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AMD Athlon 64 3000+ / 2 GHz

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£349.00 Best Offer by: amazon.co.uk marketplace See more offers
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      04.11.2005 03:45
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      it`s a very good processors it brings to your home the new age... buy it!

      AMD 64bit is very good it gives you so much speed and performance i have a amd 64bit 3000+ 2mb cache memmory and i can say it serves me very good.i also have windows professional 64bit edition and i can say that my computer eats everything :D i can say that an adm64 is a very good investion.if you need something with ultimate performance a think an AMD64 FX is that what you seek.the amd processors are not expensive and you can buy a very good configuration. i forgot to add some info the 64bit processor uses the whole CPU not like the 32bit and this is why it gives more power to your engines,more speed and performance.nowdays speed and performance are the key.i can say that amd will face some sirius competition because intel is preparing theirs 64bit processors...

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        01.07.2005 03:31
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        Solid Performer, Great HSF, Optimal price point.

        I could bore you with technical specifications but that information is available in great detail everywhere. Suffice to say that this CPU will support the 64 bit operating systems when they eventually come out, and performs really well as it has a lot of cache and a 400mhz FSB with HyperThreading.

        The price point will attract most people. Don't go for the most expensive CPU on the market, these are priced much too high for the marginal performance gains you get. This chip runs at 2Ghz. To get a slightly faster chip running at 2.4Ghz let's say, you have to nearly double the price. Not worth it for a 20% increase in CPU speed, which only equates to a 10-15% increase in overall system performance, depending on wha t you are doing.

        The 3000 figure is intended to let you make a price comparison with a Pentium 4 of that clock speed. AMD reckon this performs as well as a 3ghz P4. I'd agree, and go as far as to say it's a bit faster in a lot of games.

        Enough of the boring tech specs though, what I really want to talk about is the Heatsink and Fan.

        This is the boxed retail version of the chip, which is a bit more expensive, up to £20 in some places, than the OEM. It differs from the OEM version in that you get a nice looking box, a warranty with AMD, a sticker (woo!), and most importantly the AMD Heatsink and Fan.

        This is a lovely bit of kit, the spring mechanism for holding it to the motherboard is sublime, providing precisely the correct amount of force to hold it in place. You can't really crush the core on a 64, as they have a solid metal lid these days, but there is certianly no danger of it with this lovely heatsink. Nice big plastic-tipped clips make installing and removing the CPU very easy indeed.

        You get a standard blob of thermal compound, more than adequate to attach the unit to the nice flat surface of the chip.

        It's big! This is a good thing as there's lots of surface area to dissapate the heat. The fan is very quiet, and when you connect it to a motherboard that supports "Cool-N-Quiet" (rubbish name, great technology) it senses how hot the CPU is, and slows the fan down and speeds it up accordingly. If it is cool enough, the CPU fan actually switches itself off.

        I didn't think that my CPU would ever get cool enough for the CPU fan to be off, or if it did it wouldn't be off for very long. I was pleased to be mistaken. Since the heatsink is so large, it works quite well without a fan. This combined with the XP64's relatively low heat output means that unless you tax your machine and start running heavy processes, the fan stays off most of the time. Fantastic for those of us who sleep in the same room as our PC, or require quiet operation.

        Well worth the extra few quid over the OEM. Forget about overclocking, stick to default speeds and use Cool-N-Quiet with the retail HSF for a stable, quiet, yet still rapid machine.

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          10.03.2005 21:40
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          I reciently purchased one of these little beauties to replace my aging but servicabel athlon XP setup.
          Once in installed - which was very quick and easy, thanks to an improved heatsink retension mechanisme - I was struck by how much smoother the whole experance of using my computer was. Apps loaded noticabaly faster, games that were unplayable before were transformed to full smooth motion.
          With the same vidio card installed, my 3dmark01 score went up from ~9000 to just under 18000 points, it doubbled!

          The processor also is a fair overclocker, for those who arnt familiar with overclocking it is running the processor at a higher frequency than specifyed but maintaining relyability. I run my 3000+ at ~2.4GHz instead of the rated 2GHz and as a result enjoy the performance of a much more expensive processor.I did this on the supplyed heatsink and fan and have never had a problem with heat.

          I would recomend this processor to anyone wanting to upgrated to the modern world or looking for the best price/performance available.

          all this is without going in to the possabilities of 64bit capabilities or the built in virus protection provided byNX-bit.

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            08.03.2005 21:56
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            THE CHOICE

            I recently decided it was time to finally give my ancient Athlon 500-based system a rest and build a new one (on a budget of around £400). Obviously the CPU is a fairly important choice to make when building a new computer so I put in a lot of thought and research and eventually settled on the AMD Athlon64 3000+ for my new machine. The current price of the 3000+ model makes it only slightly more expensive than the 2800+ and actually cheaper than the equivalent AthlonXP! There's no Intel processor available that can touch it at this price. I paid around £95 for the P-I-B (Processor-In-Box) package, which includes everything you need.

            The Athlon64 comes in various varieties, 754pin, 939pin, FX and a range of speeds, all of which have slight differences and may require different motherboards. The 3000+ I chose is a 754pin processor (at the budget end of the scale) with 128kb L1 cache, 512kb L2 cache and actual clock speed of just over 2 GHz. AMD use an equivalent performance marking system to rate their processor speeds – so whilst the clock speed of this ‘3000+’ chip is 2ghz, its performance is equivalent to at least a 3ghz Pentium 4 – a common misconception is that clock speed (the ghz/mhz number) is the be all and end all of a processor – most certainly not the case.


            INSTALLATION

            The retail pack comes in a very nice looking box complete with instructions, heatsink/fan and the processor itself. For the extra couple of quid over the OEM processor, this package is really worth it, mostly for the 3 year warranty that’s also included. The diagrammatical instructions aren't perfect but fitting the CPU is a doddle really, just lift the lever on your motherboard, drop it into the socket with the corners matching, and push the lever down to slot it in, voila!

            I put some extra Antec thermal grease on the heatsink before fitting (as I’d heard this would help with heat transfer from the chip to the cooler); though I'm not sure I spread it around enough to be honest. I found fitting the heatsink/fan a little confusing (instructions not much help there) but got there in the end. The system booted first time, but does seem to be running a little hot – between 50 and 60C - is this normal for the Athlon64 or have I done something wrong? I'd like to experiment with overclocking the CPU but with it already at this temp I'm not sure it's a great idea.


            PERFORMANCE

            My new system (Abit NF8, 512mb Crucial DDR400, 120GB Seagate ATA133, Radeon 9550 256mb) installed Windows XP in about 10-15mins and boots in about 15-20s. I currently get just over 10000 on 3DMark01 but am sure this would rocket with a better graphics card.

            The chip handles processor-intensive jobs such as audio/video encoding well, and is superb at multi-tasking as long as there’s nothing too complicated going on (though more RAM would improve this).

            Having used various other computers but nothing as powerful as this, I was amazed by the instancy and responsiveness of everything I do; it really is noticeably faster, I'm sure this wonderful processor is at least partly responsible for this. Programs install in seconds, not minutes and I can finally run all the games and programs I want. Admittedly, I'm not running any 64-bit software at the moment and doubt I will be for a year or two but it's nice to know I'm future-proofed to a degree. I look forward to the full release of Windows XP64 which will give this chip an opportunity to really shine.


            CONCLUSION

            So overall, top marks for the Athlon64 3000+, at this price it's the obvious choice for any budget/mid-range machine. Just the one niggle and that's the high temperature - if anyone has any ideas how to get this down a bit (if it's out of the ordinary that is, without ridiculously expensive cooling systems) please do let me know. Cheers!

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              11.10.2004 19:14
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              The AMD 64 has been out a while now, it's a shame that more hasn't been done with this technology. The model I am reviewing has a 1MB cache - there doesn't seem to be a category here for that - everything I say should qualify for both models, although there maybe a drop in performance on the 512Kb cache version. Even 512Kb is a decent amount of cache memory though.

              To explain briefly, when people refer to 'bits' in this context, they're referring to how much information the chip can deal with at any one time - 64 bits is better than 32 because more data is being dealt with in one go. (Ok, I know that's really abstracting it all you geeks out there, but I'm just trying to give people a rough idea.)

              Most processors used at home these days are still 32 bit, which is fair enough - Windows XP is a 32 bit operating system, and the majority of applications out there have been optimised for this. To be honest for word processing, email and other mundane tasks, 32 bit should be sufficient.

              Games, video decoding, high end graphics work and number crunching, however, would make great use of a 64 bit chip.

              The thing that puts a lot of people off upgrading is that the 64 bit processors that were previously available were 64 bit ONLY and required special operating systems to operate. The beauty of the latest AMD 64 range is that it is backwards compatible with 32 bit software.

              Certain games such as Unreal 2004 and Farcry are touting 64 bit versions of their games - that is one reason to purchase one of these chips, but other than that you will be waiting a long time to see these things taxed.

              It runs Windows XP like a dream, and runs the beta version of Windows 64 too. Windows 64 is still very unfinished on the whole, and getting drivers / third party software for it is a nightmare. Once you've got working graphics, sound and network drivers though you can try out some of the special '64 bit' versions of certain programs and feel good about the money you've spent on this expensive piece of kit.

              The beta is time limited and a free download - well worth a look for owners of one of these processors. It's AMD only - Intel have their own version but that's not really for domestic use.

              I have an Athlon 64 3000+ and a normal Athlon XP 3000+ in this household - there is a slight difference in speed - the chances are this comes more from the larger Cache size of the Athlon 64 (1Mb on this version). The true power of this chip isn't really used by current software yet.

              In terms of benchmarks, the 3DMark improved a little because of the improved processor test results, but as 3DMark relies a lot on the graphics card I found this to be a limiting factor. The Final Fantasy 11 benchmark ran on two near identical specced machines saw nearly a 2000 point difference in favour of the AMD 64. (For those who care the difference is in hard drive capacity although both had ample free space - graphics card, memory, etc the same including RAM speed were the same - just the motherboard and processor changed.)

              If you buy this processor, you will most likely need to change your motherboard, and you will be making your old fan redundant too - the Athlon 64 is of different dimensions to most of the other processors and the socket is different enough that most old fans won't fit on it.

              I would recommend sticking with the fan that comes with the processor for a little while - there are other fans available but they aren't up to scratch yet - the cooling provided by the default fan is actually superior for a change.

              The processor comes in a very, very well sealed plastic package, with it's own fan and an installation manual that shows the new, slightly unusual way of putting the fan on. It even has a URL to a video of someone doing it, in case you get confused. The new fan mounting includes a plate on the back of the motherboard, which makes for a very secure attachment.

              Other than that, all I can say is fit as normal, install the operating system, and run. It seems to respond fairly well to a little over-clocking (I haven't went too far with it though). and under normal conditions is rock solid stable, if a little warm when under heavy load.

              I would recommend this processor - although if you have the money to spend get the FX 53 version, or a slightly faster version of this. There is some future proofing in the fact that this bears the flag of '64 bit' but by the time something in the mainstream actually USES that feature the extra speed may well be welcome.

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            • Product Details

              You live at the forefront of technology, and you won't settle for less from your favorite software. That's why AMD is proud to bring you the AMD Athlon 64 processor, with AMD64 technology for dramatically higher performance and built-in support for future 64-bit applications - even running 32- and 64-bit software at the same time. Maximize system efficiency and stay ahead of the curve with the technically superior PC processor, packed with advances such as HyperTransport technology and an integrated DDR memory controller. Whether it is for business, school or play, with the AMD Athlon 64 processor, you can address your current and future computing needs.