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Pendragon: The Lost City of Faar - D.J. MacHale

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Genre: Sci-Fi / Fantasy / Author: D.J. MacHale / Paperback / 416 Pages / Book is published 2008-09-01 by Simon & Schuster Children's

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    2 Reviews
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      30.05.2009 10:58
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      enjoy the authors humor

      Lost City of Faar is written by D J Machale. It follows a boy named Bobby Pedragon and his uncle press who a both Travelers. Travelers are people who can travel to alternative worlds. As with all hero stories there is a bad guy named Saint Dain. I still don't know why the author has decided to give him the tittle of Saint. His motives in the story are to be in control every world he has been in as most bad guys do. If that was not bad enough he will try make massive wars in each world. Bobby And Press travel to each world through doorways or as the author calls them in this flumes. Bobby and uncle press are not the only travelers each world or territory as the author calls them has its own Travelers. The lost city of faar is the second book in the pendragon series of ten books. The previous book was called Merchant of death. Uncle Press and Bobby also have another good friend as a traveler a her name
      This book goes into a territory named Clorral.


      The story Begins.

      Clorral as you may have guessed is a world full of water where every city is on a man made island.
      The best way to describe the world of Clorral is from the movie water world starring Kevin Coster except the people are a bit more advanced. The people don't have gills though they wear something called air globes. They work by taking out the oxygen of he water and give the oxygen to the diver so you source of oxygen never runs out. Each city is on a large boat and is either specialized in farming or making boats or anything they need to build. The traveler for Coral is named Vo Spader who is an aquaneer which is our equivalent of the navy. Spader is a really good character who has a very positive outlook on life and he is the life of the party. He uses some very annoying Phrases like
      hobey ho and some other annoying phrases other than that I really enjoy his character. All Clorrans like drinking something called sniggers which is a non alcoholic drink. From the way the author describes Sniggers it sounds similar to that of Red bull except its not an energy drink. Each fume or gate to each Territory is guarded by vicious creatures named quigs. In each territiory quigs are different here they are giant sharks and in another territory named denderon they are giant bears

      The story of Faar is similar to that of Atlantis. The people have have a similar role they are there to help the people of clorral and are an advanced civilization. I won't go anymore detail of faar as it would give to much away of the story.

      Overall

      Really good Story which I enjoyed from chapter one to the end. I really enjoy D J Machale's humor in this series. You need to start from book 1 before you move on too his book as each book is a continuation of the last book.

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      03.12.2008 13:53
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      The potential ripens in this sequel.

      I was seriously hoping that the promise shown by the first novel would be more fully realised in later offerings, and boy did MacHale deliver. In just the second instalment of the series, he manages to deliver such a fully realised reality that looking up from this book was a disappointing return to the real world. Forget the laundry, I wanted to read another chapter!

      Uncle Press is still teaching Bobby what it means to be a Traveller, and how to handle their responsibilities which basically happens to be saving the universe from penultimate evil. Bobby is still trying to wrap his head around his family's existence disappearing from his own Territory as if none of them ever existed, save for the personal memories of those who knew them, when it's time to take another trip to yet another Territory. Another Territory means another face off with the evil Saint Dane, and having to figure out what his dastardly plot is. But no one can know they are form else where and when, so its time to learn the local customs, blend in, and try to sort out things with this Territory's own Traveller. Piece of cake, right? You have to be joking...

      If it all sounds a bit super spy in a sci fi setting, you would be right for, as the publisher itself explains, this is epic fantasy for the Alex Rider generation. Forget fairies and wizards though, this is science fiction with a futuristic water world at the core of the story. Part Atlantean mythos and part pulp sci fi, MacHale breathes a rare realism into this world that makes it as believable as if we saw it with our own eyes. Once again we experience the adventure via both first person journals and third person narration, which is done deftly so that we get both sides of the story weaving together comprehensibly. The teenage angst and deep soul searching are also both realistic for the ages of the protagonists, as well as providing an impetus for the series as the young Travellers develop. The climax was as it should be, quite exciting, though a bit predictable having a Hollywood ending sort of feel, but then these sort of books always do!Overall, it was a great story, well imagined and superbly told.

      An incarnation of this review may also be found over on The Book Bag.

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