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McIllhenny Co. Tabasco Pepper Sauce

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7 Reviews

Type: Sauces

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    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    7 Reviews
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      10.08.2012 23:10
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      A delicious pepper sauce, highly recommended

      I like to have a large collection of sauces on my kitchen shelf, because I know how a plain, boring meal (but often the most healthy option) can be turned into something spectacular with the help of the right sauces. Tabasco Sauce is one of my all time favourite sauces, and, rather ironically, it is also one that makes me feel like I am about to die when I splash it a little too enthusiastically over my food. I am the type of person who loves all things spicy and that contain chilli, but also the type of person who can't handle it! After eating Tabasco with my food, I am often seen running out of the room with streaming eyes.

      I had not even heard of the brand name 'Tabasco' until I was offered some in a local restaurant, and, rather recklessly mistaking it for some weakly spicy sauce, poured about half the tiny bottle (OK, maybe that is a little bit of an exaggeration) all over my food. However, despite how devastatingly spicy Tabasco can be when consumed in large amounts, there is no denying that it is a simply delicious hot pepper sauce and it is all that is needed to spice up any meal. The day after I first tried Tabasco, I went out to the supermarket to get a bottle of my own, as I had obviously been missing out on something huge for a large number of years.

      Tabasco is not a cheap sauce. A tiny 57ml (really not a lot) bottle of Tabasco will set you back £1.49 should you choose to buy the sauce from Tesco. This might seem an awfully large amount to pay for such a small amount of sauce, but the way I look at is that you only need a few small droplets of Tabasco to give your food the kick it needs, so really, it could actually be considered as good value when it is compared to those relatively cheap sauces that you need a lot of just to get a little flavour. Altogether, I think that Tabasco is worth the price you have to pay for it since one small bottle lasts me for quite a long time and it is, after all, a really good quality pepper sauce.

      Tabasco is packaged inside a small glass bottle, with a rather classic design to it with nothing too complicated or flashy on it at all. It also comes in a cardboard box which holds it initially, though I have seen that some retailers do not include this. The mouth opening is very small; at first I was confused at how little came out at the start wondering if something was wrong.

      The taste is delicious; quite salty and very peppery. It has a deep, seasoned taste, which I love and it is bursting with flavour. Plain foods or even foods that I have decided an completely inedible can be fixed with a quick dash of Tabasco Sauce. It is also very hot in amounts larger than a few drops, so I would only put a tiny drop on to start off with, to see how you react to the spiciness of the sauce. If you find it OK, feel free to add as much as you desire.

      Altogether, Tabasco is one of my favourite sauces and I will be buying a lot more of it in the future. Because of Tabasco, I no longer have to cook fancy food for ultimate enjoyment, since this does a better job than I ever could. I would give this 5 out of 5 dooyoo stars.

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        28.05.2010 19:30
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        Beautiful (if a little too mild) hot sauce

        On the whole I am not a saucy person ; ) I dislike ketchup, I'm not an HP or brown sauce fan but within the sauce world I only have eyes for one and that is the hot sauce.

        Within this sub group of sauce there is one that has remained near the top since it was invented in 1868 by a fine southern Gen'leman by the name of Edmund Mcillhenny. Apparently he used old cologne bottles to supply his close friends and family with his original hot sauce until public demand forced him to go large scale.

        Tabasco uses Tabasco chillies along with vinegar, salt and a handful of other ingredients. Along with the original flavour there are a variety of other sauces including chipotle sauce (I believe using smoked chili's though I've never had this particular sauce) green jalapeno (I have had this, it's good but not the best one) garlic (not had this one but I'd imagine it'd be gooooood) and my absolute favourite the habanero variety. Habaneros as a family as you may or may not know are amongst the hottest chili's there are, this is one aspect that makes this particular variety an essential for all chili heads. Something else that makes this my favourite variety within my favourite brand of favourite sauce is that mashed papaya as well as other tropical ingredients are used to make the sauce fruity and delicious. All of the varieties are aged in oak barrels which gives a wonderfully complex and full flavour.

        The bottles come with a special neck that restricts the sauce and stops it shooting out too rapidly, while this is probably a good thing I usually apply about half a bottle to my award winning (hehe) Spicy Noodle Suprise, it takes frigging ages to get half a bottle out of the super thin nozzle.

        As far as sauces go the original tabasco is amongst the milder varieties and while the habanero variety is pleasantly hot there are much hotter sauces out there, the thing is, it's rare in the hot sauce world to find one that doesn't sacrifice flavour for heat. For Example I have a 100% pain sauce that is undoubtedly hot but tastes really strange and far too vinegary. That's why tabasco is still amongst my favourite sauces nice heat but not at the expense of flavour.

        If anyone has any tips on good hot sauce please feel free to post a message : )

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        09.03.2010 12:59
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        A store cupboard essential!

        I blame two of my uni friends for getting me into Tabasco sauce - whenever we used to go to Pizza Hut they always asked for a bottle to add a few drops to the pizza - I tried it and now I'm hooked!

        Tabasco is a spicy pepper sauce designed to pep up savoury dishes. The bottle is not hard to spot on the shelf, being bright orange with a picture of the bottle on the front. One side provides an example of a Tabasco recipe, along with pictures of the 'Tabasco family' of sauces - unfortunately the pictures are so small I have no idea what these other sauces are!

        The ingredients are also listed - white distilled vinegar, red pepper, and salt. That's it. I have no idea how they make it hot! The other side bears a message from Mr Broussard, the 'offical historian of Tabasco' (!) who says: "Tabasco is made from selected peppers, grown and cared for by the McIlhenny family of Avery Island, Louisiana, for over 100 years". There is also a website: www.tabasco.com. The back of the pack says that Tabasco is "aged for 3 years in oak barrels to develop its unique aroma and flavour". Ah, perhaps that's how they make it hot!

        Inside the box is a thin glass bottle bearing the Tabasco label. Inside is the red Tabasco sauce. Luckily the bottle is made of clear glass, meaning it's easy to see when you are about to run out and need to buy another bottle! Unscrewing the red lid (which is rather difficult the first time, because of the plastic seal), you are greeted by the spicy, peppery, piquant aroma of the Tabasco sauce with undertones of vinegar, which tickles your nostrils. The neck of the bottle is quite small, so it is possible to control how many drops of Tabasco come out quite easily - this is great if you're not as obsessed with the stuff as I am, and only want a couple of drops! A little of this sauce goes a long way, and a couple of drops is all you need for a spicy peppery tang. What I really like about this sauce is that, although it's spicy, it isn't so spicy that you can't taste it - it has a unique peppery flavour.

        As mentioned, Tabasco sauce is designed to add spice to savoury dishes. So what do I use it on?

        - Pizza
        - Pasta
        - Cauliflower cheese (yes, cauliflower cheese!)
        - Baked beans
        - Risotto (!)

        I don't tend to use it on chips or veggie sausages, as I prefer brown sauce with those foods, and I don't put it on salads either as I prefer olive oil and balsamic vinegar. However as you can see it is a very versatile sauce!

        Other suggestions (from the packet) include:

        - Flavouring Bloody Mary (or any other cocktail)
        - Casseroles
        - Soups
        - There is a recipe on the box for Tabasco-fortified spaghetti bolognaise.

        A bottle of this sauce costs £1.49 from Tesco. I get through around a bottle a month so I think this is good value. My bottle, bought very recently, has a use-by date of 2014 - handy to know if you only use it very, very rarely!

        Have I convinced you to try it yet? If not, ask for a bottle next time you're in Pizza Hut and try a few drops on your pizza. You'll be hooked!

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          14.10.2009 23:29
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          The original and greatest spicy sauce - treat with love and care and be rewarded!

          I don't really remember when it was that I discovered the heat of Tabasco Sauce. I've always been a fan of spicy foods, and even though I'm getting to a point in my life where I should probably start thinking about 'cooling down' my dishes, I can't help but be addicted to this delicious red sauce!

          Now, don't let the name fool you. Tabasco is more of a juice, or an oil, than a sauce, being more watery in consistency than creamy. It comes in a tiny bottle, standing at around 4 or 5 inches high, with a slender neck and a tiny hole at the end to facilitate getting drops of the sauce, instead of full on splashes - which is a good thing, considering the heat!

          The original red Tabasco Sauce was invented over 140 years ago in the United States, and is still manufactured today with the same traditional methods as it was back then. Only the most perfect tabasco peppers are hand picked, then crushed up to form a mash, that is stored in oak barrels for several years to mature. After this, the juice is extracted and combined with vinegar to create the sauce we know and love.

          I'm not sure if this is true or not, but apparently, the mash is so corrosive that the the forklifts that move it around have to be replaced every six months! Ouch! Before you think this will obviously be bad for you, it is worth remembering that spicy peppers are extremely good for your digestive system in moderation.

          The sauce is a great ingredient for jazzing up food. A particular favourite of mine, is to add it to spaghetti bolognaise - tastes a treat! I also like to use it to spice up bland couscous, and to add a little kick to instant noodles.

          Apparently, you can add it to vodka and tomato juice to make a popular drink called a Bloody Mary. As much as I love vodka, and tabasco as separate entities, the idea of drinking tomato juice makes me feel queasy!

          There are now a few more varieties of the sauce available, in different strengths, such as the milder green Tobasco Sauce, made from jalapeno peppers, or garlic and tobasco sauce. I've not tried these ones yet, but am sure I will in the future!

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            25.05.2004 20:33
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            As a fully certified chef there are a few ingredients in my kitchen that I simply could not do without, and top of the list has to be Tabasco sauce. This innocuous looking little bottle of red sauce has the power to change the flavour of any food with just a couple of drops; it also has the power to have you reaching for the cold water if overused. It can be used in a variety of dishes from soups and stews through to stir fries and pasta dishes, with drinks like a Bloody Mary relying on its fiery flavour to make it taste complete. History Tabasco Pepper sauce is made in America by McIlhenny Co. to the same unique recipe for over 130 years. Red peppers are selected when they reach an exact shade of red; this is decided by holding up a wooden dowel known as the le petit bâton rouge that is painted the preferred shade of Tabasco red. The picked peppers are blended with Avery Island salt and placed into white oak barrels to mature for three years, the resultant fiery sauce is then sieved and blended with vinegar and bottled and shipped to over 105 countries around the world. The name Tabasco is a Central American Indian word that means "land where the soil is hot and humid? and was the second choice name for the sauce after Petite Anse sauce, I think on balance the name Tabasco has a better ring to it. Packaging & Availability Tabasco comes in a tiny bottle holding just 57ml of the fiery sauce. Little decoration is present with a small label and a green band around the neck the only marking. The bottle is packaged in an oblong box to protect it from damage with the box supplying the main information and statistics of the product. No nutritional information is present but with only three ingredients and the fact that the sauce is used in very small quantities the calorific value will be virtua
            lly non existent. Other details on the box includes a recipe for bolognaise and the obligatory contact address should the product fail to satisfy in any way. Finally, it is worth mentioning that Tabasco has a very long shelf life with the bottle I have displaying a best before date of 2009. Tabasco is available in most supermarkets and grocers shops with a bottle costing anything from £1.30 to £1.50. Although the 57ml bottle is sufficient for home use I would like to see Tabasco made available in larger quantities for the catering trade, as a chef I have to use the same 57ml bottle which can be time consuming when making large quantities of food that require the spicy sauce. From information I have gleaned on www.tabasco.com Tabasco is available in a one gallon jug in America, making this size available in the UK would be a real boon for caterers. Heat But just how hot is Tabasco sauce? Well, in such matters a gauge known as the Scoville unit rating is used, this determines just how hot peppers and pepper sauces are and is named after its founder, Wilbur Scoville. The amount of capsaicin in the veins of the peppers is measured to provide the result. Although subject to fluctuations due to different pepper crops Tabasco has a Scoville unit rating of 2500 to 5000 while the hottest peppers of all, the Habanero or Scotch Bonnet, has 350,000. At the other end of the scale the milder peppers like pimento and Bell have a mere Scoville unit rating of 250. My Personal Opinion Well, I think Tabasco sauce is a great product and I would not be without it either in my kitchen at work or at home. Unlike cooking with dry spices like chilli powder the sauce does not need cooking out at all to develop its flavour. I use it mostly in meat dishes like chilli con carne and chicken faji
            tas, and I find that the flavour it gives is a lot fuller and offers far more depth than traditional dry spices. It also adds a new dimension to stir fries or soup when used sparingly, just enough to enrich the food without overshadowing other more subtle flavours. In general I add Tabasco to recipes near the end of the cooking process so as not to cook the sauce too much, although I cannot see any real problem with adding it earlier if so desired. Tabasco is a fine product with a fiery punch belying its small and innocent looking bottle, I give it four stars out of five with the fifth removed because of the small bottle size when used commercially.

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              07.08.2002 02:46
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              Tabasco pepper sauce is something that our family has been using ever since I was a child. I still remember it very vividly when I was a child because whenever I used to swear my mother used to stick a drop or two in my mouth. Believe you this certainly did the trick back then and made certain that my liking for this world renowned pepper sauce only surfaced when I approached by late teens. Tabasco Pepper Sauce is something that is always on our table no matter what we eat. It is one of the most adaptable sauces that I have ever seen and adds zip and zest to just about everything eatable, other than sweet dishes off course. Tabasco is produced by the McIlhenny Company, which was founded in 1868 at Avery Island, Louisiana, U.S.A. Infact this same very site is still in operation today and provides the peppers that are required to produce this excellent pepper sauce. The red peppers that are used in Tabasco originated in Central America. They were first planted on Avery Island over 130 years ago. These peppers are only picked when they have fully ripened and turned into the perfect shade of red. The normal ripening/colour cycle for peppers is first green, yellow, orange and finally a bright red. These peppers are than mashed and mixed with a small amount of salt and then placed in white oak barrels where they will be fermented for up to three years. When ready the aged mash is then blended with vinegar and after sustained stirrings the pepper skins and seeds are strained out after about four weeks. It is then ready to be bottled and shipped out to the world. Tabasco Sauce is current exported to more than 105 countries worldwide and it is something that is available almost anywhere you go. I have tasted many pepper sauces throughout my life and I must admit that I have never ever found anything that comes close to Tabasco. This certainly has something to do with the age-old recipe, the quality of pe
              ppers, the other ingredients and the aging process that is used by the makers. The sauce has so much character and adds flavour to almost everything that it is applied to. It is also one of the most fiery of sauces and usually a couple of drops is enough to liven up an otherwise dull dish. I must admit that I have grown very accustomed to peppers and today most of my food, especially that which is prepared at home, contains pepper in some form or another. Wether it’s the red pepper powder or our own concoction of mashed peppers in vinegar or fresh peppers or Tabasco, pepper forms an integral part of our diet. Different foods require different methods of pepper. Tabasco is very versatile but cannot go with everything. For example if we were making a chicken curry we would rather use fresh chopped green peppers. If we were having a roast chicken we would use our own mashed pepper. However for a majority of foods Tabasco is ideal. Tabasco goes wonderfully well with soups, pasta dishes, omelets and gravy foods like casseroles. It’s also great on potatoes especially jacket potatoes. Another great way of experiencing Tabasco is with Tomato juice. Wether it’s a “Bloody Mary” or just plain tomato juice it still tastes excellent and adds a lovely zest and zip to the drink. Adding a bit of lime and salt adds to the taste. I am sure that many of you have used or use Tabasco Sauce and you all must have had your own experiences. What I am quite certain about is that those experiences must have been mostly satisfying ones. Tabasco is easily available at most supermarkets and shops. It is packed in transparent glass bottles that allow you to see the lovely blood red pepper sauce. The standard bottle size is 57ml and they are presently sold at Tesco’s for £1.21 a bottle. Considering the quality involved the price is not at all bad. A bottle could last the average consumer quite a co
              nsiderable length of time since usually only a few drops are required. Further the nozzle is made in such a way that the sauce comes out in drops and not in a continuous flow. That is surely a good thing considering the potent nature of the contents. Overall Tabasco is the ideal pepper sauce to accompany most foods and to put it bluntly nothing comes remotely close. So add a bit of life to your diet and experience the pleasures of Tabasco. **WARNING – MAKE SURE YOU HAVE A GLASS OF WATER AT ARMS REACH - LOL**

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                06.08.2002 23:33
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                This is tragic tale of how an innocent young man can be corrupted in to a life of wanton taste bud stimulation leading to an obsessive addiction! It all began on a hot summer evening. I was wandering back to my house after an evening spent with friends at one of the many local hostelries, alcohol had been consumed by all! On our way home we took a wrong turn, whether this was due to the effects of the toxic substance in our bloodstream affectng our sense of direction or whether it was purely fate I will never know but on that night we found ourselves going past a late night eatery, a kebab shop to be precise. Now let me explain I was not a complete innocent I had eaten Kebabs before but infrequently and I had always known my limits, on previous occasions whenever the unshaven, shifty eyed Kebab pusher had asked me 'You want Chilli sauce?' I had always had the mental composure to politely refuse, but this time in a moment of weakness I acquiesced. I can still remember the moment when I bit into the fatty slightly burnt meat covered in a innocuous red sauce, after a couple of seconds delay my mouth began to burn my nose seem to enlarge to try an cope with the increasing inflammation of its lining, tears began to stream from my cheeks. This was a wake up call for my taste buds and amongst the obvious overwhelming pain there lurked a hint of pleasure. This proved to be my downfall! It was weeks before I tried again this time the effect wasn't as strong, (it's never is as good as the first time!). I began to be a social chilli sauce user, only when I went out and in the company of friends, I wasn't worried about my increasing dependence on it to get a 'taste hit'… I could handle it! And anyway I hadn't found a source outside of kebab shops and Mexican restaurants. This was the case until one day on a mid week shopping trip to a local supermarket, you know the kind I mean, an emergency shop to buy som
                e items which invariably run out mid week, milk, booze, bread, booze, toilet paper, booze… Well on my way to the bread isle I cut across the exotic food section, out of the corner of my eye I caught site of a little cardboard box showing the picture of a small glass bottle containing a bright red liquid. I'm not sure what made me notice this product amongst all the other rows of Indian, Mexican and and Chinese delicacies but (maybe fate again) I did. I approached the shelf slowly with deliberate steps looking over my shoulder to see if anyone had noticed my interest. I read the label 'TABASCO pepper sauce'. Could be this really be a hot sauce I could use at home! Without thinking of the consequences I bought it. Later that evening as I sat down to eat a plate of pasta with plain tomato sauce, just before taking my first mouthful I remembered the small bottle of Tabasco I had bought, carefully removing the small plastic red lid I sprinkled the precious red liquid over my Tagliatelle. The tongue is the first to experience a slight burning sensation then a slight peppery taste is followed by a increasing amount of heat spreading from your tongue to your palate and then the back of your throat. This was subtly different from the usual hot Chilli sauces. The most insidious aspect of this sauce is that unlike the hot and spicy hit you experience with Asian Cuisine this sensation is not long lasting and thus you are encouraged to have more. The explosion of flavour on eating the pasta was wonderful, it added spiciness to the tomato sauce with perfectly complemented its sweetness, I knew then I was hooked but I didn't care. Since then my consumption has increase steadily nothing can escape the dreaded Tabasco sauce even cheese on toast is not Tabasco free any more! Can I give up? Sometimes I lie to myself and think that I could If I wanted but I know that this would condemn me to a life without taste, so corrupted have my taste buds
                become…It might be too late for me but take my warning seriously use this product wisely and never under the effects of alcohol! PRODUCT DETAILS Ingredients: Vinegar, Red Pepper and Salt Nutritional info (in 5mls of sauce) Calories 0 Fat 0g Sodium 30mg (1% RDA) Carbohydrate 0g Protein 0g Vitamin A (4% RDA) Tabasco sauce is made by the McIlhenny Company based on Avery Island situated in Louisiana USA. It is sold in a small glass bottle holding 57ml. The bottle is contained in a small cardboard box with an exact illustration of the product on the front and useful information about the product on its sides and back. Unlike most cardboard packaging in this case it is not superfluous since it keeps the sauce in a dark environment, which protects it from sunlight. McIlhenny have been making this sauce for over 130years since the particular variety of red pepper used in the production process was first imported from Central America and planted on the island in the early 1870's by Edmund McIlhenny. The small red peppers are still chosen and picked by hand today as soon as they have ripened to a deep blood red colour. After they are picked the peppers are mashed up with salt and placed in oak barrels to age and ferment for a period of three years. After this period they are added to natural high grain vinegar. The pepper skins and seed are strained out and the remaining sauce is bottled and packaged, ready for distribution to worldwide destinations. The contents of the bottle may separate in storage, this is because the sauce has no artificial binding agents added to it, to ensure a consistent taste shake the bottle a few times before adding the sauce to your food. You may also notice a darkening of the sauce over time this again is due to the light sensitive pigments in the peppers that will react to light, in the absence of any added colourings to the sa
                uce a deeper colour will be seen over time. The taste of the sauce will not be affected by this reaction. The shelf life of the product is about 5 years is stored in a cool, dark, dry place. Always check the best before date on the package. VARIATIONS ON A THEME As well as the original Tabasco sauce a number of other Tabasco sauces are available including: Steak Sauce Caribbean Style Steak Sauce Garlic Basting/Marinating Sauce Pepper Jelly (red and green) Garlic Pepper Sauce Green Pepper Sauce Habanero Pepper Sauce Chipotle Pepper Sauce Soy Sauce **RECIPES** BBQ SPARE RIBS To make the marinade mix together: 120ml. soy sauce 120ml. ketchup 1/4 tsp. pepper 2 tbsp. Tabasco sauce Place the spare ribs in the marinade making sure they are completely covered and leave for about half an hour. Place on hot BBQ until meat is browned and tender. SPICY MASHED POTATOES IN PEPPERS (serves 6) Ingredients: 6lb or 3kg of baking potatoes 8 large peppers 1 medium onion Grated Cheddar (or any other semi-hard cheese) 1tsp olive oil Tabasco Sauce Make the mashed potatoes (using 6lb or 3kg) in the usual way although leave them quite thick. Coarsely chop the onion, two of the peppers and sauté them in a little olive oil and butter until they soften. Sprinkle in the Tabasco sauce (to taste), season and stir. Add the peppers to the mashed potatoes mixing it all up. Clean and slice in half the remaining green, red or yellow peppers and then fill them with the mixture. Place the stuffed peppers on a greased baking tray and drizzle with olive oil. Cook in a pre-heated oven (200C) for 15 minutes, then top with grated cheese and continue baking until the cheese bubbles. Serve as main veggie course or as an accompaniment to a meat or fish main course. TABASCO CHIC
                KEN (Serves 4) Ingredients: 4 Boneless/Skinless Chicken Breasts 1 tablespoon of Lemon Juice Tabasco Sauce 4 Garlic Cloves 1 Small Onion Basil Tarragon Sliced Almonds Pre-heat oven to 200C Prepare the chicken by lightly pricking the chicken all over with a fork. Place the breasts in a baking tray and pour the lemon juice over the top. Sprinkle with Tabasco sauce (to taste). Finley chop the garlic cloves and add evenly over the chicken. Coarsely chop the herbs and do the same. Season with salt. Chop the onion and sprinkle over the top. Bake in the pre-heated oven for 15 minutes then spread the sliced almonds over the top and bake for a further 15 minutes or until the chicken is tender. Serve with oven roasted Mediterranean vegetables. Thanks for reading and rating this opinion. © Mauri 2002

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              • Product Details

                Hot and spicy red pepper sauce, ideal for spicying up most savoury dishes