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  • A ... - Little Tables
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    Your dooyooMiles Miles

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      09.05.2001 05:35
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      • "A ... - Little Tables"

      The sun was shinning and the birds were singing and it was the May Day bank holiday ... the only decisions I had to make were where t0 go and what to do ... Ahh, what bliss. A wander up one of Glasgow’s finest avenues was the answer to a maiden’s prayer. Well, to be more precise, a saunter up one of Glasgow’s finest Roads - Byres Road - was the answer but - as for the ‘answer to a maidens ...’ bit ... that’s for another dooyoo opinion, not this one. As I said, the sun was shinning and it was the May Day holiday; I repeat myself here as I’m still not sure if I dreamed it and I’m about to wake up and find that it’s all been a dream and the weather was its usual awful Bank Holiday self. I digress. Auldmac and myself were taking it easy along Byres Road, one of my ... no scratch that and make it ... my favourite place in Glasgow - when we decided to ‘chill out’ in one of our regular ‘watering holes’. (oh, she knows all the hip terminology now, so she does) When I say ‘watering holes’, those who ‘know’ my ‘other half’ may find my linking his name with water - and having both words in the same sentence to boot a little off-putting. In this instance however, let me put your mind at rest and explain that we were in the habit of visiting a wee * coffee shop * in Cresswell Lane, just of Byres Road whenever we were in the area. (We had not been in the area for several moths due to pressure of work, you see. ) (... those of you unlikely to visit this area should simply ignore the last few sentences ...) Now, where was I ? ... Oh yes, Cresswell Lane. We arrived there, fair ‘puckered oot’ (knackered) from our walk-about and were totally gob-smacked (quite taken aback) to find that in the place of our wee cafe there was now a brand new ‘coffe
      e hoose’ by the name of “Beanscene”. (it might be ‘emporium’ anywhere else, but remember, this is Glasgow we’re in) “Nothing ventured ...” as they say, we waltzed in and I ordered up two coffees and one of their blueberry muffins. As I explained to the very nice young man behind the counter, “Blueberry muffins are vitally important when attempting to judge the standards of a new establishment such as these”. He smiled and agreed, saying that he believed their Blueberry muffins were some of the best in the business. (Right away, I took a mental note to come back to this place, as it was obvious they were quite used to dealing with middle-aged nutters, ... and to me that is always a good sign) I found that I had inadvertently stumbled on the ‘correct procedure’ for ordering your coffee in Beanscene. On arrival you go to the counter, order you coffee, select from the excellent range of tapas, tasty bites, and general tempting foods on display, and take your tray to your table, with a little ‘place-marker’ to put on your table so that all the people know you’re not as skint as you look and that you’re waiting for you food order .. Seriously, this is the first time I’ve come across this particular method of service and I must say, I like it just fine. Jonathan, the very nice young man who’d taken my/our order delivered two large, steaming mugs of coffee to out table with a cheery smile and a stayed to chat about the quality and variety of the ‘sounds’ to be heard in Beanscene on a daily basis. If Jonathan is an example of the staff this little ‘chain’ has then Beanscene will do well. They appear to have a lot of things ‘just right’. (they have a branch ‘south of the river in Shawlands too) For example, they are open seven days fr
      om eight o’clock in the morning ‘til eleven o’clock at night! Although they do not encourage their clientele to drink per se, every night from 6 p.m., they have a BYOB (bring your own bottle) policy, which is fair and not too pricey at £2 per bottle of wine. If you are ‘bottle-free’ and are looking for an off-sales, worry not, Beanscene have thought of that too! They will happily point you - if you need pointing - in the direction of the nearest Oddbins those excellent wine merchants, with whom Beanscene appear to have a ‘special relationship’ (whoops, slipped in to “Politics essay mode” there, - sorry ) When you consider that they will take you wine (or beer at 50p per bottle)from you and gladly place it in the chiller ‘till you are thirsty enough to consume it, then it’s not a bad deal, not bad at all. Beanscene is promoted as a “coffee and music house” and lives up to its name by having excellent sounds playing at all times. When we were in it was U2 that were playing but if you, like me, are a child of the sixties, then you can listen to Carole King’s Tapestry for example. What is especially interesting is that all the ‘sounds’ you hear in Beanscene are for sale at the counter and at the amazing price of £5:00. (auldmac found the U2 a little raucous for his tastes, but then he’s a professional ‘chilled out’ type of person at heart) On a Tuesdays and a Thursdays there’s a live acoustic set and you can have your coffee cup topped-up * all night * - or as the good folks at Beanscene put it, “Free coffee upgrades all night long.” (yes, folks that big mug is a coffee ‘cup’ in Beanscene) The decor in Beanscene is excellent, except for one small - teency-weency problem ... When we were in there was a young man using a Lap-top computer -as one does these days - he looked totally
      as ease and at home in his surroundings ... it’s just that .... if I were to take my lap-top along - as one does -then I would find the tables to be a teency-weency bit too high .... As I said, its a little complaint, but a valid one I feel. In addition to the man with the lap top there were people reading broadsheets (newspapers) -(it’s near the University, don’t you know) and one or two happily browsing through paperback books. - Oh, did I say that Beanescene also sell books from behind the counter? (* that’s behind the counter, auldmac, not under it *- it’s not that kind of shop!) I loved the place and found it to have an comfortable and welcoming atmosphere which is something sadly missing in the plethora of ‘coffee houses’ springing up simply everywhere. The tables and chairs are arranged in a way that potentialises the number of customers while also providing a feeling of ‘familiarity’, - you just feel ‘at home’ from the moment you walk in the door - a difficult combination to pull of if you ask me. The ‘regulars’ appear to be a very friendly lot - so much so - I might just check out their night-time menu - after all Sunday night, they say they have got “Chet and Miles and Lou and friends” ... no Pauline girl, - that would be expecting too much ... I’m sorry to say ... Go and enjoy, - and tell Jonathan where you read this- dooyoo needs you, remember. GG Oh, by the way, Beanscene has an Internet site too, and I’m just away to check it out ... here’s its URL if you want to go there too; www.beanscene.co.uk

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