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14 Reviews

Animals Health/Service Type: Dog

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      07.03.2011 12:58
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      Brilliant, they truely care about the animals welfare

      A few years ago (when it was the NCDL) I adpoted a little Staffordshire Bull Terrier from the Dogs Trust in Kenilworth, it was the best thing I have ever done.

      When we picked our dog, we had to go to an evening class just to ensure that we knew what we were letting ourselves in for, they then came and did a quick assessment of our house, just to check fences were high enough and that we had suitable accomadation to keep a dog. We passed all of the assessments.

      Our dog was about 6 when we got her so they said that she can be left on her own while we were at work (which is something the RSPCA doesn't allow!). When we got her she had been trained, neutered, micro chipped and vacinations / worming was up to date. All of this and she only cost us £60.

      Once we got her home and she had settled in it turned out that she had a lot of medical problems, including allergies - which meant an injection once a month that would have cost us £350, it wasn't covered on insurance as it was classed as a pre existing condition, it was also a life long condition. We would not have been able to afford this so we called the Dogs Trust to see if they had any advice. They suggested that instead of an adoption they change it to a fostering scheme which meant that they would pay for any ongoing treatment that was present when she was in the dogs home.

      This was a weight off our backs, we loved the dog so much but wouldn't have been about to afford £350 per month for her jab, that is why I would recommend the Dogs Trust to anyone. They are realistic in the fact that they know that people work and dogs are going to be left during the day, there are very few people who will spend all day and night with the dog, or be able to take them to work. Also they bent over backwards to sort out the medical treatment that she received and as they knew that we were good owners and would not want to change her or return her to the home they went out of their way to make it possible for us.

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      12.02.2011 00:17
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      10/10

      I personally work with dogs and anyone working in rescue etc. would agree that we all have a lot to thank the Dog's Trust for. They have helped to rehome so many dogs and have prevented the birth of undoubtedly a huge number of unwanted puppies with their subsidised neutering scheme. they have also done wonders to increase awareness of abandoned dogs and unwanted puppies with their publicity campaigns. they also directly help dogs by taking in dogs from pounds etc who would otherwise be in danger of being put down.

      they do their best to assess all dogs that they rehome to make sure they are as described and to match the right dog with the right family so everything goes well and the dog will have a home for life, rather than having to be brought back due to something not working out.

      The staff are all very friendly to talk to and obviously love dogs as they take such good care of all the dogs and so many dogs have a second chance at life because of Dogs Trust.

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        05.05.2010 12:51
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        see above

        I have been brought up with dogs of all types throughout my life , and so can be called a doggie person , however , I am against cruelty to all animals and am glad I dont work for the animal charities as I would be unable to keep my temper seeing some of the abuse pets have to suffer .


        Dogs trust used to be called the NCDL ( National Canine Defence Leauge) , and look after abandoned dogs all-over the country , they will never turn a dog down nor will they euthanize a dog, unless of course their condition medically is such that it is in the best interest of the animal , there are two dogs trust re homing centers in Scotland which unfortunately nearly always full

        It is hard not to have your heart strings pulled when you enter the centre and see faces which require loving and some care and a good , home

        I have had 3 dogs from the re homing centre in West Calder , Gyp who lived to the grand old age of 15 and died of cancer , Rocky who lived to 7 and unfortunately had severe arthritis and was better to be put out of his misery and more recently pepper she is 4 and lives at my mums with our other dog bryn

        Whenever you go into the re homing centers you will be made feel welcome , and it is no hassle to just go and have a look around the staff will show you or let you walk round your self , if you go though please take a toy or some bones or even just a cheap tin of dog food , as they receive no government funding and depend on donations so every bit helps !

        If you wish to re home a dog the staff will tell you about the dogs available at the centre , get you to fill in a form with your details and arrange a home visit , this is really nothing to worry about , its to make sure that if your picking a big dog you have enough room for it and to talk through any worries or questions you may have

        After the initial visit you normally can take the dog home the next again week , and then spend a life time of enjoyment with your new furry friend

        They will neuter the dog and will also fit a micro chip free of charge and also give the first batch of injections which when you consider that they only charge £75.00 for the dog of your choice is quite a service


        I have seen some really abused dogs in the centers and it makes me wonder what kind of person can abuse a defenseless animal , they all need looking after and if you so wish you can also volunteer to work at the centers this may involve such simple things as taking some of the dogs for a walk

        If you are unable to re home a dog you can also sponsor a dog , which means that you are helping towards its up keep , it may be a older dog which no one wants and will be kept in the centre for as long as required , you will then get 'letters' from your dog and even christmas cards and birthday cards

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          08.01.2010 00:39
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          A dog is for life - not just for Christmas.

          Dogs Trust - give an abandoned pooch a home.

          If you have read my introduction that says a little about me and my family, you will know over the summer we 'adopted' a border collie cross from our local dogs trust centre.

          My daughter (now 7) had been asking for a dog since she was two, but she was deemed to young at that time. She pestered us for months and years, she just never gave in. She even had a name - Bubbles.

          Probably about May time, we felt the time was right, that the children were old enough and responsible enough. We decided July would be the best so we could get it to do it's 'business' outside as the doors would be open (in the heat we didn't get) and access to the garden would be easy while the dog settled in.

          On our first visit we had to fill in a form giving details of our home. Whether we had a garden, how tall was the fence, and how many children we have and their ages. They also needed to know whether we worked and whether the dog would be left for any period of time. Within a few days a re-homer came to assess the garden to see if it was 'dog-proof'.

          The next stage was to choose a dog. This is the hardest thing I have done ever. They are all so cute and you want to take them all. Firstly, you have to choose what size dog you want. A bernese mountain dog is probably not a sensible choice for a little old lady - so you have to be realistic here. Secondly, the all important costs - you have to feed it, take it for injections, boosters, have savings for unexpected illnesses and accidents. You have to factor for all of these when you have a dog, and don't forget insurance. Walkies - These are important too - you have to choose a dog that will fit in with your lifestyle.

          It is impossible to tell at first glance how you will get on so at Dogs Trust you are able to spend time with the dog you have chosen - everyday if need be. You might have taken to the dog but has it taken to you? May advice is go and visit as often as possible, you will build up trust and gain the dogs confidence. After all, who knows what the poor animal has been through? It may have been abandoned or abused or worse still - both.

          For next step of the evaluation, you need a meeting with the rehomers. All people who have had their home check and passed, are then invited to this meeting. It is just a genereral, informal chat about how to settle your dog at home, how to teach it manners, after all the things it's original owner may have let it do (ie. sit on sofa, sleep on bed) may not be suitable in your home. It also gave information on what to do to introduce your new animal to other pets in your home - a hamster may not be that worried, but a cat or another dog might!

          We chose our dog on the fourth attempt. You may be lucky and find the perfect one for you first go but don't be disheartened if it takes longer. Our first choice had bitten a child, so no-go there. Dogs Trust NEVER put a healthy dog down. That dog be suitable for someone who lives on their own with no children visitors. Number two dog, had agoraphobia - No walkies to us was a no-no. We are quite active as like to be outdoors. Number three was too 'vocal' Non stop yapping and barking. Beware they are not all as sweet and innocent as they look.

          Mae, renamed Miley (thank goodness it wasn't Bubbles :0) came home with us after only a week in kennels. We were the first to see her and she was an instant hit with our family. We had to wait a week because she needed to have booster injections and flea treatment etc, because as a stray no-one knew when her last treatment was. We were lucky as she had been spayed, If she hadn't have been, we would have had to wait for that to be done too, as no dog leaves without first having some sort of birth control.

          All treatment is paid for by the Dogs Trust, which is how they come to rely so heavily on donations. The vets fees alone would have come to hundreds of pounds, add to that flea treatment, injections, care and feeding. I wouldn't like to estimate the cost. Miley cost us just £75 and we were even sent home with a collar, lead and a bag of food.

          The one disadvantage with Miley is, she had no history. We knew she came from Ireland (as most Dogs Trust dogs are) but that's it! We do know she was looked after, as previously mentioned, she was spayed. Lucky her. Most DT dogs come from Ireland - due to religious reasons people refuse to give their dogs contraception too and apparently Ireland is overcome with dogs, and they just breed, and breed, and breed.

          Since coming home we have had to alter some unwanted habits, for instance she loved to sit on our brand new leather sofa. I'm sorry to say, she has the run of the house but NOT the sofa. We did have problems at first, she must have lived in the country, as she was terrified of buses, cars, in fact anything that moved. With peserverance, she is able to cope with situations now, she is able to live a normal, carefree doggie life.

          Dogs Trust have been enormously helpful, and they were at the end of the phone when we needed it. I love all animals, and support all animal charities but this one is especially close to my heart.

          In conclusion - would I recommend a Dogs Trust Dog? Of course I would, with all of my being. Why give puppy breeders the opportunity to breed more dogs with problems, in-bred and psycological? Give a Dogs Trust dog a home and you'll have a friend for life.

          If you are not able to give a dog a home, why not think of sponsoring a dog - see website below for further details.

          For more information and advise about adopting a Dogs Tust dog please go to www.dogstrust.org.uk/

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            20.10.2009 16:38
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            Please help today!

            Dogs Trust

            http://www.dogstrust.org.uk

            Founded in 1891, Dogs Trust, formerly known as the NCDL, has always campaigned on dog-welfare related issues to ensure a safe and happy future for dogs. They are the largest dog welfare charity in the UK.

            They say the following;

            The health and happiness of every dog is at the heart of all our efforts and we try to find each and every dog in our care a loving home for life. We never destroy a healthy dog.
            This statement is aimed at all dogs in the UK whether they be in our care, ex-Dogs Trust dogs or dogs that need our help. We have set up several schemes and projects around the country to help us achieve our ultimate aim.

            Along with rehoming, they offer fostering, and invaluable advice and information. They also often offer free neutering schemes in local areas to try and help to reduce the instances of unwanted puppies in the UK.

            We got our dog from the Dogs Trust and have spent many happy years together. There are so many dogs and puppies who desperately need loving homes so if you are planning on a canine companion, please try to rehome one, and consider an adult dog instead of a puppy, they have so much love to give and will devote themselves to you.

            Unfortunately, because they are a charity, they inevitably need your support. Any donation is welcome, or why not sponsor a dog (details on the website) or have a fundraiser? There is so much that you can do to make a difference to the lives of so many animals and however large or small, your contribution will be gratefully received and is guaranteed to make a difference.

            Please be generous - these dogs need your help!

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              19.06.2009 00:21
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              great fun and helps a needy animal

              I had never realy heard of the dogs trust up untill a few months ago when we got a knock at the door, it was a representative from the dogs trust looking for people to sign up to sponsor a dog from them and to donate money to them each month.

              Well being a big animal lover how could i say no, so we agreed to it and signd up, you get to pick a dog from a choice of about 16 dogs to sponsor, i should imagine the money goes to all different dogs but you have to choose your own one, we chose our dog to sponsor and filled in the form.

              The form is quick and simple to do and you need to give all your details including your bank details for a direct debit to be set up.

              After signing up we were left with a leaflet and a bookmark from the dogs trust.

              You get a letter about 10 days later from the dog you have sponsored, not literaly but they write it as if the dog is writing to you and if you want too or have children who want to like my 6 year old does you can write to your dog and he writes back to you, my daughter sends her dog a letter each week then eagerly awaits the post for his reply, she genuinly thinks he realy writes to her.

              The donation is £8 a month out of my bank account and for this i get the pleasure of knowing i have helped a dog in need and seeing the joy it gives to my daughter is even better. You first donation doesnt go out of your account untill 2 months after the sign up date so there is a good cooling off period with this and you can cancel at any time if your circumstances change.

              I would thouroughly recomensd anyone donating to these but especialy if you have a child who would be as excited by this as mine are.

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                18.06.2009 22:18
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                Let me start by telling you a bit of background info about myself. I have never been a dog lover to be honest, this being due to when I was 13 I was doing my daily paper round job and was attacked by a huge Alsatian dog. I was bitten on the leg. I had to go to hospital and I still have the scars eight years later. I am however a keen animal lover.

                I have never owned a dog and therefore not got to know one and trust one. My family however have been considering getting a dog for a couple of years but not found the right time. This January I was diagnosed with depression and severe anxiety and left university for a break, and moved back in with my parents. My doctor put me on meds and told me to make sure I went out for a walk everyday. My confidence wasn't exactly up so I found this quite difficult.

                My parents were discussing getting a dog and once again I piped up how scary they were. However after thinking for a while, I decided that getting to know one and being able to walk it might be fantastic for my confidence, and my parents and I decided that rescuing a dog from a rescue centre would be the best option.

                We went to a local kennels which was run by the council, it really was in a disgusting state and the dogs had no background information with them which wasn't really useful to us when we also have young children in the family in terms of safety.

                We then went to the Dogs Trust Centre in Leeds. The foyer was large and clean, with plenty of seats for people to wait, there was a huge tub of 'doggie treats' you could take for free, and there were lots of photographs around telling you about the dogs that they had. We filled in a form telling the staff who was in our family, why we wanted a dog, and about our working hours (my parents work from home and we have a nice big garden so we fitted the bill well)

                Through another door you are able to go and look at the dogs. All of them had clean indoor kennels with food, toys, beds and even armchairs. They had a walkway where you could see through the glass. The dogs had the freedom to run around and socialise with other dogs by leaving their kennel and going into a secure area. All of the dogs had a poster up letting people know what the dog was like, where he/she had come from, the age etc.

                We did not see the 'strays' section as the Dogs Trust will not allow families with children to take home dogs from there, again for safety reasons.

                We told the friendly staff what we would like: a medium sized dog, under five years of age, good with children, travels well and is fairly sociable, we didn't have a preference on the sex or breed.

                We were shown Betsy, a lovely 3 1/2 year old 'mix of everything' dog. She had previously been with a family that had just had their 5th child, clearly 5 children and a dog was just too much to cope with! We were then allowed to take her into 'the training room' which had toys in and were allowed to interact with her for an hour to see how she got on with us. This was great and we decided we would love to adopt her.

                During the next few days we visited Betsy twice, it is a requirement from the Dogs Trust to visit three times within a week to make sure the dog and you are right for each other. On both occasions we got to walk her around a huge field outside. All the staff were extremely friendly and remembered us each time we visited. They were all very professional and seemed like complete animal lovers (which is great, obviously!). They also came to do a 'home visit' to check our house was suitable and our garden was secure enough to home her. This lasted about ten minutes.

                On the 'adoption day', we went to pick her up and were given a pre-adoption talk for about half an hour. They went through everything we needed to know about owning a dog and how to settle her in. We also recieved a goodie bag with dog food in, a collar and a lead (both Dogs Trust Branded), and some information leaflets.

                Then the exciting bit! We could take her home. We paid the re-homing fee which was 75 pounds. This included: neutering her, microchipping her with our details, a full vet's health check, with all her vaccinations up to date and the goodiebag with the first basics we needed.

                We took her home and she was an absolute gem. She has fitted into the family perfectly and we can't believe we have only had her for four months! She has given us all a new lease of life being able to walk her in the countryside nearby, and is a loyal and friendly companion :) The Dogs Trust also rang us twice during the week after we took her home to check everything was fine with her, if there had been any unusual behavior they would have put us through to their specialist to give us some advice.

                The Dogs Trust really is a fantastic place to get a dog from. They are friendly, professional and re-assuring. They make sure that dogs go to the right families, they fantastic facilities for the dogs and for people visiting. I cannot recommend them enough.

                However it is worth remembering their slogan 'A Dog is for life, not just for Christmas'. Make sure you have the time, money and energy, owning a dog is a huge commitment, though for us it has been so very rewarding :)

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                  10.03.2009 13:00
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                  Recommended as a gift for a loved one.

                  INTRODUCTION

                  As many of you know I am pet mad, currently two rather large dogs, a very old cat, fish and a hamster. If there is any animal that I can help I try my best to do so, but in my current situation it is not possible to re-home of take care of anymore pets.

                  I would have a house full if I could, but I feel that I would be minus a husband if it took anything else in. Don't get me wrong he loves our pets but hates the hair that gets everywhere.

                  Anyway as I no longer have the space of time to have anymore pets, I have now started to sponsor dogs, via the dogs trust. This way I am still helping but not having the commitment of looking after them.

                  THE DOGS TRUST

                  The dogs trust is the UK's biggest dog welfare charity that prides itself on re-homing and caring for stray, sick or ill treated dogs. The dogs trust gives these dogs a sense of being and care for them until they are re-homed of pass on, but the thing I love about the charity is the fact that they will never destroy a healthy dog, they will care for it for the rest of the dog's days.

                  The dog's trust currently has seventeen re-homing shelters across the country and they look after 15,000 dogs at any one time, they have no government funding so they trust is reliant on donations for the re-homing and sponsorship process.

                  Many of the dogs taken in by the trust are eventually re-homed but there are many dogs that just can't settle in a new home or can't be re-homed due to certain circumstances as they are set in there ways and new owners can't handle them, so these are what the trust call sticky dogs and these are the ones that you will be helping when you set up a sponsorship.

                  SPONSOR A DOG

                  All of the dogs that are up for the sponsorship program are sticky dogs that cannot be re-homed but are in perfect health, as the dog trust do not destroy dogs they need help to take care for them.

                  All of the dogs have had difficult pasts resulting in them being aggressive, timid and very disobedient so they cannot find a new home easily, by sponsoring these dogs you are giving them a second chance and your monthly subscription will help pay for food, vet bills and other costs that are vital to the dogs well being.

                  You can sponsor a dog for as little as £1.00 a week and this will help save one of these dogs, so for me £4.00 is such as small amount that will make a huge difference to these dogs.

                  WHAT YOU GET FROM IT

                  If you do sponsor a dog you get great pleasure as you receive regular updates on how your dog is coping, you usually get an up date on the dog every four months which isn't a lot but it is great to see how they are doing.

                  The trust have many sponsor ships already in place so you may not be the only person who has sponsored that same dog, which is very understandable as the sponsorship subscription is so cheap.

                  When you sign up for sponsorship of a dog you will receive many keepsakes as well as the regular up dates on how your dog is coping.

                  The things you receive for your very small donation are:

                  A personalized sponsorship certificate that will feature a coloured photograph of your sponsored dog.

                  A wallet sized sponsor card, which also has a picture and the detailed of your dog. I loved this as I could carry it around in my purse and pull it out on many occasions. I have managed to get a few people to sign up for the sponsorship programe, just because of this little card alone.

                  A fridge magnet featuring your dog, I found a magnet a little strange but it looks great on the fridge.

                  Regular updates are sent every four months and you receive a Christmas card, valentine's card and new photographs through out the year.

                  HOW TO SPONSOR A DOG

                  The fastest and easiest way to sponsor a dog is online at www.thedogstrust.co.uk here you can select which dog you want to sponsor and fill out all of your direct debits instructions via the site.

                  The minimum sponsorship price is £1.00 a week but you can donate more if you want to, you can cancel your subscription at any time but for the small price of £4.00 a month I fell it is worth it, when you get your up dates sent through the post there is no better feeling.

                  MY OPINION

                  I currently sponsor three dogs through the dogs trust at Leeds, this was nothing I knew about before adopting Meg so I have taken full advantage as I feel that the trust do an amazing job so I actually like to help even though it is only a small amount.

                  The only thing that really surprised me was the fact that only 98p of your pound goes to the dogs as the other 2p is taken for administration fees, I felt this was pretty poor but they will have bank charges and wages to pay I suppose.

                  You can even sponsor a dog as a gift for someone else, which I think is a great idea and I have asked for a sponsor dog on my next birthday as I think this is an amazing gift.

                  If anyone can spare the £4.00 a month then this is something I would recommend you spending it on, as it helps give these little guys a second chance.

                  I have found the Trust to be very accommodating, not only did we get Meg from them but I now have three sponsor dogs. Every few weeks wee take a drive to the Trust in Leeds and take the dogs for a walk, so I am very lucky as I even get to see my sponsored dogs if my circumstances change I will be sure to re-home these too.

                  If you can't re-home or sponsor a dog you can always pop into your nearest trust and take them out for a walk as they are always looking for volunteers to take the dogs out.

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                    16.11.2006 17:09
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                    Overview of TDT

                    ***Intro***
                    For anyone that doesn’t know then I’ve recently adopted a rescued dog. Yep, it’s currently destroying my house as we speak but it’s what my family wanted so I have to feel warm in the knowledge that my kids will grow up more emotionally stable and that the dog’s misdemeanors will distract my good lady from my own! We’ve always collectively believed in providing a home for rescued animals and have exercised our right to do just that with the three cats we have at the moment. Taking on a dog was a whole new ball game but by going through The Dog’s Trust (TDT) we found the whole thing painless and knew we had the support we needed in the future if anything went wrong.

                    ***The Dog’s Trust***
                    TDT was founded in 1891 and was previously known as the National Canine Defence League (NCDL). Originally established to protect dogs from torture and neglect, the organization remains a big player in the field of rehoming dogs with over 300,000 members and supporters in its modern incarnation. TDT is a registered charity obtaining funding from donations from the public and proclaims itself to be the largest dog welfare charity in the UK. The organization has a comprehensive website at http://www.dogstrust.org.uk which is well worth a look if you are interested in giving a home to a rescued dog. With over 100,000 stray dogs found in the UK in 2005 alone, you can see that it’s a huge task finding homes for all of the canines that find themselves homeless and when you read about the fate of the majority of greyhounds, for instance, then it’s difficult to turn to a pedigree when you know a dog may die as a result of not helping. TDT has 17 centres across the UK including sites in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland as well as England so there should be one within a reasonable travelling distance for most folks.

                    ***My Experience***
                    The site has a 10-step process that gets folks started if you are interested. The initial step is to register on the site with a user name and password (usual details required i.e. name, address etc) and then complete a questionnaire that acts as a sift for both you and TDT. So the kind of questions you will encounter includes things like “Do you have a garden?” “What hours do you work?” “What other pets do you have?” and so on. All of these are factors will influence the kind of dog you end up with.

                    Steps 2 & 3 are talking to the staff about which dog will suit you the most and visiting the viewing kennels. Having filled in the questionnaire then the volunteers at the centre will have an idea of what kind of dog you should be looking for but we were left to our own devices at our first visit, to take in the various dogs on show at the kennels. A word of warning: not all of the dogs are on show as the centre operates a rotation policy to give every dog a chance of finding a new home. We didn’t find a suitable dog at our first attempt and the dogs on the website tend to be the ones that have been difficult to find a home for so may not be representative of the kind of animal you are looking for. You will also find a sift on the description on the front of the glass kennel i.e. this dog is not suitable for families with children; this dog will not mix with cats etc. This can be frustrating but they are there for a reason and you are better off respecting the staff’s judgment in these matters.

                    Steps 4 and 5 include shortlisting which dogs appeal to you and then meeting the selected dogs in a special meeting room. We chose four dogs we thought would suit, although by the time one of the staff came over to attend to us, we had to restrict ourselves to two as the others were being considered by other folks. We needn’t have worried; having met our choice of a 5-month old colley cross-breed, we fell in love with him straight away and couldn’t wait to get him home!

                    Steps 6 and 7 include a home visit and vet’s check. TDT didn’t go through with the home check for us as we lived too far away (the centre is in Kenilworth and we live in Northampton) so we had to take photographs of our garden, clearly showing the height of our fence. We passed this visual inspection although I did worry that, for all they knew, we could be doggy mass murderers planning to mince the pooch and make cheap curry from it. Still, I’m sure they would find this out somehow. Before we could take him home, the dog had to have a full veterinarian check over to make sure it wasn’t harbouring any evil lurgy.

                    Steps 8, 9 and 10 focus on the pre-adoption talk, taking the woofer home and follow up. My good lady had to go to the pre-adoption talk as it was during the week and I couldn’t get the time off work but she says it was useful covering basic stuff like toilet training, general behavioural bits and pieces and looking after your new dog in general. You’ll be told to avoid feeding it chocolate (poisonous, apparently), the right mix of foods and when to feed the dog and other useful stuff. We had to wait around ten days before finally taking our mutt home as he still needed some psychological assessment done to make sure he wasn’t a rabid man eater or anything like that. TDT take subsequent ownership very seriously and we had to sign a contact to say, amongst other things, that we would get the dog neutered by a certain deadline and that, should we find the pooch incompatible with our family for any reason, then ownership must be passed by way of legal assignment to any subsequent owners. I also had to pay £75 for the privilege of owning our new canine. The fee included a new collar and lead, a voucher towards the cost of getting the dog spayed and a chip implant in case he ever got lost so that we could be re-united via the computer database. We were also given free pet insurance with PetPlan for the first six weeks. We’ve decided to stick with PetPlan even though there are alternatives and a tip re pet insurance is to make sure that it’s life time cover and it doesn’t terminate when the dog reaches a certain age. You can bet your bottom dollar that when it reaches that age then that’s when you’ll need the cover the most!

                    ***Advantages/Disadvantages***
                    As with most things, there are advantages and disadvantages. The advantages of using TDT include:

                    Plenty of locations to choose from
                    Comprehensive start up support
                    Good screening process
                    Follow up support
                    Free pet insurance for the first 6 weeks

                    The disadvantages include:

                    Only open from 12pm on Saturdays
                    Don’t always do home checks
                    It’s first come – first serve on Saturdays as most people arrive at midday!
                    Dogs can be high maintenance

                    ***Conclusion***
                    Having previously dealt with organizations like the RSPCA and the Cat’s Protection League, I’ve been pleased with the professionalism of TDT. They’ve been attentive, supportive and generally, very helpful all the way through the process and it’s re-assuring to know that they are there should we need help in the future. As a nation of animal lovers, organisations like this serve to enrich our lives and so do a wonderful job in preventing dogs being destroyed unnecessarily. If you are considering adopting a rescued dog then I would recommend The Dog’s Trust implicitly. Now where's my shoe gone?!

                    Thanks for reading

                    Mara

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                      05.09.2005 22:02

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                      A brief desciption of daily work at the NCDL

                      One summer a few years ago I worked voluntarily at the Sadberge National Canine Defence League and I thought I'd write about what I found went on behind the scenes.

                      Every day the dogs' kennels needed to be washed and cleaned. Each kennel contained at least one dog with two compartments, one outside and one inside. The floor of each compartment was cleared of dog mess, washed and dryed, and each basket washed, every morning. The dogs were fed and then taken for walks. Each dog had its own label on the kennels with information about its personality as a guide for potential owners. Each dog also had toys in the kennel. The dogs had as good a life as was possible in the circumstances. They were looked after and in the countryside.

                      There was also a puppy block where the younger dogs lived. Some of these were tiny and really lovely. These were cared for as above but extra time was taken to play with them.

                      The most important thing about the centre is of course the rehoming, and adoption packs are given out with each dog to help give them the best new start possible.

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                      19.09.2001 11:15
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                      A couple of months ago, my girlfriends dad came home from work, and he started saying how much he wanted a dog to keep him company and he had been told about some place called the NCDL (National Canine Defence League) by a friend. So, the next day he got up and went over to the local centre, which luckily is only about 2 miles away from his house. The next day, whilst visiting the re-housing centre, he told us of how he had fallen in love with a 3 year old Border Collie called “Tom” (which was a strange name, as it is a bitch) and he had actually put his name down to adopt it, then 2 and a half weeks later, the dog was his. So, who exactly are the NCDL? The NCDL are a charity based re-housing centre for unwanted or abandoned and mistreated dogs, they have 16 centres situated in various locations around the country (see the list below for your nearest centre), anyway, as you know, there are all too often cases of dogs not being wanted and abandoned or mistreated, well that’s were the NCDL come in, what they do, is take these dogs in, look after them, check them out health-wise and attempt to find loving homes for these poor unwanted animals (although, as you can imagine, they do receive some dogs that are just not re-house able). But they do claim to have an extraordinary success rate and the have a policy were no matter whether a dog is found a home or not and the dog is healthy, they will not destroy the dog, so that’s where you come in. So you want a dog do you? Are you sure? Well first of all, I must get this message over, are you really sure you want a dog for life? Are you not going to get sick of it after a few months and give it away or even worse abandon the poor thing? If the answer to the last question is yes or I don’t know, well don’t bother, as the dog will only end up in the same situation, as you’ve got to be 100% certain whether you actually want a dog and a dog &#
                      8220;FOR LIFE” that is. So, you are 100% certain you want a dog? That’s good, now take a look at the list below and get along to your local NCDL and choose one or even if you don’t want one, you could always sponsor a dog for a mere £1.00 a week (this helps the NCDL feed and look after the vast amount of unwanted dogs) or you can actually volunteer to become a walker (you have to be over the age of 16 for this), this includes going to the centre on a regular basis and taking the dogs for a walk. To get your dog, its not just a case of going to the centre and walking out with one, Oh no, its not that simple, you see, the NCDL take every caution available to make sure their dogs are re-housed in caring and fit-to-live surroundings, you have to go through a process that can take up to/just over 2 weeks, here is the process: Day 1: You arrive at your local centre and take a good look around, the dogs are kept in very cosy cage/kennel buildings, that each house about 10 lots of dogs (some cages have 2 to 3 dogs in them, some of which have to be re-housed together), you’ll see all kinds of lovely dogs, some cross-breeds and some actually very expensive dogs like Bull-Terriers, Labradors, Old English Sheepdogs, etc, take a real good look around and be certain the dog you want, is the dog you’ll still want in years to come. Once you have seen a dog you like, you go to the information centre, and they’ll tell you about the dog and give you any important information concerning the dog, if you are still interested, you put your name down to reserve the dog (once this has been done, the dog is not available to others, unless you have a change of heart). During the next few days or even a week, you are advised to visit the centre with various members of your family (especially any children that live/visit regular, and take the dog for a walk around the grounds and to generally get used to him/her. D
                      ay 4/5/6 or 7: In these days, whilst you are getting to know the dog (at the centre) you will receive a home visit, this is of course to make sure your home is fit for the dog to live and make sure everyone in the family is happy with the idea. About 3 days later, as long as everything is OK, you are allowed to pick up your dog and take it home for a 2 week trial, this gives you the chance to assess the dog in your home and also guards against you having a change of heart. 2 Weeks later: If all is well, and you are 100% sure you want the dog, you take him/her back to the centre so the dog can have a veterinary surgeon give them a thorough medical, all things being OK, you then go and pay for the dog (in the centre we went to ALL dogs, no matter what breed were £55, I think this applies in all the centres, but I’m not 100% certain) and take him/her home and hopefully enjoy your life with your new-found friend. The dog my girlfriends dad bought was micro-chipped, healthy, and is a bloody nuisance LOL, as she is a 100% attention seeker and with it being a Border Collie, is always seeking fun or walks, but it’s a cracker dog and very, very affectionate and in the 6 weeks they have had it, they and me have totally fallen in love with it. We also re-named her Tammy (as I said, she was originally called Tommy for some reason, so we picked the obvious name to call a bitch that was closest to its name). So, there you have it, the NCDL a charity and volunteer run centre, that not only re-houses unwanted or badly treated dogs, they keep the ones that no-one wants and unless have any serious health problems, keep them at their centres for good, refusing to destroy them. So, where can I find a NCDL? Well, hers a list of address’s and phone numbers to your nearest centres: Ballymena: 60 Teeshan Rd, Ballymena, Co Antrim, (028-2565 2877) Bridgend: Tondu Rd, Bridgend, Mid Glam, (01656-652-771)
                      Canterbury: Radfall Rd, Chestfield, Nr Whitstable, Kent, (01227-792-505) Darlington: Hill House Farm, Sadberge, Co Durham, (01325-333-114) Dumfries: Dovecotwell, By Glencaple, Dumfries, (01387-770-346) Evesham: 89 Pitcher’s Hill, Wickhamford, Worcs, (01386-830-613) Ilfracombe: West Down, Ilfracombe, North Devon, (01271-812-709) Kenilworth: Honiley, Kenilworth, (01926-484-398) Leeds: Eccup Lane, Adel, Leeds, (0113-2613-194) Merseyside: Whiston Lane, Huyton, Liverpool, (0151-480-0660) Newbury: Plumb’s Farm, Hamstead Marshall, Newbury, (01488-658-391) Roden: Roden Lane Farm, Telford, Shropshire, (01952-770-225) Shoreham: Brighton Rd, Shoreham by Sea, W. Sussex, (01273-452-576) Snetterton: North End Rd, Snetterton, Norfolk, (01953-498-377) West Calder: Bentyhead, Hartwood Rd, West Calder, (01506-873-459) Head Office: 17 Wakley Street, London EC1V 7RQ, (020-7837-0006) Or visit their web site at www.ncdl.org.uk to find out more info. So if you are interested in re-housing a dog or just interested in either sponsoring or walking the dogs, you’ll be much appreciated and please, please, if you do take a dog to re-home it, please give it love and care, as some of these dogs have experienced a terrible life of mistreatment and abuse, anyhow, good luck and I hope you find a dog for you.

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                        22.08.2001 15:42
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                        I was inspired to sign up to sponsor a dog through NCDL (National Canine Defence League) by another member - thanks to Wulsie! To be truthful l had often seen the adverts on telly and kept meaning to get around to it but never did, so the opinion gave me the kick up the bum l needed! The TV commercials were not all singing all dancing ones, with loads of money spent on them. Rather, in simple terms dogs putting their plight across. I have never had a dog -although l now have may much adored cat Purdy l would always have said prior to her arrival that l was more of a doggie person. My sister is terrified of dogs - she will hyperventilate and physically throw herself into your arms in one (no matter how small) should come close to her. Apparently something to do with my mum being attacked by an Alstain when she was pregnant with her. Right now l simply do not think it would be fair on a pooch to live with us - we are out all day, our back yard isn’t big enough and we often go away at weekends. So to me NCDL is the answer. BACKGROUND DETAILS It was founded in 1891 to campaign on dog-related issues. Its founding member was a Lady Gertrude Shock and they first met at the first ever Crufts. By 1901 membership was at 1000, 6500 in 1910 and today membership totals 300 000. NCDL's motto is never to destroy a healthy dog - in all cases they will try where possible to find a loving and happy home. HOW TO HELP NCDL At present they have 11 000 dogs requiring their help and they have various ways in which the general public can do so: * THROUGH YOUR PAY PACKET The donation is tax deductible therefore it is taken out before tax is calculated and so your tax bill is smaller. Also until April 2003, the nice taxman will donate 10% on top of your contribution! 3 easy steps 1 Check if you company runs a payroll scheme and if so contact the Corporate and Community Fund
                        raising team who will send you the form to complete and return 2 Decide on the amount you want to give (even a measly pound can make all the difference) 3 Complete and return the form to NCDL For details please contact NCDL 17 Wakely Street London EC1V 7RQ MAKING A DONATION This can be carried out on line, by either credit card or direct debit. Otherwise you can send a cheque to the above address. SPONSORSHIP Again this can be carried on on line. You simply choose a dog or if you are like me and unable to choose opt for the mystery dog option. Fill in a simple form; choose your payment amount and method and wait. NCDL will send you the following: * Certificate featuring your dog's photo and his/her details * A sticker * An enamel badge * Thrice yearly magazine * Other nice surprise (like Valentines day cards!) REHOMING The NCDL obviously want to rehome as many doggies as possible and at any one time have 1 700 dogs in need. Their website gives full details of how to go about adopting a dog. They are widespread throughout the UK - having 16 centres including: Ballymena, NI Dumfries Leeds Merseyside Newbury Canterbury Ilfracombe I now eagerly await the details of my new poochy and cannot wait to hear how they develop. Im usually a believer of charity beginning at home but the NCDL in my eyes at least are a worthy benefactor. CONTACT DETAILS See the address listed earlier in the opinion OR visit the website at http://www.ncdl.co.uk WOOF - Heather

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                          18.08.2001 05:16
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                          As many members know, I am lucky enough to own (along with Shane) a fourteen-year-old dog called Scamp, but others are not so lucky. They may live in area not suitable for dogs, have a landlord, which does not allow dogs or may just have a dog allergy. This is where I feel that the National Canine Defence League comes into its own. **What is the National Canine Defence League** The National Canine Defence League or commonly known, NCDL, is ?a registered charity which never knowingly puts a healthy dog down.? It was founded in 1891, to care for dog-welfare and provide safe and happy futures. The happiness and health of every animal is the philosophy of this charity and every effort is made to find each and every dog under their care is found a loving home for life. **Where to find Homes** This is information not in the adverts on television. The NCDL's Head Office is currently in Islington, North London. It is an administrative centre only, with no boarding, rehoming or kennel facilities. For more information contact: NCDL Head Office 17 Wakley Street London EC1V 7RQ United Kingdom At present the NCDL cares for over 11000 dogs but relies on funding from the general public to survive. There is currently a nation wide network of 16 Rehoming Centres. The staff seem dedicated, ensuring that the Centres remain loving environments for the abandoned and mistreated dogs which end up in their care. Ballymena Bridgend Canterbury Darlington Dumfries Evesham Kenilworth Leeds Ilfracombe Merseyside Newbury Roden Salisbury Shoreham Snetterton West Calder **Sponsorship** Talked about in the television advertising. There are dogs, all over the United Kingdom, that - through no fault of their own - may never find another home. This country is suppose to be a nation of animal
                          lovers yet dogs continue to be badly treated, some neglected and others abandoned. For as little as £1.00 a week, you can sponsor a dog of your choose, that cannot be rehomed, helping to provide food, meet veterinary fees and generally help to provide the tender loving care that these abused dogs deserve for the rest of their days. In return for your sponsorship, an information pack on the dog of your choice is sent out along with a newsletter, containing updates about the dogs and the continuing work, carried out by the NCDL. There is also free third party insurance for your dog, covering you up to £1 million if your dog causes an accident. (A Canine Care Card - providing care for your dog even in the event of your death). The Wag! magazine and a Gift catalogue three times a year. Then there is also A Dog is For Life car sticker, with with the NCDL's slogan. (Ideal in car windows, but out of the driver's vision). Then there is the free Pet Care Advice, run by knowledgable staff. This sponsorship can now be completed online too. Now there is now excuse for not having a pet! **For more information** Telephone: 0345 400 600 or 020 7837 0006 Or Website: www.sponsoradog.org or www.ncdl.org.uk

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                            04.06.2001 04:50
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                            The National Canine Defence League was founded in 1891 with one mission in mind: to help all dogs who are treated badly or in need. The NCDL has done a lot of good work since its beginnings and is always running new projects to help our four legged friends. Recently they have been involved in tagging dogs so they know their whereabouts. Overall this is an excellent organisation with over 300,000 members. However I feel that it is still in the shadow of the RSPCA and other animal welfare organisations. Hopefully they will receive more funding and help in the future.

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                            The Dogs Trust (previously called the National Canine Defence League) Hope Project was launched in 1995.