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Pubs in Cambridgeshire in general

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      07.03.2010 17:34

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      Worth a visit, but not for the advertised "carvery".

      We've just been here for the first time for Sunday lunch. A nice pub with very nice staff, but a bizarre idea of what constitutes a "carvery". I you go there expecting "carvery" to mean that joints of proper, actual meat are carved in front of you, prepare to reassess your worldview. At the Greyhound you are presented with four rectangular trays all full of identically shaped, thin slices of supermarket style "deli" meat, processed into large tube shapes, curling under the lights. Ugh! I knew the first tray contained either chicken or turkey (turned out it was what passes for turkey in Greyhoundland), as it was white meat, but the other three could have been anything. I had to ask what this amorphous and sorry looking collection was and replied in the affirmative on the mention of lamb. Turned out even the attractive young lady serving couldn't tell the difference either as I got pork! And, yes, the meat really did taste like processed rubbish. To be fair the remaining part of the "carvery" meal was ok, but if you want a "carvery" for goodness sake avoid this place. Perhaps they've been so rattled by the mythical ghost they don't like hanging about long enough to roast proper meat.

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      09.09.2006 20:51

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      accidently found Queens Head in Newton and have been talking about the good wine - rare roast beef sandwich and brown soup ever since.A must try for everyone - a perfect country pub experience.

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      03.08.2006 18:22
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      The food, hospitality un comparable

      My husband and I visited England in May and June of 2004, We got a self catering cottage in Barbraham, For 18 wonderful days we explored England. But in all our outtings for food our favorite was The Greyhound Pub in Sawston. The food was short of miraculous. Truly a gastonomic treat. Before we left freiends told us to pack antacids and the like because England was not known for their culinary abilities. We did not believe it, I having grown up with an English Mum. Anyway we stumbled on the Greyhound by accident and out of the 18 days we eat dinner there 12 nights. The appetizer of garlic mushrooms, sublime. Stilton chicken absolute miricle. We had the mushrooms everynight. And I think I had the chicken 4-5 times. My husband enjoyed his steaks to no end. If in Sawston it is a must. And please if she is still there say a hello to Ruth. The most pleasant waitress in all the world.

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        28.03.2002 00:06
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        Should I be ashamed? I was just having a typical night out at my favourite Cambridgeshire pub. Standing at the bar, instead of rushing to serve me like they normally do (well, before I moved to Essex), the staff began to speculate as to whether I actually lived in the pub. My friend was even more of a sad case (although he's moved away now too - oh, how they must miss us both); he was the last to leave at night and the first to grace its doors in the morning. His excuse? "Well, they do an excellent fried breakfast." Let's see... yes, they may have had a point. The first half of my birthday was spent in that pub, countless New Year's Eves were spent in that pub, I danced, sang, laughed, barfed, cried, pissed, kissed, ate, met date (s - trying to keep up a little rhyme here, in case you hadn't noticed) and, naturally, drank in... the Robin Hood. Now, this opinion is about the pubs in St Ives. It may only be a small market town (not to be confused with the Cornwall town) but St Ives boasts over a dozen pubs; there are loads in the town centre, some hidden down alleyways, some by the river Ouse, others all in a row (handy when you've reached stumbling stage). I had to start, of course, with my so-called second home, and the Robin is certainly rockin' on a Saturday night. I was 16 when I got my first taste of the place. Me and the girls had met some older guys (weren't we cool) and managed to sneak in the back entrance to drink cider in the back room, which had a pool table (those really were the olden days; that pool table has long gone). Unfortunately we were soon chucked out and it was a while before we had the nerve to try and get in there again. But it was such fun living in St Ives at 17! Where's the thrill now of trying to get past the bouncers? One friend turned 18 before the rest of us, but we joined her on her nights out, carryin g borrowed ID (in those days all we needed someone else's driving license). This was fine until one nasty bouncer asked me for my license no. I ws cocky, saying "Come on, who knows their license number" and he agreed, asking me my date of birth. But I'd been thrown offguard and got it wrong! Silly me... Anyway, let me describe the Robin Hood. I just love the smell of the place; that brewers smell, plain and simple. It's always dimly lit in there, a welcome retreat from the sunshine during a summer's day, and 'atmospheric' at night. The bar's in the middle and there's comfy seating running along the window with wooden tables and stools. To the left of the bar, a DJ (and his box) can be found on Sat. nights, and a handful of fruit machines. To the right there's a step (watch out! I've tripped before and many a 'giant' has banged his head on the low ceiling stepping up it) and two more tables by a fireplace, with a huge screen in the corner for the football fans to get their fix (and this place is PACKED during England games). The room at the back is often empty, although you can sit in there and have food, or a private party (oo-er). Then there's a poky loo with 2 cubicles for women, and a loo for men (may have been in there... can't quite remember). Out the back is a nice patio with about 4 benches. This is where I spent my 19th birthday; my then-boyfriend plied me with pints of cider that contained the added ingredients of Baileys (how could I not have noticed how it curdled?!) and vodka. There's a photo of me leaning against my boyfriend (unable to sit up straight I was practically lying on the bench) laughing my head off. I'm sure it was a birthday to remember. If only I could. Anyway, the pub is a favourite with leather-clad motorbikers, students, hen parties etc alike. It's a real mix of St Ives folk and I love the way, if I was to stroll in there tomorrow there'd be at least one person I'd know. There's a juke box, and on Friday nights you can often hear the Pulp Fiction soundtrack playing, or some indy tunes. They refurbished it recently; strangely enough just after my friends and I decided to dance on the chairs and I banged my head on a lampshade, making it wonky. The young bar staff are quick to serve you... but when they started calling me the 'Smirnoff Ice girl' producing a bottle and putting it on the counter before the words were out of my mouth, I wondered if I should sample Smirnoff elsewhere... A few shops up the road and you're outside the Golden Lion. It's actually a hotel but has a large pub downstairs. I call this place the 'disco' pub; it has that kind of atmosphere. Weekends see (hear!) a DJ, loud upbeat dance music blaring. After a recent refurbishment however, the place is reminiscent of a supermarket. Whose bright idea was it to introduce the artificial strip lighting and automatic doors?! They were very kind though when a friend was overambitious and tried to jump from the table onto a chair (yes, the ol' furniture-dancing again) but landed awkwardly on the carpet. She'd actually broken her ankle and was lifted into an ambulance, the DJ having called it, switching off his music. The prices of drinks in the Robin and Lion are pretty much the same; around £1.15 for a half, £2.30 for a pint (I think; I rarely buy 'em) and £2.60 for bottles. Over the road is The White Hart. I used to think this was an old man's pub until I was co-erced inside, and realised it was actually quite nice; small and snug. Perhaps it wasn't wise for 4 of us to smuggle in our bottles of Smirnoff Ice purchased at the Robin and casually put them on the table in the Hart - they don't actually sell Smirnoff Ice! The pub 's split into 2 sections with 2 bars; one near a pool table, the other in a small room with lots of wood and a fireplace. No music. Another 'image-revamp' has occured at Floods. Formerly an old man's pub (fishermen, British legion etc) it now attracts the young 'uns, although there are still some of the old clientele (a few who like to perv!). Nice food, narrow (and watch out for the step as you leave; you never notice it when you go in). Perhaps one of the attractions of the place is the cheap(er) drinks. It's a long pub (encourages intimate contact) with a few fruit machines and a garden area... By the river you'll find the aptly named The Dolphin. A fave with students, this hotel is packed out in the summer as there's a huge outside patio. You can see the bridge from your seat and sit and watch the boats go past My only complaints are the slow service (get more staff in!) and the fact I got locked in there once! I'd been to the loo and couldn't get out! My friends were laughing at me through the window; fort. a smirking bouncer released me before I could start panicking... There's 2 bars; one in an open airy room, and another in the posher 'family-function hotelly foody bit. You'll see the odd bride milling around as the place hosts a lot of wedding parties (although when me and a friend turned up for one we invaded someone else's by accident! Now we know that there are TWO bridal suites for parties... it's easy to wander in and out though) Onto the bars... The Lounge, formerly The Birdcage (put a lot of blokes from going in there), fondly remembered as Broadways (when I was 16 this was the coolest place in town; I could only dream of getting in there)/ Even now, it's known as the place where the beautiful people go. Image, posing... Strange place though, really. You walk in and there's a packed, too-small bar and a bigger back room with comfy armchairs, then there's a cellar bar which is all wood and mirrors (and cold!). Out the back there's a yard with an outside bar and heated lighting. The music's totally house and I like the brightly coloured straws they give you with your bottles! The Ice Bar has just opened but I haven't experienced the place yet; it used to be a bowling bar, now it's app. got green armchairs and poles! That's the town centre pubs covered (oh, there's also the Royal Oak (for older people, I find) and the Aviator - popular on thursdays as they have a jammin' session night where local bands play; you can plonk around on drums etc). Ooh, and my old local (tastes change; funny how everyone decides to suddenly go somewhere else every weekend) The Nelson's Head. Down a narrow sidestreet, this pub is like a tardis. It's long and thin and is home to hot nuts and there's a real smell of wood when you enter. At the back there's a pool table and a dartboard, and there's a miniscule garden with 2 tables. One complaint: there's never any music and I need music! Where's the atmosphere? But strangely enough they do play soft music from speakers in the loos! Down an alley there's a tiny but pretty pink pub called the Oliver Cromwell. The regulars are old men who prop up the bar and chat to anyone, and it's nice for a change. Well, all this talk of the St Ives pub scene is making me feel rather homesick because where I live now, there's limited choice... My second home will always be waiting for me though, should I return to St Ives...

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          16.06.2001 11:34
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          THE ANCHOR INN Sutton Gault Sutton Ely Cambridgeshire This is a quaint little pub in the heart of the Cambridge Fenland countryside. It is rated as four diamonds in the AA Guest book and is also found in ?The Good Food Guide?, ?Good Hotel Guide?, ?Good Pub Guide? and ??Which? Guide to Country Pubs?. The Anchor was built around 1650 on the ?Hundred Foot Drain? (New Bedford River) to provide food and shelter for the men conscripted to dig the Fen rivers. It has been a hostelry ever since. It is a popular public house, so the booking of tables, particularly at weekends is advisable, to avoid disappointment. The floor is undulating, with the scrubbed pine tables. The atmosphere is cosy and intimate, with a roaring log fire in winter and glowing gaslights. Antique prints on the walls and dark oak beams and panels are also the order of the day. ?A little piece of heaven anchored in fenland? describes Paddy Burt (Daily Telegraph). Heather and Robin Moore are the owners for more than ten years and have won many of the major food guide awards. The pub is informal, yet the hospitality is second to none, as is the cuisine and service. The Anchor Pub promotes British food and uses locally grown vegetables where possible. The menu consists of food delivered fresh, daily to the pub. Seasonal foods allow the menu to be changed daily. The food is tasty without being fussy. Menu: Meals are served daily both at lunchtime and in the evenings. There is a comprehensive selection of starters and main courses. Vegetarians are catered for, but if a Vegan meal is require, prior arrangements should be made. Desserts are all home made, except for the organic ice cream. There are usually half a dozen sweets to choose from at any one time. If cheese and biscuits are desired, then there is a selection of six unusual British farmhouse cheeses to choose from. A selection of coffees, t eas and herbal infusions are available following the meal. Each hot drink is accompanied with a home-made biscuit. This will bring any three course meal to a delicious close. Cost: The set lunchtime meal, available on a weekday costs around £7.50 per person. The Sunday lunch (booking is strongly advised) costs around £16.50, for a three course meal, per person. A la Carte menu and The Specials Board are also available. Opening Times: Bar Opens: 12noon-3pm daily From 7pm Monday to Friday From 6.30pm Saturday From 7pm Sunday Meals Served from: 12noon-2pm daily From 7pm to 9pm Monday to Friday From 6.30pm to 9.30pm Saturday From7pm-9pm Sunday Other Faculties Offered: Real Ales straight from the cask. Wines: Wine and Gourmet evenings Choice of six wines by the glass An award winning 100 bin wine list Reservations: Booking for meals, plus group bookings accepted. Credit Card: All major cards accepted. No Smoking: The majority of eating areas are non-smoking. All bedrooms are non-smoking. Disabled Access: Accessible except the bedrooms. Children?s Menu: Half portions are provided where possible. River Terrace: Alfresco eating is available on warm days. Newsletter: Free mailing list for all customers. Accommodation: ?A Spacious Suite? consists of a double bedroom and sitting room. The ensuite bathroom consists of a shower, toilet, bidet, and luxury corner bath. This room can accommodate up to three people. ?Charming Twin Room? with ensuite shower and toilet. Both rooms have tea and coffee making facilities, direct dial telephone and remote control telephone, in the newly furnished and decorated rooms. Where to find The Anchor Inn: It is situated between Earith and Sutt on just off the B1381, about 15 miles from the heart of Cambridge. The Anchor Inn Sutton Gault Sutton Ely Cambridgeshire CB6 2BD Telephone: 01353 778537 Fax: 01353 776180 Email: anchor@suttongault.freeserve.co.uk I took my parents out for a meal to celebrate my father?s birthday, last year (April 2000). It was the last trip that I had out with my father before he died. Sunday 1st April was my father?s birthday. To remember him, I took my mother out along with my brother and hubby Shane for Sunday lunch, this year. We were once again made to feel relaxed and comfortable. The food was freshly cooked. Yes, we had to wait, but we were never rushed either. Our table was booked for 12.45hrs. We did not have to wait to be seated. Our drinks were brought to the table once order and we enjoyed a leisurely meal, leaving at about 3.30pm, feeling full and content. I cannot wait for my next visit.

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            12.11.2000 15:08
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            The Queen's Head at Newton (the village is a few miles south of Cambridge) is one of a slowly-dwindling band of old-fashioned pubs, where little has changed for generations. You won't find foamy mock-Irish beer, plastic beams or alcopops here. This is an old building which has been run by the same landlord for over 25 years. Throughout this time it's been featured in most of the good-beer guides. They serve perfectly-kept Adnams Real Ales from barrels on the back of the bar, and Real Food [bloody roast beef sandwiches - also beef dripping, 'Humphreys', smoked salmon etc etc]. There's always a huge soup tureen bubbling away and, if you ask what flavour it is, the publican will peer under the lid, sniff, and announce "Brown". Prices are extremely reasonable, and quality unsurpassed with local direct suppliers being used for all the produce. The place looks generally a bit worn, and there's generations of candlewax drippings accreted on the candlesticks. Public health Inspectors please drink elsewhere! You can play bar skittles in one corner, or sit against a glowing fire in an inglenook. The pub gets really busy on weekday lunchtimes (especially Fridays), when half of the research teams from Cambridge University come here for lunch, so you need to arrive at 12.30 to get a seat. There are a few tables for sitting outside, and the village green across the road, but both these are close to the road. There's some good playground equipment on the green, if your children need amusement, but this pub's not really children-friendly. I rate this for ambience and traditional good value: I hope it never changes.

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