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The Lost Symbol - Dan Brown

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Genre: Crime / Thriller / Author: Dan Brown / Hardcover / 448 Pages / Book is published 2009-09-15 by Transworld Publisher

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    58 Reviews
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      07.09.2011 16:01

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      The lost symbol is the much awaited novel from the New york times best-seller Dan Brown. He managed to keep up with the expectations with the the come back of Dr. Langdon(Character from Da Vinci code and Angels & Demons) It was a typical Dan Brown thriller which you cannot put off before finishing it. this book got lots of turns and shocking discoveries which will always keep you interested. You should read it if you haven't allready.

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      23.06.2011 11:10
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      I will stick with the films after reading this!

      Dan Brown - The Lost Symbol Having watched The Davinci Code and Angels and Demons on DVD, my friend leant me 'The Lost Symbol' which apparently is the third instalment of this series by Brown. I wasn't sure about starting to read part way in to the series as, although I had seen the films of the other two, we all know films change a lot! I decided, though, to go ahead and give it a go. Robert Langdon is a Harvard symbologist who arrives at Washington to give a lecture, though within minutes of his arrival a shocking object is discovered and his mentor and prominent mason and philanthropist, Peter Solomon, is kidnapped. Langdon realises that his only hope of saving his friends life is to accept a mysterious summons and solve the mystery surrounding everything. Of course, the CIA are once again suspicious of Langdon which make his job ten times harder! As Langdon teams up with Katherine, Solomon's sister, they find themselves attempting to outwit the CIA in order to race against time to save their friend and brothers life! The story is once again a very simple story and perhaps sounds like similar stories of this kind, though what I like about this story and the whole series is the fact that it is very highly researched and brings in a lot of history, both in reality and mythological. Unlike the Davinci Code film, though, I found that the story was too simple for me to actually get pulled in. The plot was haphazard and at time, difficult to follow - or more so; uninviting! There were a number of good parts, though I do use the term 'good' on purpose as in my opinion, there was nothing spectacular or really new. Apart from Langdon, I did not feel anything for the characters as they seemed to be lacking in background or intensity. Perhaps if the characters had been better, then it may have helped the whole story out! Although there are a lot of negatives in the story, I would not say that I hated it. It certainly had its moments, and the historical value was once again well thought out and entertaining to a degree, though it is not a book I will be rushing to read again any time soon. If you are a fan of Dan Brown and know his work well, then you may have more luck in liking this book that I did. Unfortunately, after reading this book, I think I will stick with the films. RRP: £7.99 Pages: 670

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      19.05.2011 09:23
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      Brown does what Brown does again, only the names have changed

      Why, oh why do I keep doing this to myself? I know Dan Brown isn't a great writer from bitter experience of reading his "Da Vinci Code" Admittedly, "Angels and Demons" was a little better, but not good enough to turn me into a fan. Yet when the opportunity to borrow "The Lost Symbol" arose, fool that I am, I took it. Part of this was that the basis for the story was freemasonry, something I was curious about as my father is a member of that organisation. In "The Lost Symbol", Robert Langdon has been called to Washington to give a lecture as a favour to a friend, Peter Solomon. He soon discovers he's been duped when Solomon's severed right hand appears in the Capitol Building. This is swiftly followed by Director Inoue Sato of the CIA, someone who seems to know more about Langdon's arrival in Washington than he does. There is also a demand from Peter's kidnapper, Mal'Akh, for Langdon to help solve a mystery in return for Solomon's life. The CIA are immediately suspicious of Langdon's appearance, especially as Sato feels Langdon isn't telling her everything he knows. Langdon teams up with Solomon's sister Katherine, whose work in Noetic science is also being targeted by this Mal'Akh. Their main concern is to solve the mystery to save Solomon's life, but the CIA have other plans. They are interested only in protecting the secret Mal'Akh is after, regardless of what happens to Solomon. So Langdon and Katherine are trying to outwit and beat the CIA as well as solving the mystery racing against Mal'Akh's deadline. If much of the above sounds familiar, it probably means you've read Dan Brown's work before. In writing a story that involves solving a mystery against the clock to save life, whilst being chased by someone else and working together with a woman who is somehow involved, Brown has essentially given us "Da Vinci Code 3" here. Indeed, about the only things that distinguish this from that earlier novel are the setting and the basis for the mystery. In all other aspects it is pretty much the same basic plot rehashed again. At least Brown is smart enough to know to play to his strengths and go with what worked so well the first time around. Unfortunately, this means that Brown also continues to play on his weaknesses and it is these which make "The Lost Symbol" a poor novel. As with Brown's other novels, there is a weakness in the characters that prevented me from getting properly involved in the story. The characters are all very two dimensional, on both sides of the plot, which meant I never really cared what happened. Late on, when there was a revelation about one of the characters, I found myself unable to care what had happened and that whole part, which should have been an important turning point, completely passed me by in terms of its potential importance to the plot. That plot itself is a little all over the place as well. The whole sub-plot with Katherine's Noetic science escapades seems to be slightly tacked on and feels a lot like filler at many points, serving only as an excuse for the book's one huge explosion which may be only a nod to the potential film adaptation, but did absolutely nothing in terms of fitting in with the plot. Perhaps the intention with this whole story was to make the bad guy seem worse, but he was otherwise so two dimensional that it really had next to no impact on me. This is a major problem the whole way through the story, in that the characters are very poorly drawn. We never really get a full picture of any of them and many, particularly the supposedly tiny yet fierce CIA director and the blind priest, feel like caricatures. They may well look quite interesting when the book makes its inevitable way to the screen, but with only words to power them, they are very weak. This made it difficult to get too involved in the story and meant that many of the things that happened to them and the events they were a part of didn't have the impact they might have done. The other thing that has previously annoyed me in Brown's writing and does again here is that he insists on spoon feeding his audience. He explains the solutions to some of the clues in excruciating detail that feels, especially towards the end of the book, as if the reader is being patronised or lectured to. For me, this meant that parts of the book that could have been more exciting were dragged out as Brown showed off his knowledge at the expense of pacing or the plot and made the book quite unevenly paced at points, again most noticeably at the end when what could have been a big finish was ruined when information took over the plot. To be fair to Brown, this is a quite a readable book, as the short chapters and the simplicity of the writing mean the pages turn quite quickly. When the focus of the story is on the chase plot rather than the characters or the clues, the story moves along quite quickly and it's easy to keep reading. Whilst this does happen quite a lot, the inconsistency of the pacing and the introduction of more characters and clues does mean that the longer the book goes on, the more of a slog it becomes. I can see how "The Lost Symbol" may translate well into a film and it may be good for summer beach reading, but as a novel it just didn't do an awful lot for me. It's a well researched plot, but wrapped up in poor characters and pacing and too much showing off from the author to be ultimately successful. However, there are worse books out there, so for a week of lying on a beach with nothing else to do, the page count alone makes it worth the 16 pence it can be found for on eBay, even if the quality of the contents makes it one better off borrowed, as you're only likely to read it the once and you may find even that is once too often.

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        14.02.2011 13:16

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        Based round Masonic secrets and rituals Robert Langdon is the only man for the job.

        Another great novel by Dan Brown that will have you on the egde of your seat from start to end. I could not put it down!!! I would highly recommend this book and it is an excellent compliment to his previous works. It has left me waiting for his next work and wanting more!!! Like his previous novels it is based around Harvard Symbologist Robert Langdon. This story takes you through the Capitol Building in Washington DC and you are transfixed by his descriptions of magnificent artifacts, rooms, corridors, interwoven characters and his journey as you run, literally, through the Captitol Building. This fast paced story is full of many turns and surprises, and with every page it has you wanting more and more. Pulling on Masonic secrets and rituals Robert Langdon is the only man for the job in rescuing his friend and Mason Peter Solomon who has been kidnapped.

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        03.02.2011 15:02
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        Not Dan Browns best

        The lost symbol is the latest novel by Dan Brown creator of the Da Vinci code phenomena. In this novel. his returning here Robert Langdon investigates Masonic clues in Washington, US. The world was first introduced to Robert Langdon in Angel and Demons before the Da Vinci Code, he is a man in his late forties who is an expert in symbolism and the interpretation of the written word. He's a kind of Bletchley park-esque code breaker for the machinations of evil men he keeps meeting. In this story, he is lured to Capitol because he thinks a friend has asked him to do a talk on symbolism, arriving he quickly learns that the friend is missing and the talk is non-existent. A man then nails a hand to the centre of a room at the Capitol and the race against time is on again, Langdon is once again faced with a set of clues which have to be decrypted because the fate of his friend is at state. Alongside this plot is one raised against the friends sister, a scientist called Katherine who has been researching an area called neotic research. Noetic research is research into the concept of humanity away from the bones, tissues and cells it covers such things as meditation, self healing and spirituality. The plot of the book and the demonic desires of Langdons foes are all to do with the desire to eliminate Katherines research and Katherine herself (I work for a scientist called Katherine and sometimes consider....). Anyway the book is by now standard Dan Brown, short sharp chapters always ending on a revelation or a cliff hanger. Short on dialogue and heavy on action it's not the best in terms of writing but he does keep the action flowing to keep the reader from noticing. As with many authors who have invented an expert in the field he has rather slipped into the making Langdon omnipresent who it appears knows everything about any problem which comes his way. The canonisation of Katherine is also amusing, she is the classic driven scientist with lines such as "She was spending her usual pleasurable Saturday afternoon reading the latest scientific journals" for one who works in science there is nothing pleasurable about reading scientific journals. But this is Dan Brown world, Langdon meets a problem and sorts it, then he meets another and sort it out, along side there is a shadowy anti-establishment figure hell-bent on destruction. The storyline is at best laughable and at worst a total rip-off of the first National Treasure movie, all masonic influences on US governments, US buildings and documents all have coded messages indicating a grand cover up. All in all, not Dan Browns best even by Dan Browns lowly standard, not as bad in my opinion as digital fortress but not as good as the best by him which I think is Angels and Demons. Let's hope we don't meet Robert Langdon because I'm sure there will be a film coming soon featuring Tom Hanks and that's too much to bear.

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          12.10.2010 13:19
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          Worth your time, but not your money

          Love it or hate it; you've got to read it either way! Whilst many believe this to be a slow moving, "rushed" and sub-par effort by Dan Brown, i have to respectively dissagree. Whilst the content is somewhat controversial, it is presented in an unbiased and effective manner. Being a fan of technology and science, this book hit the right spots for me (typical Dan Brown!) however i can clearly see why some people have the opinions they do. The story is somewhat typical, the character development is average and the wow factor just isn't there. Sometimes i found this hard to pick up and read; i probably won't be reading this a second time through. If you're a fan of Dan Browns earlier work, you'll find some comfort in this, however, don't be suprised to find out this isn't the masterpiece that was hyped or expected of an author such as Dan Brown. Recommended, but only slightly!

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          13.09.2010 21:48
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          I wouldn't recommend this to anyone

          The Lost Symbol is typical Dan Brown= full of lacklustre mystery, ridiculous plot line and cheesy one liners. The Lost Symbol was slow moving, difficult to get into and down right ridiculous at some points - I never even finished it. There were a few twists but overall the storyline was pretty predictable. I have to admit despite enjoying the Da Vinci Code I have struggled to buy into any of Dan Browns other novels. The most interesting aspect of The Lost Symbol was the interest tid bits of information about the Stonemasons most definately not the storyline which I found very silly. The Lost Symbol is a much over hyped novel, that has basically taken the winning formula of the Da Vinci Code and replicated it. The only people I would recommend this to are fans of the Dan Brown, if you enjoy exciting crime thrillers then I would suggest you pass on The Lost Symbol.

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            11.09.2010 11:21
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            How long can you milk a cow before it goes dry?

            "Yeah... So... Well, pity..." That was kind of the train of words that walked through my mind as I had finished this novel, as I couldn`t help but feel very disappointed, giving the major page turning novels that Dan Brown has produced, such as the insanely famous and popular The Da Vinci Code. What came to mind when reading this book, is how very much Dan Brown appears to be stuck in his ways, he repeats himself to the end that it`s kind of embarassing, and he keeps on using the exact same recipe for the outline of his plot, probably thinking that what has given him success in the past will continue doing so by adding it to his new novels... I tried really hard to ignore how obvious these things were, and for some time, this book was enjoyable and had potential of entertaining me a lot. But there just came a point where I thought "this is just too similar, too identical..." to his previous novels, as the ingredients are the same... The same! On the bright side, this novel certainly is action packed, and it comes with all of those turns and twists of events that you`d expect from a Dan Brown novel, which certainly will entertain especially his fans, but also readers new to the Robert Langdon universe. I will not argue that Brown is very good at creating action, mystery and a high paced story line, and I`m sure that millions of readers will find this novel very entertaining and thrilling, which I totally get! There`s however something about his writing style that I cannot stand, it`s kind of full of itself and uses so many cliches and foolish dialouge sollutions... Once more, we meet up with the main character Robert Langdon, that this time around finds himself in Washington D.C , about to give a lecture for his good friend Peter Solomon. But when he arrives, he notices that the audience is lacking, there`s nothing to see but tourists... Trying to find out what in the world that is going on, he then hears a scream, and running in its direction, he discovers a symbol, leading him to the world of the Freemasons. And the plot goes on from there... There`s just something about this novel that is so similar to the Da Vinci Code, it`s like Brown really is trying to milk the cow for all that it`s worth... Maybe I would`ve enjoyed the book more if I hadn`t read any of Brown`s previous novels, but fact is I cannot get over how identical they`re all made up. So for me, this became a read that just didn`t make it to the top, and all though it had the makings of a page turner here and there, I struggle to recommend it, unless you`re a huge fan of the author, or enjoy these types of page turners more than anything else in the genres of books!

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            04.09.2010 17:10
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            Worth a read but not the best of the series

            The Lost Symbol is the latest book by Dan Brown starring his favorite and most widely known character Robert Langdon. I got the book on release for £2.79 but its retail price is £6.99 at the time. This is the 5th book by Dan Brown and the third featuring Robert Langdon, expert on symbols, cults and ancient long lost mumbo jumbo no one really knows. Robert get tied this time when his friend is kidnapped and he has t decode and crack ancient codes in the hopes that it would lead to answers which could save his friend. The book itself has a number of the famous puzzles broken, codes deciphered and is a good read. It took me roughly 14 hours to finish it and I did enjoy it. In terms of the other books I still rate Angels and Demons higher than this book. However it is worth a read if ancient symbols and Robert Langdons code cracking brain is something that interests you. The story takes primarily in Washington DC and anyone who is familiar with the famous architecture would visualize the book into a movie in their inner eye. A good book to read but definitely not Dan Brown's best piece of work

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            30.08.2010 15:48
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            Disappointing - good ideas spread very thin.

            I really, really wanted to like this book. It promised to have all the usual Dan Brown ingredients: fast pace, mystical concepts tied up with treasures, ancient writings and weird religion, and likable protagonists in glamorous settings. All of these items were there, and in fact the book is an interesting romp through masonic clichés with a nice assortment of labyrinthine plot twists. Several attractive academics run around looking for clues to solving the book's central mystery. The obligatory evil eunuch adds an element of danger: so far so familiar. Without betraying the plot too much, there is an interesting excursus on future science taking place in a cube formed laboratory. Shades of the borg but in a good way. The ancient knowledge is symbolised in a mystical pyramid shape. Geometry appears to be an important theme. I would have liked a little more depth to this angle and a little less pointless chasing through corridors. Reading this book was like watching that old film "Journey to the Centre of the Earth" - the one where you groan when minor characters are introduced because you know that any minute now they will fall down a precipice or be eaten by a monster. The narrative is littered with corpses. I read the book, all of it, and most of the time found it entertaining, but unlike "The Da Vinci Code" this story had no sense of structure, no sense that the author was in control of the narrative. It just went on and on and on, until finally just about all the characters were dead and there was nowhere else to go. Full marks for wordcount, but unfortunately a few more full stops earlier on would have made this a shorter, and much more exciting read.

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              30.08.2010 14:59
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              Not Brown's best work, but fans will find something to enjoy.

              After the incredible success of 'The Da Vinci Code' there have been high expectations and much anticipation for Dan Brown's follow up, his third novel featuring unlikely hero, Harvard professor Robert Langdon. I feel for Dan Brown, as it would have been almost impossible for 'The Lost Symbol' to match the hype that had built up around it and the pressure must have been enormous. However, I cannot lie, I was disappointed by this book. All the elements of a Robert Langdon story were in there, a secret society (The Masons), a long held secret (the key to unlocking the 'Ancient Mysteries'), a mysterious and disturbed lone bad guy (the tattooed Mal'Akh), a race against time, an obstructive official agency (The CIA) and a personal connection for Langdon in the form of a kidnapped friend and mentor whose life depends on Robert's code breaking ability. However, despite utilising everything that made The Da Vinci Code such a success, this new book never manages to match it in terms of sheer page turning excitement and intrigue. The Masons aren't as compelling a secret society as the Illuminati or the Priory of Sion from the previous two books, and the mythology we are introduced to that surrounds them just isn't as interesting or shocking. Maybe because every city and town has a masonic lodge, or because there's been much written and rumoured about them that the reader just isn't all that shocked by the revelations about them. The character of Robert Langdon is written much the same as in the other two books, he's likeable, intelligent and normal enough to be the perfect person to guide the reader through the symbols, riddles and quests of the books. Langdon could be more interesting or have more depth, certainly, but for the purposes of this novel he doesn't need to so I can't fault this character. The secondary characters are reasonably well written but it is the nature of this kind of story that the action takes precedence over character development. We know enough about their motivations and prejudices to understand why they act as they do and that's more or less all we need. This isn't an in depth character study! The story gets off to a fairly slow start in comparison to Dan Brown's previous work, I was expecting to be fairly gripped from the beginning but was disappointed, things didn't really start to get intriguing until about a third of the way in. Even then, there isn't the breakneck pace of the Da Vinci code that made it impossible to put that book down and compelled you to put your life on hold because you just had to read the next chapter! Its fairly easy to put The Lost Symbol down and do something else for a bit without your mind wandering back to the story. There are puzzles and codes to be cracked in this book, most readers would be very disappointed if they were missing from a Dan Brown book! However, there aren't as many as in the previous novels and fans who enjoy this aspect of Dan Brown's writing might be disappointed. The solutions to these puzzles aren't the 'wow' revelations of the previous two books either. I realise I seem highly critical of this novel, I should point out that it certainly wasn't terrible and I did enjoy some parts of it very much. The action packed climax is very tense and compelling with a few twists and turns although most of them not all that unexpected! If this had been a first novel I'd be looking forward to seeing what the author could do in a second, but as this follows on the heels of two very successful previous works, it can't help but be a disappointment. I will probably read it again at some point but not for quite a while.

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                25.08.2010 12:13
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                Dan Brown's 5th Novel

                After the successes of both Angels and Demons and The Da Vinci Code, everyone knew that Dan Brown would struggle to top them. The Lost Symbol was released six years after The Da Vinci Code, and regardless of how good or bad it is, many a person wanted to buy it. I mean the previous too were so popular, what do you expect? It became the fastest selling adult book of all time, and was in the New York Times Best Seller list for over four months. I imagine that the two films that were released before The Lost Symbol arrived boosted sales by quite a lot too. If you are not familiar with Dan Brown's works, he has written five novels to date. Three of them are part of a series, and feature the recurring character of symbologist Robert Langdon. Now by the time we've reached The Lost Symbol, Langdon has already had a right escapade at Vatican City, where the entire country was under threat of being blown to bits - that's Angels and Demons - and followed a series of codes and stuff in The Da Vinci Code. One thing Dan Brown was good at in these two novels is keeping the reader hooked. Short, snappy chapters that often ended on cliff-hangers left the reader really wanting to know what happened next. There were twists and turns that were really exciting and very effective, and it made for a gripping read - in both cases. Angels and Demons is my favourite of the two, but I found that both were quite predictable... The Lost Symbol features Robert Langdon, once again. But this time, he's been called to come to Washington D.C., to give a lecture for a very close (and successful) friend of his: Peter Solomon. Solomon is a 33rd degree Mason. The lecture is to take place at the United States Capitol building. But, when Langdon arrives, there is no audience waiting for him in the National Statuary Hall. Instead, there are tourists. Langdon goes back to check with the receptionist, who has no idea what he's on about. And then he hears a scream. Running back into the Hall, he sees a shocking object in the middle of the floor, bearing ancient symbols that relate to the Freemason world. The symbols direct Langdon to go underground, in to the Capitol's basement. At this point, he has come across the ruthless head of the CIA's Office of Security, Inoue Sato, who views Langdon as a suspect, and refuses to let him out of his sight. When Langdon goes underground, he begins a new quest, where he must solve a series of symbols to discover some of Washington D.C.'s hidden secrets, whilst being chased around the Capital. Meanwhile, Mal'akh, a mysterious character, who has tattooed his entire body except for a circular area on his head, prepares himself for an ultimate, dark ritual, whilst threatening to uncover some of these hidden secrets that D.C. holds. The heat is on guys! The Lost Symbol revolves around the theme of Freemasonry, the mysterious, ancient organisation, and also a field of science called Noetics. Just like the Roman Catholic Church in Angels and Demons, and the entire Christian Church, Opus Dei and the Priory of Sion in The Da Vinci Code, secrets are revealed. Brown explains rituals and secrets through the narrative, which often shock the reader. The thing that was lost in The Lost Symbol was this "shockability" factor - the element of surprise. Brown provides us with twists and eyebrow-raising "facts" (I'd advise you not to actually believe the majority of what Brown feeds you) that are most often anticlimactic or simply ineffective. He has you on the edge of your seat, wanting you to read on to the next chapter, and yes, occasionally, he'll provide you with a surprising moment, but most of the time, you'll be let down. This occurs right up to the final page. The characterisation in The Lost Symbol is adequate at best. Firstly, you have the recurring protagonist that is Robert Langdon. I don't like him, personally. He is far from an anti-hero, but his pompousness and arrogance is sometimes frustrating. He's a know-it-all, but as a lecturer of Symbology at one of the top Universities in the world (Harvard, this is...), it's not all surprising, so Brown captures this well. As for other characters in the books, most of them are characterised poorly. To be honest, characters weren't portrayed particularly well in the previous two Langdon instalments, but in The Lost Symbol, descriptions and actions are too typical to be regarded original or interesting. The story itself is quite typical and predictable. I feel like, once you've read the other two Langdon novels, you're not going to get anything new. Yes, it's a new plot, there are new characters, and it's a whole new topic that Brown can inform you about, but The Lost Symbol doesn't go any further than that. In fact, the novel, at times, becomes more of a knowledge spill - or rather, a research spill. Dan Brown has researched and researched and made up some stuff too, and he inserts it into his narrative, and it can become tedious. Griping aside, the story isn't all bad. There is interest there, and I did enjoy reading it, but like I say, there's nothing unique after you've read the other two. The Lost Symbol isn't as good as Angels and Demons or The Da Vinci Code, but it's readable and enjoyable nonetheless. The Lost Symbol is a good book, but is a book that features flaws and unoriginality. It was a disappointment to me after reading Angels and Demons and The Da Vinci Code. However, you will be shocked at times, and you will be very interested at times, and you will most likely enjoy a lot of the book, but I can't give it anymore than a 3-star rating. I did enjoy it, but reflecting on the novel after completion, I wasn't satisfied. Dan Brown doesn't deliver in The Lost Symbol. The effect is over. ISBN-10: 059305427X ISBN-13: 978-0593054277

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                  13.08.2010 15:33

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                  New novel and brilliant read.

                  The lost symbol - Dan Brown I have been a fan of Dan Browns work for a few years now since i discovered him as a writer due to all the hype that surrounded the release of his first book - The Da Vinci Code and the subsequent Movies. The Da Vinci Code, was a must read at the time and i gave it a go although i was skeptical that it would live up to some of the reviews but was pleasantly surprised and i went on to read further novels by Brown such as - Angels and Demons, Deception point and Digital Fortress. All of which i greatly enjoyed and love to read again and again. When i saw this new outing by Brown i just had to have it and i am so glad i bought it. Dan Brown is a bit like marmite you either love it or you hate it and i am definately a fan but understand that not everyone likes his style. The lost symbol takes us on a journey through the political heartland of America and shows us the hidden world of the Freemasons. Typical to Dan Browns novels and writing style this book is full of conspiracy theory, religion, symbology, secret societys and ancient knowledge its all here with a healthy dose of adventure and action. Its a fast paced and gripping read, a must have for Dan Brown Fans or for those wanting to get a bit more of a well rounded story then the movies provide.

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                  11.08.2010 22:03
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                  All in all a very good book

                  Once again our much beloved Harvard Symbologist, Robert Langdon travels extensively throughout Washington D.C as he dabbles once again in the mysterious depths of Freemasonry. Robert attends a lecture in the United States Capitol at the request of a previous mentor later introduced as Peter Solomon, a 33rd Degree Mason. However, all is not what it appears as a simple trip to see and old friend quickly escalates into something a whole lot more dangerous. After reading Dan Brown's previous novels (The Da Vinci Code, Angels and Demons, Deception Point, and Digital Fortress) and thoroughly enjoying them, I couldn't wait for this book to be released. I found myself picking it up whenever I got the chance, and grimacing at the fact that I'd ever have to put it down again, (through sadly as I'm human I did need the odd toilet/food/drink break.) The book feels oddly familiar with a mixture of old and new and seems to echo that of its predecessors The Da Vinci Code and Angels and Demons, in that it delivers a fast, action packed story with lots of running and thinking time dedicated to the plot yet somehow manages to reinvent itself and be in a league of its own. The novel is fast paced, quick witted and extremely intriguing with its constant twist and turns, as well as Brown's groundbreaking and (almost to the point of tedious) research, through which he is renowned for (especially amongst his other works). The books attention to detail is incredible, and if in doubt about the facts stated in the book (such as Masonic traditions), your mind is put to rest by a simple disclaimer at the very beginning of the book. The book is also great for science lovers as it introduces the reader to the notion of breathable oxygen liquid and Noetic science (the somewhat spiritual side of science.) The book does have its weaknesses however such as the lack of character. Not that there aren't enough of them, far form it, but they seem to cry out to be explored more thoroughly and a lack of information and background does slightly disappoint. Also the ending is somewhat "drip- drab" as the books main antagonist Mal`akh, appears to just fade away slightly towards the end of the novel, without any real theatrical drama. The copy I received a few months ago was good value for money (costing £10 in Tesco) and comes with a sleek cover that is thought- provoking, as the front cover contains a symbol of a key, but to what you may ask? Well you'll have to read it to find that one out. Even the blurb pulls you into Browns imaginatively colourful world almost effortlessly. All in all a very good read.

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                  10.08.2010 21:10

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                  Interesting in parts but I didn't particularly enjoy this book

                  I was a big fan of Angels and Demons and The Da Vinci Code so I was looking forward to reading Dan Brown's latest offering. However, I was pretty disappointed with The Lost Symbol. The balance between information and storyline was heavily in favour of information with the effect that the novel was disjointed and lacking in drive and pace. Not enough time was invested into the characters and I felt as though I didn't really care about any of them. I felt that not enough information was given about the villain, including why he was behaving in the way that he was. I also found Robert Langdon's skeptisicm to get a bit annoying after a while. At some points it was just taken too far with the result that Robert Langdon became slightly unbelievable at times. On the plus side, the information given about Masonic legends and American history and symbology was interesting and I think die-hard Dan Brown fans will love The Lost Symbol because of this. Overall, I did not particularly like this book although it was interesting in parts.

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