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Making Money - Terry Pratchett

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Genre: Sci-Fi & Fantasy / Author: Terry Pratchett / Paperback / 480 pages / Book published by Corgi Books

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      25.07.2010 15:39
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      Still a great book, though

      Moist von Lipwig was, just two books ago, a lying, cheating conman without a soul. Then he died, and was made Postmaster General of the Ankh-Morpork Post Office which was in total shambles.

      With Moist's forward thinking in charge though, things started looking up, and he even managed to beat the morse code-like Clacks at their own game.

      So, with the post office running smoothly and efficiently, Vetinari tries to convince Moist to take over the job of chairman of the Ankh Morpork Bank. But Moist, now content with his new lifestyle, declines.

      It's only when the old chairwoman dies, and leaves a majority of the shares to her dog, and her dog to Moist. He also learns that she's put out a contract on the Assassins' Guild to terminate Moist if anything happens to the dog, or he doesn't do as her last will says.

      Beaten, he accepts. But he finds that things aren't going to go as he hoped. With people no longer trusting banks (and using stamps as currency instead), Moist has a lot of work to do. It's not helping that a lot of people want him dead, and the city might also go into war if something isn't done about the 4,000 golems his fiancee discovered.

      ---

      When I first heard about Making Money I was a bit in two minds. Maybe it was because we had pretty much just finished with a Moist von Lipwig story, or maybe it was because I thought it was going to be exactly like Going Postal but with banks, instead.

      And in a way, it was a bit. The general theme behind it has a very similar tone to that of Going Postal, but the main change is with the main characters - both Moist and Adora, who have since undergone massive character development plots in the first book. Moist is still over the top and showman-like, but his conning days are behind him now, and he accepts that. He likes his new, somewhat peaceful life at the post office, which is now pretty self-sufficient and his wife isn't nearly as cold as she used to be.

      I did enjoy it a lot, though, and sure there were some bits that really made me think of Going Postal but it's the same when I read Watch books or Rincewind novels. With the same characters you tend to get similar story themes. And at the end of the day, the two were really quite different.

      All in all, it's a pretty good story, although I don't remember it leaving me with much of an impact. Nonetheless it's still filled with the same quirky characters and sharp wit Pratchett has led us to expect, and is well worth a read.

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      29.05.2010 16:08
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      A Great book, a must read masterpiece

      This was the first Terry Pratchett book i ever picked up.
      The cover sold me immediately, it didn't matter what it was about.
      I bought it at the train station waiting for my train and almost missed my stop when i got into reading it on the train.

      The book follows the story of Moist Von Lipwig the post master of Ankh morpork who gets roped into running the royal bank and mint, but things soon turn out to be more of a challenge than he first thought.

      The chair man of the bank is a dog and the assassins guild has made it very clear his life depends on the dogs survival and that could be a challenge when the Lavish Family wants to claim what they think its rightfully there's and Moist's mysterious past is worryingly catching up with him (shown in the book going postal, but you don't need to read it first)

      The book is very hard to put down once you get into it and i found myself laughing out loud at some of the things i read in it.

      Just as a side note, Going Postal the book that came before this one, has been made into a series and is being aired on Sky one Sundays 6:00-8:00 starting on 30/05/2010, from the trailers it looks great and a must see for anyone considering buying this book.

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      17.07.2009 21:39
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      Making money has never been so dangerous

      Title - Making Money

      Main Characters

      Moist Von Lipwig - the hero
      Adora Belle Dearheart - the pretty lady
      Mr fusspot - the dog and bank chairman
      Lord Vetinary - the patrician
      The Lavish family - Founding family of the bank

      Plot Outline

      We first met Moist von Lipwig in going postal. In this book the postal service is going very well, and with no challenges, Moist is getting bored. The patrician tries to get him to take over the bank, which Moist refuses to do. Due to Mrs. Lavish, moist eventually agrees to take over the bank, putting the rest of the Lavish family as his enemies.
      Cosmo lavish is a little insane and is trying not only to get the bank back, but also to steal the Patricians identity.
      Hilarity ensues, along with a brilliant plot and some really touching moments

      My Feelings

      As another of the industrial revolution books from the Discworld series, the plot is immaculately planned and Terry Pratchett has made another group of entirely believable characters.
      The humour of this book is on the same level of the 'going postal' novel previously released, and as the characters are the same, there are a few running jokes.
      There are lots of moments where you question the intelligence of the background people (the city dwellers) and loads of points in the book where you think 'how's he going to get away with that?'
      The laughs are full and plentiful.
      There is nothing lacking from this book

      In Summary
      This is another great Discworld novel with twists turns and even a couple of absolute lunatics. Who would have thought money could be so dangerous.

      An Evil.Sam review.

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        05.07.2009 14:02
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        Maybe not a classic Pratchett

        Making Money is the 31st book in Terry Pratchett's Discworld series, based on the fantastical and flat discworld with its varied people and highly developed locations and history.

        Making Money follows the continuing adventures of Moist Von Lipwig who we were first introduced to in Going Postal. At the end of the 29th Pratchett book we left recently hanged, ex-conman Lipwig having successfully saved the Ankh Mopork postal service, reinvigorated a minor goddess and having found Spike the love of his life.

        So it is little wonder that at the start of Going Postal that we find Lipwig feeling a little unchallenged - his fiancee is out of town doing something for the golem trust, and he has taken to breaking into the post office and extreme sneezing to get his kicks.

        So when Vetinari, the ruler of Ankh Morpork, offers him the chance to run the Ankh Mint and the bank next door you'd have thought he'd jump at it - Lipwig doesn't as this is a slightly more extreme challenge than he wants. Unfortunately for Lipwig matters are taken out oh his hands when the bank's owner passes away and leaves him in charge of the bank's chairman. Maybe making money will be fun - as long as he can survive the attentions of the bank's shareholders, build a working relationship with his differently normal chief cashier, stop a long dead professor from stealing his girlfriend and remember to take the chairman for walkies.

        This book has a lot of Discworld's known citizens making cameo appearances throughout it such as Sgt Angua, Commander Vimes, Mr Slant, Ponder Stibbons and the Times journalists. We also meet some new characters the best among them being Gladys the feminist golem - who I'd love to see more of.

        I have got the full series of Discworld books and I automatically bought this one when it came out. I really like the character of Moist von Lipwig and enjoyed his adventures in going postal but felt that making money was a bit of a rehash of that story. Maybe my appreciation of the banking system is a bit limited but I did not notice Pratchett's usual plays on words and digs at the British system throughout this book. There was a secondary storyline running throughout the book regarding Spike's rescue of some ancient golems but I felt this was a bit muddled.

        Having said all that I did enjoy this book and found some areas very funny. The new characters were well developed, even the bank's chairman. The last few chapters of the book although a little rushed tie up the loose ends and definitely leave me wanting another Lipwig adventure...although not following this formula.

        For fans of Terry Pratchett this is a must read; for thos that are new to him I'd suggest starting with another Discworld book first.

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          05.03.2009 20:48
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          a great Pratchett discworld novel .bright intellegent satire with humour in heaps

          Making Money by Terry Pratchett follows the precarious and somewhat surreal life of conman Moist von Lipwig. It is based in Pratchett's ever popular discworld, whose novels are regarded as some of the finest modern satire to date.
          The tale begins in the city of Ankh-Morpork, ruled by the ruthlessly efficient Lord Vetinari. He saves the charismatic Lipwig from death by hanging and offers him a new life rejuvinating the cities postal service. Soon, having completed his task, Lipwig is once again brought infront of Vetinari and finds himself reluctantly moving up to the position of running Ankh Morpork's royal mint and bank. He soon feels traped when realising he is part of a devious master plan of Vetinari's, but maintains his escape plans ready for when the worst happens.
          Things do not go smoothly for the successful and charming conman. After the chairwomen dies she tries to prevent her greedy family from ruining the bank for good and leaves Lipwig in possesion of her little fat dog, Mr Fusspot and in turn inheriting the bank's head position. Lipwig is thrown into a world of stylish death threats, blackmail and wonderfully terrible puns.

          Whilst throwing the bank into a positive revolution by making it more accessible to lower classes and creating the first paper money, Moist Von Lipwig deals with an array of distrations. His golom assistant is developing a sex and a crush, his chief clerk may be a vampire..or worse and a blackmailing part-time lunatic with a vetinari obsession is closing in. He finds himself overcoming challenges he didnt even know existed, in his own creative style.

          The book lays on the humour in heaps yet opens up debates on power, money and politics. What makes Pratchett's novel great is that he is unafraid to satire large corporations and institutions yet he maintains a love and warmth for them. This makes his satire extremley human and is refreshingly funny, outlandish without being disheartening.

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          21.01.2009 10:50
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          A bit beige but I'm sure all Pratchett fans will love it anyway!

          I finished this book on the journey home last night but it has taken me until to write my review because I just could not work out what I thought of it!!

          This book focuses on Moist Von Lipwig, the star of previous Terry Pratchett book Going Postal. In his previous outing our star was saved from hanging by Lord Vettinari and charged with turning around the fortunes of the postal system - which he successfully managed to do. He also saved the Clacks messaging system and met the love of his life, Adora Belle Dearheart.

          As this story opens the previously mentioned Ms Dearheart has gone away on business, the post office is running smoothly with absolutely no problems and Moist, the man used to living on the run experiencing the excitement of scamming a living, is bored, so bored in fact that he has taken to breaking into the Post Office in the dead of night purely to provide some excitement.

          In what appears to be at first glance a random introduction by Lord Vettinari, Von Lipwig then meets Mrs Lavish the eccentric, eldest member of the City's richest family and also owner of the City bank. When Mrs Lavish dies and leaves the running of the bank to Moist he soon discovers just how far the Lavish family are willing to go to get their hands on it!

          On top of that he has to deal with his chief banker having a breakdown as well as thousands of new Golems arriving in the City and causing havoc among the leaders as to who they will 'belong' to, all while trying to turn a failing bank into a successful one!

          It is hard to pinpoint why but this book really disappoints me. While typing this review I have tried, unsuccessfully, many times to put into words how I feel about it but unfortunately all I can come up with is.................beige! In my opinion, Making Money is a very beige book!

          I would recommend this to all Pratchett fans because if you've followed the Discworld series from the beginning then you won't let a neutral review from me put you off but if you are new to the series then I would recommend starting with a different book first.

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            30.04.2008 13:17
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            A good book, with slightly frightenig timing for publication

            Now and then, Terry Pratchett's timing can be uncanny. This book was released only days after the run on Northern Rock in the UK - a coincidence that still leaves me gaping a little at the appropriateness of it all.

            For Making Money is, as the title might suggest, about banks. Moist von Lipwig - star of Going Postal - reappears in this one to be handed the responsibility of the Bank of Ankh Morpork.

            What I love most about Pratchett's newer work is the way he does his research. While the principle of money in this book - the idea of it being in our heads, of us not NEEDING gold - is explained in slightly laughing tones throughout this book, it is nevertheless explained accurately. I particularly liked the mention of the people who are represented in the economic system as "keeping money in an old sock" - again, particularly good timing as the BBC reported less than a week ago tha\t the "keeping money under the mattress" quotient in the UK.

            I can see that this one's had a couple of negative reviews. I don't know - maybe it's because I'm a bit of an economy and political geek, but I LIKED this book. Maybe it's not as silly as the early Pratchett books, swinging closer to satire than outright humour, but I enjoy that in his later works. It still leaves me giggling, but makes me think too.

            Amazon currently have it for £12.53 in hardback, but if you wait for June you can get the paperback for just over £5.

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              14.12.2007 14:02
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              Another top Discworld novel from a national treasure

              I've just heard the news that Terry Pratchett, author of over 30 books in the Discworld series, has been diagnosed with a rare form of Alzheimer's. It got me thinking about some of my other long term authors and how their work as had peaks and troughs - usually descending rapidly in quality in later years. Pratchett has always managed to avoid this as although his books are invariably set in Ankh-Morpork the actual stories tackle different subjects each time. That is until now as his latest book 'Making Money' revisits the cast of 'Going Postal' and reuses similar story plots. Could this work in what may be one of his last books?

              Moist von Lipwig is back in his second starring role in a Pratchett novel as the head of the increasingly successful Post Office. Things have become so successful for the former con man turned man of the people that he no longer fears from his life. With this boring fact in mind he is reluctant to take on the role of bank manager for a struggling chain, especially one were the Chairman is a dog that likes to play with an unusual chew toy. Can Moist modernise the banking sector in the same way he did the post office? Not if the nasty and rich Lavish family have anything to say about.

              Enjoyment of 'Making Money' is almost entirely dependent on two variables - your enjoyment of Pratchett's novels, and you enjoyment of 'Going Postal' in particular. 'Making Money' is typical Pratchett fair in so many ways. It is set in Ankh-Morpork and although Lipwig has only appeared once before the rest of the book is jammed full of characters that we have met many times. This leads to one of the issues with the books that has haunted the Discworld series for years - how do you cater for new readers? There are so many subplots and cameos in this book that will go over the heads of people who have only previously read 1 or 2 Pratchett novels. 'Making Money' is not particularly accessible to first time readers, but to long term fans it is a joy.

              One area in which Pratchett triumphs is his characterisations. 'Making Money' is full of the characters that we have known and loved for years with many getting extended cameos. However, in my opinion it is the relatively unknown characters that are the most fun. Lipwig is a great creation, up there with the best of Pratchett's inventions. He is a restless character that will take risks to get the job done often resulting in amusing outcomes. The bad guys in this novel are also particularly good. The Lavish family are well thought out as they try and oust Lipwig from the bank. Cosmo's slow decline into madness is a great read.

              There are issues with the pacing of this book that I feel Pratchett has always struggled with. The first 100 pages are slightly too slow, then the middle section is fantastic. This central section sees the baddies try and create a plan to unseat Lipwig and the canine Chairman who has taken over the bank. Unfortunately for Pratchett he stumbles into confusing cerebral mode near the end were he tries to add ideas of magic to the story that leaves me cold. The book still works well, but many people will be put off by the concluding section. The problems are nowhere near as bad as those seen in 'Reaper Man' or 'Hogfather', but it does prevent the book from being up their with is best work such as 'Masquerade' or 'Guards, Guards'.

              'Making Money' is certainly a fan service book and not one that should be read by the casual reader. Far too much has gone on over the past 30 books or so for a person just to jump in. Personally I would love to be able to go back a start again with the Witches early books, or even more so the Guards. 'Guards, Guards' is always the book that I advise people to start with as it's a good one and earlier enough to not be confusing.

              With a limited number of books left in the Pratchett led 'Discworld' series 'Making Money' shows that although Pratchett is not on top form he is still a great author. It is witty, intelligent and for the most part very well written. If he can just concentrate on the simple stories that make the books so great and try and iron out the confusing cerebral sections he would he back to his very best. I really enjoyed the character of Lipwig and I hope that he appears again in the future. The 'Discworld' books have given me a lot of joy through my life and I hope that they continue to do so for the foreseeable future.

              Mr Pratchett, I salute you.

              Author: Terry Pratchett
              Price: amazon uk - £10.44
              play.com - £10.99

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                01.11.2007 21:47
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                It'll sell well - you can BANK on that!

                Having spoofed opera, films, publishing, the post office and goodness knows what else, Terry Pratchett turns his sharp sense of humour to the world of banking in the latest Discworld novel. You’d think that was an area ripe for skitting, wouldn’t you? And you’d be right as Pratchett turns in what is, for me, one of his best Discworld novels for some time.

                The basic plot sees Moist Von Lipwig (last seen in Going Postal!) take over the Ankh Morpork Bank. When I saw Lipwig had been brought back, I was slightly concerned, as I never really warmed to him as a character first time round. Whilst Going Postal was OK, it was not one of the best in the series. This time round, however, Pratchett really seems to have got Lipwig nailed and produces a brilliant portrayal of a seemingly superficial and glib character who is fun to read about. Since he features in most of the book, this is just as well.

                This being a Pratchett book, though, there are lots of other characters to share the load: from Adora Belle, Lipwig’s chain-smoking, golem obsessed girlfriend to Mr Bent, Chief Cashier at the Bank. In truth, many of these are superficially drawn and do sometimes seem a little bit too grotesque to be either real or likeable. Surprisingly, though, I didn't find this a problem. As with many Pratchett novels, there’s an awful lot of humour to be mined from the relationship between all the characters and the various misunderstandings (deliberate and otherwise) which emerge.Making Money may be simpler than many previous Discworld novels, but in some ways, this made it more fun.

                Best of all, though, the Patrician, Lord Vetiniari, has one of his biggest starring roles, playing a central part in the plot. Often when formerly shady and mysterious characters are brought out in to the light, it’s disappointing and they prove to be weak and poorly developed. Here, though, Pratchett preserves Vetinari's previous character, whilst making him just a little bit more human.

                Oh, and the Chairman of the Bank is a dog called Mr. Fusspot! You wouldn’t believe how much humour Pratchett can get out of descriptions of a character whose only contribution to dialogue is “woof!”

                Humour-wise, it’s as wide-ranging as you would expect , with sly digs at just about everything. The humour covers all tastes from visual gags to word play to slapstick and hilarious misunderstandings. Where Pratchett often shines though, is in his descriptions. He has a way with words which describes things perfectly whilst at the same time being very funny indeed. Some of his descriptions of the antics of Mr. Fusspot, for example, are hilarious. Read this book in public at your peril. I found myself laughing out loud on several occasions, and attracted some pretty strange looks!

                This is all backed up by a interesting plot which (within the confines of the Discworld!) makes sense and draws the reader in. Often Pratchett plots don’t make a lot of sense and are only there as something to hang the characters or the humour on. Making Money, though, sees them all come together perfectly to create a very funny, very readable book.

                It also has a fantastic, utterly stupid ending. Pratchett deliberately spends the whole book leading you down a blind alley and then pulls a completely unexpected development out of the bag. It should be very silly and pathetic, but Pratchett knows his stuff and somehow manages to pull it off. This is unusual, as I often feel that the endings are the weakest part of Pratchett’s books and that he sometimes has a tendency to go on just 20 or 30 pages too long. Not here, though. The ending is perfect and the book keeps you gripped until the end – in fact, I didn’t want it to finish. When I reached the last page that I couldn’t have more!

                Interestingly, for the first time in his books aimed at the adult market, Pratchett has decided to write in chapters. It’s surprising what a difference this makes to the readability of the text. Rather than being faced with page after page of text with only small breaks between sections, there are proper chapters, making it much easier to sit down and read. It also enhances that “just a bit more” feeling: that feeling where you’re getting tired, but browse ahead and see you’ve only got a few pages to the end of the chapter and so carry on. This was much more difficult with previous Pratchett books.

                There’s only a couple of downsides I can think of, and these are fairly minor ones. Firstly, Pratchett is gradually bringing Discworld closer to the real world. Whilst there’s always been elements of that, they are getting stronger with each novel. Discworld used to have its own distinctive feel and flavour, increasingly, it’s becoming like a slightly strange version of Earth. I enjoyed reading previous novels because they were so different to normal life. Now the two are beginning to intertwine a little too much for my liking.

                Secondly, I wouldn’t advise reading this as your first Discworld novel. Most of his books can be read as standalone stories. This one, however, does very much build on his previous books – particularly Going Postal and Feet of Clay. There is an assumption that, at the least, you will be familiar with most of the basic characters. Whilst a new reader would still get a lot of enjoyment out of the book, you will get much more out of it if you are aware of previous events in the lives of the various characters.

                Likewise, just occasionally, it appears that Pratchett is trying a little too hard to shoehorn characters from his previous books into the storyline. Rather than just concentrate on the main characters, he pulls in people from lots of his other books. It's almost as though he went to a fan convention and took a survey on favourite characters, then made sure they were all included to maximise the book's market potential.

                As I say, though, these are fairly minor criticisms in what is one of the funniest, most readable Discworld books for years.

                Basic Information
                ----------------------
                Making Money
                Terry Pratchett
                Doubleday, 2007-10-19
                ISBN: 978-0385611015

                Available new from Amazon for £9.50

                Incidentally, part of the plot deals with the collapse of a bank... and it was released around the time of the Northern Rock incident. Co-incidence? Or did Pratchett pull off an audacious marketing ploy to make his book more relevant ?

                ;-)

                © Copyright SWSt 2007

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                  08.10.2007 11:41
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                  The worst Discworld novel in a long time.

                  Moist von Lipwig is a lucky man. He has escaped hanging to become a hugely successful Postmaster General, find the girl of his dreams and and launch the new cabbage flavoured stamp. However, Moist gets bored very easily and longs for the excitement and challenges of his old life. Unfortunately, for him he might just get more excitement than he can handle when he finds himself in charge of Ankh Morpork's Royal Mint and bank. When your boss is a dog and you are about to be exposed as a massive fraud life can certainly no longer be accused of being dull. The question is does Moist have what it takes to evade his enemies and finally get the bank making money?

                  "Making Money" is the second outing for Moist von Lipwig and the thirty-first Discworld novel. This should instantly warn you that this is perhaps not the novel to start on if you are a newcomer to the series. Although "Making Money is not inaccessible, Pratchett has an increasing reliance on the reader being one of his huge fan base. As such, many characters pop up who are considered "regulars" with little or no explanation as to who they are and how they got there. Those wishing to start the series may be better served by his earlier novels or even by his previous Discworld novel "Going Postal", in which we first meet our protagonist Moist von Lipwig.

                  So, certainly not a standalone novel, "Making Money" carries on were "Going Postal" left off. How much you enjoyed "Going Postal" is going to impact heavily on how much you enjoy this. You see this is pretty much more of the same. The setting has changed from Post Office to Bank, there are a host of new characters but other than that there is nothing new here. This is were "Making Money" becomes something of a problem to me. I was not particularly enamoured with Moist von Lipwig's character in "Going Postal". We are expected to like him as a loveable rogue, a "Del-boy" style chancer who has conned his way through life. I just do not buy it. Lipwig is supposed a character that oozes style and can "talk the talk" yet he lacks depth and as such I can share no empathy with him. As the novel revolves around Lipwig if you do not like the character, you will really struggle to enjoy the story. I know I did.

                  The cast of supporting characters also lack depth and, apart from a wonderfully eccentric villain, seem to just meander for long periods of the book with no real purpose. There is a lack of fun and humour in "Making Money" the like of which a Pratchett novel has never seen and the plot takes so long to get going that it is really hard to care what happens.

                  Pratchett seems to be getting into a "Discworld by numbers" scenario as he concentrates on his other ventures and "Making Money" seems to be a case of ticking boxes and ensuring popular characters all get cameos without any real purpose. Perhaps, my major issue with this novel is that the city of Ankh Morpork has become all too real. No longer is it a parody of our world but it almost seems to be becoming part of it and for me when a Discworld fantasy novel loses its sense of escapism in favour of realism then it is a sad day.

                  One can only hope that Pratchett will think about writing more novels away from Ankh Morpork as this is were the future of the series lies as illustrated in the wonderful Monstrous Regiment and Tiffany Aching books. Alas, "Making money" only make me feel robbed of the trademark good tale riddled with poignant humour I have come to expect from Pratchett. Not even worth the money at paperback price and only idiotic fans such as myself would still buy this.

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