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Moranthology - Caitlin Moran

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Author: Caitlin Moran / Hardcover / 368 Pages / Book is published 2012-09-13 by Ebury Press

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      20.09.2013 20:18
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      A compilation of some of Caitlin Moran's best work

      I'm a massive fan of Caitlin Moran. I make a special point of reading all her columns in 'The Times', and I love her feisty feminist humour, and the way she applies it to everything from tabloid celebrities to world politics. We also happen to share very similar tastes in film and TV. So of course, I couldn't wait to read her latest book, full of her opinions on major social and political issues, as well as on her favourite actors and TV shows.

      It is quite difficult for me to describe what this book is about, as it is comprised of 78 short opinion pieces, no more than ten pages long, and with some only comprising a page. This makes it very easy to dip into, which is good, because as a student, I don't have much time to read during term. I can't manage most fiction books, as I hate leaving a story and having to come back to it a few weeks later, struggling to remember what has happened. Moranthology, however, gives me something I can easily work my way through, with as many breaks as necessary. I could also probably race through it if I were to read it during the holidays, as it is fairly easy to read. The chapters are on wide-ranging and eclectic topics, but the titles don't give much away. 'I am a dwarf called Scottbaio', for example. I had no idea what to expect from that one.
      What you do get is Caitlin Moran's trademark wit applied to everything from the TV series Sherlock, to why the coalition government is ruining the country, to very serious subjects, such as childhood poverty. Caitlin's talent is that she can tackle the incredibly light subjects without ruining her credibility to tackle the deeply serious ones, and she does both incredibly well. This book made me laugh out loud; her Downton Abbey review entitled 'Lady Mary's Haunted Vagina' was one of my favourites. If this sounds crude, it isn't, it's just an incredibly bizarre, and probably unique take on one of the episodes in series one. This book also made me sob uncontrollably. The chapter 'Time Travel in the Same Four Places' is a brief run through of Caitlin's life, based on one location. This doesn't sound very interesting, but it is one of the most moving pieces I have ever read.

      The one downside to this book; I had read almost everything before. What I didn't realise when I bought it was that it was a compilation of previously written newspapers columns. Yes, there were a few pieces I had missed, but most of it was familiar. For this reason, you have to be an incredibly dedicated fan, or completely new to Caitlin, to get the most out of this book. Those in the middle will probably be bored by stuff they've already read and didn't fall in love with the first time. It didn't dent my enjoyment of the book too much, but it would have been nice to know earlier that I wasn't buying new material.

      Overall, I think this book would be perfect for Caitlin's biggest fans, or as an introduction for those who haven't read her before. Her breadth of skill is astonishing, but I know she can be highly opinionated, and this may annoy a lot of people. I however, utterly loved this book.

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