From the sinister prologue to the suspense in the opening chapters, don’t expect to put this book down too soon! After reuniting his main group of characters for the climax of Eye of the World, Jordan breaks them up again pretty quickly. Egwene and Nynaeve head off to Tar Valon with a group of Aes Sedai, while Rand, Mat and Perrin join the soldiers hunting for the stolen Great Horn. The dagger from Shadar Logoth has also been stolen, and Mat will die without it – ooh, the tension!! :) From the beginning of the first book, Rand is made the centre of activity. I like the fact that the other characters aren’t entirely marginalized, each getting a couple of chapters in turn to follow their own, albeit connected, exploits. Having split the story in this way, as well as picking up a few new characters, The Great Hunt jumps back and forth to keep up with these different elements. There were a few occasions when I started a chapter not quite remembering where the plot last left that character, but I didn’t feel left floundering for long. However, Rand very much IS the focal point, so most of the time we’re following him. In between, we start to explore more of this world: we begin to see more of the Aes Sedai and their colour-coded structure, for example. About halfway through the book (chapter 22 to be precise), there is a brief mention of Moiraine and Lan’s first meeting.
          The full version of this event is told in ‘New Spring’, a short story available in a book called Legends. You can take this as a shameless plug for my op on that book if you want, but I know I always like to see bits of background and history from a series I like, so I’m passing it on. Also around the halfway point, Jordan introduced a threat from a new source – or a new thread in the Pattern, to use the book’s terminology. There was the risk of this seeming contrived so far into events, but it’s handled excellently, and turns the tension up a notch. I do however wonder if things end up a little too ‘neat’ – arghh, I can’t say more without giving some of the plot away! One thing I did find slightly annoying was the characters’ oblivion to some of the dangerous situations. Okay, so the drama of the plot demands their ignorance, but the reader is made more than aware of what’s going on – it was enough to make me want to hit one of them over the head or shout “look behind you!” at the idiotic blind acceptance shown by Rand and his companions. On a more positive note, I found that The Great Hunt didn’t leave me making as many comparisons to Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings as I did when reviewing Eye of the World. However, there are more than a few similarities to the Sword of Truth series by Terry Goodkind: the sul’dam and collared damane are reminiscent of both the Mord-Sith and the Sisters of Light, who also resemble the Aes Sedai. Rand and Richard have much in common, as do the Children of the Light and the Blood of the Fold. Of course, the Wheel of Time came first, so I’m not criticising Robert Jordan – but if you’ve already read the Sword of Truth series, you’ll find quite a few familiar elements here. The overall impression I have of this book bodes well for the rest of the series. Once again I wa
          s impressed with the completeness of Robert Jordan’s world; he hasn’t simply come up with one idea and padded it out, but a complex history as well as present. This makes the book seem quite busy, with many different elements we are only seeing glimpses of in this one novel. While this does leave you wanting more (and boy, is there more!), it also means that there is a feeling of a slight lack of wholeness – this is very much one of a series. In fact, in some ways, this to me read more like an introduction than the previous book, Eye of the World. The ending especially left me with this feeling: we are left on the brink of bigger events…

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            21.04.2001 20:49
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            Mat has been touched by the evil from Shadar Logoth and must be saved, Rand has discovered things about himself that he must come to terms with and the Horn of Valere must be found. Jordan paces this novel only slightly slower than the Eye of the World and doesn't suffer for it, gradually weaving more complex designs into the whole series he creates an atmosphere of knowing that what the characters are doing isn't the only thing happening in the world and that things could crop up that they (and you) had no idea of. There are more politics and organisations, personal goals and complex interactions and hence the story is slower and more realistic. A good book but not as good as the previous Eye of the World or the subsequent Dragon Reborn

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          • Product Details

            Second volume in the 'Wheel of Time' series.