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The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets' Nest - Stieg Larsson

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Genre: Crime / Thriller / Author: Stieg Larsson / Edition: Reprint / Paperback / 746 Pages / Book is published 2010-01-23 by Quercus Publishing Plc

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      17.03.2013 15:56
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      It's been a long journey, but a worthwhile one

      Welcome. It's been a long journey if you've made it this far into Stieg Larsson's Millennium Trilogy. Over a thousand pages gone and seven hundred still remaining. So far, the trip has been worthwhile; let's hope the final destination is worth the wait

      Following on directly from the events of the second book, Lisbeth Salander is in hospital after a fateful confrontation with Russian gangster Alexander Zalachenko and faces criminal charges for his attempted murder. Crusading journalist Mikael Blomqvist gathers Salander's few allies together to expose the conspiracy which has been conducted against Salander since her teenage years.

      One of the real strengths of the Millennium Trilogy has been the way that the genre has shifted from book to book. The first was essentially a "locked room" mystery; the second a revenge drama; this final instalment is a cross between political thriller and legal drama. It's this ability to change direction that has helped to keep the series fresh through over 1500 pages of text. All the books share common themes and characters, yet are so varied in terms of the plotlines. In this way, Larsson avoids the issue which affects all too many trilogies - that familiarity breeds contempt, with books becoming weaker as the series progresses.

      The thing that will strike you most about Hornets' Nest is the length. Even by the standards over the other two books, this is long. Weighing in at over 700 pages, it's the longest of the trilogy by quite some distance. This increased size comes at a price, which is that Hornets' Nest requires a little more investment of time to get into and, initially at least, seemed a lot less interesting. Indeed, there were times during the opening 150 pages or so when I began to wonder whether I had the stamina to make my way through yet another Larsson epic.

      Much of the reason for this lies in that shift in subject matter. The two previous Girl books have mostly been location independent. They might have been set in Sweden, but that was merely a backdrop for the action because the author happened to be Swedish. They could actually have taken place anywhere and you didn't need to know anything about Sweden as a country or society to understand it.

      Hornet's Nest is different. The action shifts to the political arena and dovetails in with recent Swedish history - a subject I wouldn't imagine too many UK readers are familiar with. Recognising this, Larsson needs to spend a lot of the early pages filling in the blanks in the readers' knowledge, explaining the Swedish political system and providing background information to some major events in the country's history. This is essential to what comes later, but it inevitably slows the pace of the book down somewhat.

      Once you do get into it, though, initial misgivings are soon forgotten as Hornets' Nest turns out to be just as intriguing and compelling as the two previous titles. As he has clearly shown in the earlier books, Larsson can weave a brilliantly complex tale that frequently keeps the reader guessing; but does so in a way which is both clear and readable. Once you've got over that initial hump, Hornets' Nest is one of those books which it's very difficult to put down. The action flows incredibly smoothly with plenty of plot developments and intrigue to pique your interest, the characters prove as fascinating as ever and knowing this is the final book in the series drives you on to find out what happens.

      And, in a way, that's why the ending is rather disappointing. After the stunning imagination shown throughout the trilogy, it felt a little trite and predictable; rather too neat and convenient. Part of the appeal of Lisbeth Salander as an anti-hero has been the fact that she has always been an outsider, a woman shrouded in mystery and standing apart from the norms of society. The ending to Hornets' Nest undermines some of that, and I can't help but feel that Larsson should have ended the book sooner, leaving things more open-ended.

      Finally, of course, you do have to have read the two earlier books for this to make any sense. Larsson (reasonably enough) assumes this and so doesn't waste time recapping previous events. He assumes that readers will already be familiar with Blomqvist's and Salander's recent past. It's also good to see that he treats the reader with respect and assumes that they are capable of remembering what has already happened, rather than feeling the need to spoon-feed them little recaps every now and then. Having said that, the events of books two and three in particular are so tied together that you will probably need to read them fairly close together to get the most out of them.

      Larsson's untimely death was undoubtedly a tragedy since he never got to witness the success his books deserved and we got just three books from him. Of course, you just know that somewhere down the line some smart-alec publisher is going to try and cash in on the success by getting someone else to take over the franchise, but I won't be reading when that happens. As far as I'm concerned, there's only one Lisbeth Salander; and there's only one man capable of writing about her.

      Basic Information
      -------------------------
      The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets' Nest
      Stieg Larsson
      Quercus, 2009
      ISBN: 978-1-84916-274-6

      © Copyright SWSt 2013

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      15.03.2012 17:49
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      Would recommend the book - absolutely amazing!

      If you're reading this review I would imagine you have already read the other two books in the series. If you have enjoyed these and are wondering whether to read this one, you have to go for it!
      I would say if you haven't read the first 2 installments, then I would advise to read, or at least see the films for those first. Whilst the author does make some attempt to recap the reader on previous events, this is minimal and I think it might be a struggle to follow the narrative without fully understanding what has already taken place.

      I absolutely loved the first book and was possibly a little let down by the second, but fear not - the legend that is Stieg Larsson bites back with this 3rd installment leaving the reader unable to put the book down. Lisbeth Salander is possibly the coolest vigilante of the 21st century!
      Whereas I found the first book to be a fairly self contained story of it's own, the second and third seem to be very much a part of one another.

      The book is almost 600 words long and I felt almost reluctant to read large chunks of it, as I was enjoying it so much I didn't want it to end!

      Overall an amazing ending to the trilogy which will thrill and excite all the way from start to finish. The only great shame is that the wonderful author is no longer around to provide us with a further installment to the series.


      *In response to the comments*
      1. I have chosen not to include spoiler information about the book in my review, as personally I would not like to read a review that contained this information.
      2. I don't see why it's 'odd' to assume that people reading this book would have read others in the series. It's the third installment, logically you would read 1&2 first.
      3. If you read the review properly you will see that at no point did I state that 600 words was long. I said that book was 600 words long, as in it contains 600 words. This wasn't a criticism.

      Ultimately if I was trying to decide whether or not to read a book, I just want to know whether it's worth reading or not and not a detailed description of the contents of the book. I'll find that out when I read it!

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        05.03.2011 20:30
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        Amazing!!

        ** WARNING! - DO NOT READ IF YOU HAVE NOT READ THE GIRL WHO PLAYED WITH FIRE! **
        This is due to the fact that I cannot review this book without spoiling the second.


        The Girl Who kicked the Hornet's Nest is the third and final instalment of Larsson's Millennium Trilogy. Although, apparently, Larsson did plan to write 10 Millennium novels and started on a fourth!

        This story follows on from The Girl Who Played With Fire. Lisbeth is in hospital after taking a shot to the head, with Zalachenko just a few doors down on the same ward after her attack. When Zala presses charges, Lisbeth is charged with GBH and attempted murder. Aswell as being confined to bed rest, she is now being closely watched. The only person who can help her now? Michael Blomkvist.


        At first, I found it difficult to concentrate on this book as there was quite a lot of politics to start with which I found very difficult to absorb. I had to read some parts twice which held me back from moving on and finding answers!!
        Once I'd managed to concentrate and really get into it, I found it so difficult to put the book down and had to force myself to go to sleep. Even then I dreamt about what might happen next!!

        Throughout the novel, I found it very difficult to work out how Blomkvist was going to help Lisbeth to get out of this situation, especially when it becomes clear that some seriously power forces are against her. It's like a race between these people and Blomkvist to cover up/reveal the truth and I found myself worrying that he wouldn't be able to do enough to help her!

        Another aspect of the book that I really enjoyed was the fact that Lisbeth's past was finally explained in full and you finally understand why she has a guardian etc. I was worried that this would be told in a very sensitive way but it was still as brutal as the first book, which is what gripped me from the start!

        As you get closer to the end, you know what you want to happen but you never know if it will or if Larsson is going to shock you at the last minute! No spoilers here! If you want to know then read it and find out!!!

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        29.09.2010 19:25
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        Highly recommend this to anyone

        This book follows on from the second seamlessly, picking up the threads of story quickly and maintaining the fast pace Larsson demonstrated in The Girl who Played with Fire. I would argue that this book is in fact the most enjoyable of the three - which is quite remarkable for a trilogy.

        At the beginning of this book you wonder what can have possibly filled over 700 pages after the conclusions that arose from the second, however Larsson delivers a number of twists and turns that not only develop the original storylines from the second, but introduces a fuller and more complex picture than originally illustrated to the reader.

        It is quite challenging to write this review without revealing any important parts of the story, so I will conclude with my own personal opinions of this book.

        It is extremely well written, parts are in painstaking detail, that although often runs to great length never really bothers the reader because nothing is written that does not add in some way to the story. The story in itself is fantastically conceived, and delivered brilliantly with plenty of twists and turns, and this last book maintains a fast pace throughout.

        If anyone wants to know any more specific information please ask me.

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          28.08.2010 18:41
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          Well worth reading despite some minor flaws. Good end to the Trilogy!

          This is the last book in the Millenium Trilogy, by Swedish author Stieg Larson.

          This series follows a Swedish political and financial journalist (Mikael Blomkvist) investigating the not so clear political and industrial milieu of modern day Sweden with the intriguing Lisbeth Salander. Lisbeth is an androgynous young woman, a computer genious and semi-professional hacker, who, while helping Mikael in his investigations, is fighting her own demons and for her own survival in a system which failed her at every stage. However, the pair are no one-dimensional saints: both of them are complex, with their own share of selfishness and questionable moral choices, both in turn manipulative and manipulated (they are a journalist and a hacker after all). Nevertheless, the reader does get very attached to them, and happily goes along in their ultimate quest for justice (even though the term does have complex meanings for both characters).

          Trying to outline the subject of this book without spoiling any element of it for the reader is no easy task, so will try to be concise: Lisbeth, after the battle to the death (or nearly) with her father and brother of the previous book, is in hospital, miraculously alive, and recovering. But instead of being treated as a victim, she is suspected of murder! Unable to leave her hospital bed (but able to hack any computer from there), she will have to let her friend Mikael help her and reveal the huge conspiracy behind the tragic story of her life. Mikael, on the other hand, is trying to balance the need to help her (sometimes at the risk of his life) and the running of his journal Millenium. All of which will need to be solved very fast, as Lisbeth is still in danger!

          The final volume of the trilogy is in keeping with the style of the second volume of the series, more than with the first one. It works on a much faster pace of action and is focused on one of the main characters (Lisbeth) rather than on an external crime to be solved (as in the first one). Similarly, narratively, this third book is very closely following the second installement of the trilogy. The revelations about Lisbeth's tragic childhood and her attempts at pay back in the second volume of Millenium are resolved and further explained in this one. While one could read the second book without having read the first, the reader will not be able to understand the intrigue of this one without the information given in the second one.

          This installement is therefore the climax of the series and it does not disappoint. The rythm is faster and the suspense breathtaking! You will not want to put this book down before the very end! The scope of the narative is also much bigger than the first one: it is no longer limited to Lisbeth's immediate tormentors, but it expands to a much bigger conspiracy!

          Concerning the characters, I appreciated the fact that the character of Lisbeth Salander, which got more and more important and central throughout the series, did not lose any of its ambiguity and anti-heroin qualities in the process: she is on the social margins of society, still stubbornly independant, but loyal to her friends and deserving of the pay back she seeks against those who tormented her.

          One of the negative points of this book was the translation. I have read the French and English version of this book and I have to say that the English version (while being better than the two previous volumes of Millenium) is still below standard in many places... In some places the grammar is shaky and it does not always translate the journalistic style of writing. However, the plot and gripping drama nearly make up for it!

          Overall, this is a fast pace book, the climax and closing volume of the best Nordic Thriller around. For once, the last of a trilogy does not disappoint! We are just left hungry for more, even though the author, Stieg Larson prematurely died before this series was even published.

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            07.06.2010 12:43
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            Shame there will be no more

            After much deliberation, I finally got round to reading the concluding part in Stieg Larsson's Millenium Trilogy, "The Girl Who Kicked The Hornets Nest". The reason for my hesitence in reading the final book? Simply that I adored the first book (The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo) and as a consequence, was more than a little disappointed with the second book (The Girl Who Played with Fire). This third book is a whopping 600 pages long and I wasn't sure I wanted to commit my precious reading time to another disappointment. Luckily for me I wasn't wasting my time - the master storyteller was back!

            For those unaware of the Stieg Larsson/Millenium phenomenom, I will quickly summarise. The first book introduces us to two main characters, Mikael Blomkvist journalist and publisher of "Millennium" Magazine and Lisbeth Salander, a brilliant but slightly odd computer hacker. This unlikely duo team are almost like superheroes (haha) coming together to solve crime and fight injustice; Blomkvist with his honed instinct for a good story and Salander, steely, fearless and able to get almost anything with her world class hacking skills.

            I have to admit, I inwardly groaned when I realized this was taking off from the last book purely because I just didn't find the 2nd book that interesting. I have already mentioned in my reviews of the previous two books, but Larsson's writing style is both satisfying and highly irritating all at once - he tends to build up the story slowly and I wouldnt be surprised if most people actually gave up within the first cople of chapters. Once again, it is a case of battling the often confusing and ridiculous amount of Swedish names along with a very slow plot line. It is always worth sticking with, as after dwelling over certain aspects at the beginning of the story, it then shoots off at an enjoyable speed!
            SPOILER ALERT!!!! This is the kind of book that would be impossible to write a review on without giving away part of the last book - naturally there will be spoilers as it leads directly on, so before I get complaints (like I did with the twilight series...again what did you expect?!) please do not read!

            "Her name is Lisbeth Salander. Sweden has got to know her through police reports and press releases and the headlines in the evening papers. She is twenty-seven years old and one metre fifty centimeters tall. She has been called a psychopath, a murderer, and a lesbian Satanist. There has been almost no limit to the fantasies that have been circulated about her. In this issue, Millennium will tell the story of how government officials conspired against Salander in order to protect a pathological murderer..."

            We pick up the story when Salander has been shot in the head and is in a critical condition after tracking down her psychopathic Russian defector father, Zalachenko. Zalachenko, it appears, is more important to some Swedish authorities than a teenage girl, as from the last book, we learn that Salander has been a victim of several grave miscarriages of justice under the name of national security. "The Girl Who Played with Fire" touched on these subjects, and delved into what Salander experienced as a teenager, and this book delves into the effect of her being incarcerated at such a young age. This book is about finding justice over what happened to her - and preventing her being condemed (wrongly) to spend more time in a psychiatric ward in the present day. Although hard, violent and odd; Salander is by no means insane; and this story explains the reason behind why she is so distrusting of all authorities - and most humans come to that.

            So, our heroine is lying in an intensive care ward and Blomkvist is still fighting her corner and trying to find a way to expose those in power who chose to protect Zalachenko instead of a young 13 year old girl. Queue the long list of Swedish names. Infuriatingly, I spent so much time on these first couple of chapters trying to get a grasp on who was who and trying to follow a plot that thickened and thickened with every passing page. I feel like Im repeating myself, but I distinctly remember writing a very similar thing in my "The Girl who played with fire" review and I also said that I remember the first book being like this. In fact, like the first two books, the first quarter of the book shouldn't be dwelt on too much as it really didnt impact too much on my understanding of the story overall. The various names (the ones that are important) do eventually sink in and Larsson is very clever at eventually getting the reader to understand the more complex issues in the story.

            This story essentially explores the theme of corruption in the Swedish Secret Service. As usual, all the main characters are under intense scrutiny by the Swedish media and are being hunted by the villians themselves which lends a sense of urgency to the story which is infectious. Blomkvist and Salander however are their usual courageous selves; Blomkvist determined to see justice prevail, and Salander determined to get her revenge on her father and anyone else that protected him all those years ago. This combined makes "The Girl Who kicked the Hornets Nest" a truly gripping read. Once the story is in full flow, it really does become a very satisfactory read; the story moves quickly, its interesting and well thought out and the characters are just as inegmatic as the first two books. This is a fairly hefty book, but yet I managed to read it - due in part to the gorgeous sunshine I'll admit - in a weekend, I literally couldn't get enough.

            One theme that I found really interesting in this book was the role in which women played throughout the book. It is clear from the strong female characters in the book that Larsson was making a statement about women in power and that during his life, he held them in high regard; people not to be underestimated. (well, I like to think so anyway!) As well as Salander, we see the strong and intelligent personalities of Gianni - Blomkvists sister and lawyer to Salander, Erika Berger, Blomkvists occassional lover and friend and a new love interest who can also stand her own ground.

            There are very few negatives to this book in my opinion but a couple do spring to mind when I think back on it. Firstly, Salander and Blomkvist have very little interaction together throughout the book. The disappointment of the second book could be attributed to exactly this; the first book was such a good read because the duo worked so well together and the second book focussed more on them seperately just like this one. If anything could've been improved upon in this conclusion then it would be that Blomkvist and Salander were reunited in their fight rather than split apart.

            Secondly but less importantly, is the author, Stieg Larssons projection of himself on to Blomkvist. It is clear throughout the books that Blomkvist is modelled on Larsson; Larsson was editor-in-chief of an anti racist magazine and uses his background and knowledge throughout to lift Blomkvists profile. However, I often found Blomkvists "sex appeal" in all the books a little hard to swallow. Almost all of the women featured in this book - despite their obvious intelligence - fall for Blomkvist and end up in bed with him. Although this doesn't ruin the story, I do feel that Larsson was in a way living out his own fantasy - after all - from book one Blomkvist and Erika Berger are sleeping together with the full knowledge and consent of Erika's husband. Blomkvist gets to have all the fun and none of the commitment! Of couse, he would be the only person on earth who would break the heart of Lisbeth Salander too...
            Thirdly, the story overall could have done with some serious editing. Larsson's knowledge of various Swedish agencies, although impressive, are too confusing. Nothing would have been lost - only the readers bafflement at some stages - by cutting out a lot of agencies and officials that he introduces into the story that made it confusing and at times boring.

            My overall thoughts on this as a conclusion to the trilogy: superb. Although Salander, the main character In the story, takes a back seat for most of this it doesn't spoil the enjoyment. She is still a force to be reckoned with, and despite being confined to a bed, a prison and then a court room she is still a character that draws you in with her unusual personality! There are some strong themes running through this book and Larsson is the master at weaving an incredibly interesting, moral and complex tale. Once again I cant help thinking that Stieg Larsson would have made some incredible follow ups to this series of books as this was what he originally planned before his untimely death in 2004. Despite its premature end, it does conclude satisfactorily and still remains my favourite series of books to date.

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              24.05.2010 21:26
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              great page turner and a must read series

              Firstly I loved the first two books, and could not wait to get my hands on the last in the series. As an introduction without spoiling the plot, a misunderstood young woman with various talents is under arrest for murder, a group of associates and friends believe she is not guilty and carry out an investigation to resolve the issues. The story follows this and you have to read it to discover what happens.

              Main Characters
              Lisbeth Salander - young woman mentioned above
              Mikael Blomkvist - investigative journalist, player, generally good guy
              Erika Berger - editor of Millenium magazine, sometime girlfiend to Blomkvist

              All of the old characters are there however it does introduce a lot of new names as part of the conspiracy theory and ongoing investigation. I did find I quite difficult at times to keep up with the new characters and remember who did what and what their part in the plot was. I don't know if it was because I was unsure of how to pronounce names, if I read it too fast and so it didn't sink in or if other people have had the same problem. I had to keep going back to other parts of the book or take a break and think about who was who.

              The much loved characters from the previous books were the same however there personalities were explored a bit more and it just did not concentrate of Blomkvist as it had in the other books.. We found out a bit more about Berger which was great, I liked her from the previous books but she had a much better personality in this. She came forward as a strong, dynamic woman who faces up to challenges and is not just a player. A bit more of her background was explored and also her weaknesses
              Blomkvist is a total player, obviously a talented guy who is a great friend, however why do so many women in this trilogy find this guy attractive? A challenge? I don't think so, too many strong, powerful, intelligent woman fall for this guy it is a bit too easy and I do think a bit of a weakness in this book.

              The story itself is fast moving, well written, and although it isn't that hard to guess the ending it is a real page turner as I could not wait to get to the climax of the story. However was despondent when I did as I did not want this book to end.

              Love this trilogy however gutted that no more books now.

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                13.05.2010 15:44
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                Essential read if you read the first two, just don't expect too much.

                'The Girl who Kicked the Hornets' Nest' is the concluding part of Stieg Larsson's Millennium trilogy. I was eagerly anticipating reading this novel. The two preceding books had established a whole host of characters and had multiple ongoing story threads so it was always going to be interesting to see where Larsson would take the overall story.

                As an initial warning, there genuinely is no point reading this book if you haven't read the other two. This is a proper trilogy where each book picks up the story from the point the previous book left it. There is little in the way of a standalone story. The book is clearly marked as 'Millennium III' so hopefully no-one will fall into the trap of reading this one first.

                The titular character is Lisbeth Salander, a computer hacker who has had a difficult past, in both her family life and dealing with the authorities. She works primarily in the protection and information business. Without wanting to reveal too much from the plot of the first two books, this book focuses on the progression of her family's story above all others, but doesn't involve her personally anywhere as much as I would have liked.

                Salander's back story is mainly established in the second book but there are a number of revelations in this book which show how much Larsson had planned this trilogy out. As usual the staff of the investigative magazine 'Millennium' are involved throughout. Having built up a love/hate relationship with Salander, investigative journalist Mikael Blomkvist continues to try and help/interfere in her life. Although this time his involvement is more appreciated that normal. These two characters form the main parts of the story, however, if you have read the first two books you will see a number of familiar characters appearing. Due to circumstances detailed in the second book there are reasons why Salander cannot be heavily involved in things at the beginning of this book. However, I felt it took far too long to get her involved in this story. She is the character who makes the trilogy tick and this story suffers from her lack of personal involvement. In addition Blomqvist becomes a little tiresome in this book. Once again, every woman he meets throws themselves at him, often to the bemusement of both parties. I think he has now slept with every major female character he has met across the three books. Whilst it can add to the story in terms of how the various women interact with each other it has become ridiculous. Even Ian Fleming allowed Bond to be spurned on occasion. Larsson appears to be living his own fantasy life through one of his principal characters.

                The first book in the trilogy was very enjoyable but largely served as a scene setter which showed how all the relationships were established. The second book was excellent and advanced all story lines, both in forward progression and in filling in back stories. I hoped the third book would continue in this vein but sadly it never really gets going. Where I had looked to make time to read the first two I only really read the third when I had little opportunity to do much else. I just couldn't get into it in the same way. The book is huge at 743 pages and it is an effort to get through it, especially the first 500 pages which feel like they could easily have been edited down to half that amount without losing much. To be fair there are some justifiable reasons for this (again, don't want to spoil anything) but it felt like things didn't move forward for far too long and when they did it seemed like the main event (a court case) was over far too quickly. Things did pick up from the start of the court case onwards but it felt like a filler novel more than a highlight in the series. Larsson seemingly intended to write at least 10 books in the Millennium series before his premature death so it is perhaps unfair to view this as a closed trilogy. So whilst I was disappointed with the story progression I have to remember that there was a bigger picture which may have necessitated a lot of the slow development in this book. Sadly, we will never find out.

                There are a few twists in the book, some were half-expected but others were a major surprise. Larsson does make a brave decision early on in this book with the death of a character I assumed he had big plans for in all of his future novels. To offset the benefits of the twists there are aspects of the book which are not that easy to follow. The structure of the Swedish intelligence service is covered in a fair amount of detail and it can be difficult to keep track of this. Also there are a large number of characters introduced at various organisations and it is almost impossible to remember who is who.

                Surprisingly the end of the book does tie up a lot of the questions which arose from the first two novels. So I would not be put off starting the series if you are worried that things will finish unresolved. Whilst there are aspects that are clearly designed to be developed at a later point; that's all they are, starting points for future developments. For example you discover that Lisbeth Salander has a sister in this novel. She does not play any part at all in this story but you feel that she was obviously introduced so that she can play a part in the future storyline. This was probably the most interesting aspect of what was new. The Salander family's backstory has been the integral part of the three books and it appears that Larsson has plenty more to reveal. The only negative to things finishing as resolved as they did was that the final 100 pages seems a little rushed and almost contrived. The final confrontation between Salander and an old nemesis springs up from nowhere and seems to be included only to tie up all loose ends. As a result the ending is far from satisfying.

                Obviously having read and enjoyed the first two novels this book will be an essential read to anyone who has started the trilogy. It will sell in massive quantities off the back of the other two books but it is real shame it fails to live up to the standard the other two set.

                ISBN 978-1-84916-274-6
                www.girlwhoplayedwithfire.co.uk
                www.stieglarsson.com
                743 pages
                £3.96 on Amazon (paperback)

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                  22.04.2010 07:46
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                  The third and last book of Stieg Larsson.

                  The Girl who played with Fire

                  The third and last book of Stieg Larsson.

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                  The writer: Stieg Larsson
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                  Stieg Larsson real name is Karl Stig-Erland Larsson and was born on the 15th of august 1954. Unfortunately he past away on the age of 50 years. During this life he wasn't really known as a writer and just wrote as a hobby. His normal job was working for a Swedish magazine and wrote books in his free time. Before he died he managed to hand over his three books to a publisher, but died before they actually got published. He wrote the books in a series called Millennium. His first book and published in 2005 and the other soon followed.

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                  The story : The Girl who played with fire
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                  The story is the third and also last part in the Millennium series. The books are about Mikael Blomkvist and Libeth Salander. Mikeal is a publisher and journalist of the magazine called Millennium and Lisbeth is an intelligent hacker who can also break into every computer she wants too. Only in the last book Lisbeth got into trouble and is a suspect of three murders. Suddenly her whole life is in the newspapers and they aren't really positive about her. They call her crazy, a lesbian sex maniac and somebody who should be locked up in a mental institution due social problems. The whole of Sweden thinks she quilty and she has some power people against her. Also in book two she merely survives a too the dead fight with her father, which hospitalised both of them. Suddenly they are only two rooms from each other with both one goal to kill each other, only their health standing in the way. Luckily she got some friends who will help it, but it sure won't be easy!

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                  My opinion
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                  Unfortunately it's the last book that Stieg Larsson has written and since he passed away, we won't see any more books of him. Although it's rumoured that his partner has a fourth book on her computer, but she still hasn't confirmed this. Until then we got these wonderful three books that are all already made into movies and his book are still a massive success. For example his first book has been in the top 100 best selling books on Amazon for 531 days. This third book gets you from the moment and I would really recommend to first read the two other books, otherwise you won' understand the story and the characters. Since I have read the two books, it's like coming home and you are already familiar with the characters and get right into the story. Even the book is more than 500 pages long, there's quite a lot happening and you really need to focus. It's a easy book to read though due the style of writing, which makes it easy to follow the story but like I said there's a lot going on. Mikeal and other friends are trying to prove that Lisbeth is innocent and are trying to get the powerful men who did Lisbeth wrong during her whole life. Lisbeth isn't one to do nothing and of course she's also planning to get back on them, but also have deal with trusting other people. There's certainly lot's going on with the character Lisbeth and her social problems with dealing with other people. She's very smart in math and with computer, but when it comes to people she doesn't know how to act around them. Mikeal is a total different story and is trying to do everything in his power to prove Lisbeth is innocent. Even Lisbeth hasn't spoken to him in the last year, he still believes in her. Although it's more than 500 pages long, I never got bored and got annoyed when my eyes were starting to close due tiredness late at night. It's definitely a book to read!

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                    12.01.2010 18:34
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                    If you have read the other 2 you will want to read it to get closure!

                    This is the third book in stig laarsons trilogy and I made sure it was on the top of my christmas list. You need to have read the first 2 books ( no mean feat as they are 500 pages each!) to even have a clue as to what is going on.

                    Again the book follows Lisebeth Salander as the main character. I have to say that I enjoyed this book because it provided answers and tied up lose ends but I didn't think it was as good as the first 2. The references to sweedish towns and organisational structures (fictional or otherwise) made is difficult to follow the plot in some cases. The relationships between the main characters Lisbeth, Michael and Erika weren't as well developed in this and for this reason the book felt a bit rushed. There is a nice relationship between Lisebeth Salander and her Doctor but this only plays a small part in the book.

                    Maybe its because I had such high hopes but I did find the book dissapointing - but then if you have read the other two you can't not read this one - you will make your own mind up.

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                    10.01.2010 17:51
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                    A must-read for all Larsson fans - but make sure you've read the second!

                    This is the third installment in Stieg Larsson's widely acclaimed Millennium trilogy.

                    **NB possible spoilers for anyone who hasn't read the first two in the series - listed below**

                    The most important thing to know about this book is that it is basically the second half of a whole which The Girl Who Played with Fire kicked off - so it's really important to have read that one first! The action kicks off seconds after the end of the second book, with Lisbeth Salander in a critical condition, Blomkvist hot on the heels of her attacker, and Lisbeth's murderous father in the same hospital - determined to exact revenge upon his daughter. I don't want to give away the plot, but the story follows Blomkvist, Lisbeth and Erika Berger (a primary character in all three books) as they fight for justice on various counts.

                    This third novel successfully draws the trilogy to its conclusion (although the idea that Larsson had part-written a fourth before his untimely death is tantalising, to say the least!) and there is a particularly satisfying courtroom scene, where Lisbeth's tormentors are finally given their dues.

                    I have mentioned in my review of the first and second books that occasionally the narrative can feel a little clunky and verging on trite - and I continue to think that this is a result of a less than excellent translation rather than the actual quality of Larsson's writing - so it's well worth trying to see past some of those minor irritations.

                    Once again, I thoroughly enjoyed the main characters who are interesting, extravagant and flawed - really well drawn and with great chemistry between them all. Larsson really knew how to write a great thriller and this is a fitting end to a fantastic trilogy.

                    The Millennium trilogy comprises the following three titles:

                    1. The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo
                    2. The Girl Who Played with Fire
                    3. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest

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                    06.01.2010 23:39
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                    An excellent dissection of Swedish law and accountability

                    The third in the Millennium trilogy, written by Swedish author Stieg Larsson, 'The Girl Who Kicked The Hornet's Nest' follows on from when the second book leaves the story.

                    Salandar, recovered and placed within a secure hospital bed is arrested for her actions though protected from interogation due to her fragile state. Blomkvist continues to attempt to help her, despite her wanting nothing to do with him, and despite the fact that he is being trailed.

                    The Swedish police and secret service know within this book that they are in a great deal of trouble and potential for being exposed, thus a cat and mouse game begins.

                    As with the previous books, Blomkvist knows more than he lets on and narrowly escapes various incidents due to insiders knowledge, whilst Stieg Larsson drip feeds this information to the reader. Naturally, the story ends happily - though not with a Hollywood kind of shiny glow - but a Stieg Larsson gritty drama to it.

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