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NSPCC: National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children

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The National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC) is the UK's leading charity specialising in child protection and the prevention of cruelty to children. It has been protecting children from abuse for over 100 years. The NSPCC is the only children's charity in the UK with statutory powers enabling it to act to safeguard children at risk. The NSPCC exists to: prevent children suffering significant harm as a result of cruelty, protect children who are at risk of such harm, help children who have suffered cruelty to overcome its effects, work to protect children from further harm

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      29.10.2008 01:15
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      A childrens charity providing a range of services for children

      The NSPCC is in my opinion one of the best charities in the UK. Of course that means they're up there with about 100 others that I think are great but that doesn't take away from their greatness, it just means that we're fortunate in this country to have so many charities who do such amazing work.
      Five years ago I couldn't have told you much about what the NSPCC do. I watched their adverts and was moved by them, I used their website to help me complete essays on child abuse but I never really thought about what else it is they do to stop child abuse.
      Of course raising awareness of child abuse issues and educating people about child abuse is an important part of their work but what I hadn't realised is that they do a lot of work directly with children and their families. Work that in my opinion should be funded by the government. It is a shame on our country that we have to have voluntary organisations stepping in to provide services that should be a priority for the government.
      The NSPCC have a vast number of different services all around the country working with children and their families. They have services that provide support for families after a child has been abused, services that help families where the children are at high risk of being abused, services that work with children who display sexually harmful behaviour, services that investigate alleged perpetrators of sexual abuse, services that offer therapy to survivors of abuse and of course they have three helplines; childline providing support for children and young people, the helpline for adults to call and the Child Trafficking Advice and Information Line.
      Child protection is the UK would not be where it is without the great work of the NSPCC. I think that the work they do directly with children is inspiring and life changing for those recieving the services. They provide useful training to professionals which I think is very valuable and the information available on NSPCC inform is possibly the best database on childabuse on the internet that I've come accross.
      Like all charities they do have to spend a lot of money on fundraising and I don't like that so much. I would much rather the money was going on direct services or raising awareness of child abuse issues and campaigning which I think is equally as important. However, I think this is a problem with our society that so much money has to go into persuading people to support charities rather than a problem with the charity.

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      11.01.2008 02:25
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      i dont know how to summaries this sorry

      After finding out a child we new was being sexually abused and her parents not only new about this but were repeatedly sending her to stay over night at the same house that the abuser lived in i decided it was my duty to tell the authorities, a lot of people think i was wrong for doing this but the way i saw it it was my responsibility as an adult to do my best to protect this little girl.

      I didnt know where to phone or who i needed to tell so i looked on a search engine on the net to see if that could tell me but all that i could find was the nspcc.

      Not wanting to take up there time i thought i would give them a quick call to see if they could tell me where to phone because i thought the nspcc was just for children to phone for help but it wasnt.

      They said they would deal with it all for me, took all my details and all the details of the child and the abuser. The lady i spoke to was lovely.

      She was very supportive and helpful. She made me feel that i was definatley doing the right thing and told me to call her any time i wanted to discuss this case with her. I have never phoned as she has much more important things to do than waste her time talking with me.

      She passed all the details on to the police and child protection and that got the ball rolling.

      In all that has happened in this case so far the nspcc are the only ones i have found helpfull and if i can find a section suitable i will tell you the rest about the polices handling of this case.

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      06.01.2008 22:10
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      I dont know what I would have done without the help off the N.S.P.C.C

      The National Society for the prevention of Cruelty to children (N.S.P.C.C). help ouit families for lots of reasons, the obvious one is to prevent cruelty to children, but they helped me in a different way on two occassions.

      I do Apologise if this is in the wrong category


      The reason I needed help

      As a lot of you will know I have three children, my eldest son is 9 years, my daughter is 7 years and my youngest son is six years old. I had my eldest son when I was 19 years old, being so young myself, I really did`nt know anything about bringing up kids at that stage.

      At first every thing was fine, but when my eldest son hit the age of 2 all my problems started, his behaviour was hectic, but it was`nt for attention as he got loads of attention from both myself and his father.

      The behaviour continued from the age of 2 years until he was about 6 or 7 years.


      Some of the things he did

      Climbed on bedroom window sills
      Wracked his cot
      Pushed my youngest son down the stairs
      Set fire to my kitchen in the early hours
      Can be very destructful
      banged his head of the walls

      This is just some of the things he has done, if I went on I would be here all night.


      Effects on family life

      We had tried everything, shouting, a tap on the hand and as he got older we started to ground him, but nothing seemed to work, my husband and I were constantly arguing and things were not much better with my son, at this stage I did`nt feel as if we had a close relationship, obviously I love him with all my heart, but with the constant arguing our family seemed to be falling apart and as a result my other two children suffered as well.


      Medical professionals

      We went to the doctor- he replied this is all normal, but did`nt give us any other advice, the same with the health visitor, she was even less helpful.


      First referral to the N.S.P.C.C

      With no where else to turn I went to The Parent Support Officer in the school, which my kids attend, I told her about my sons behaviour, She told me I could make a self referral to the N.S.P.C.C, I said yes and she filled in the paperwork witch only took a few seconds.

      I waited approximately 10 days and was contacted by the N.S.P.C.C, they made arrangements for me to meet with a member of their staff on a weekly basis at the school, I done a parenting course and it lasted 11 weeks.

      We would disscuss the behaviours of my son and she would advise me on ways to deal with it.


      Methods to deal with naughty behaviour

      Star Chart - For each part of the day, if my son was good he would recieve a star on his chart, but if he was bad he did`nt get one, if he got all three stars he would be rewarded a small treat

      Time Out - If he misbehaved he had to stand in a naughty spot for every year of his life.

      Withdrawal of toys - If he was bad I withdrew a toy which he liked.

      I tried all of these methods and found that the time out worked for us.



      The second referral

      Again it was for Behaviour, but this time it was my youngest son who was causing the problem, I was refered in the same way as before but this time they made home visits.

      She give pretty much the same advice as before, but I think this time I just needed a kick up the backside for leting things slip.


      A big thank you

      We really appreciate the help which we recieved from the N.S.P.C.C, They helped us get our family back on track and my relationship with my son has greatly improved, we are closer than ever all thanks to the N.S.P.C.C.

      Thanks for reading

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        22.11.2003 23:00
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        A personal story

        I could not find the right category to put this in, so apologies if I have got it totally wrong. first off, I am going to say thank you to a couple of kindred spirits I have met on here, who have given me the motivation to write this. You know who you are i guess.

        My story differs a little from some i have read on here, and I don't want to complicate it too much, so I will spare you too much detail.

        i was adopted to save an ailing marriage - back in the 1950's this was a common and acceptable practice. provided the adopting parents were seen to be church- goers and the home was clean that was mostly all that was required.

        I was fostered for four years before i was adopted, and during that time i was physically, sexually and mentally abused. the year after the adoption my parents split up and my step father ran off with me.

        I suppose, by his own lights, he did his best. he left me in a caravan in a field, and went off to work at a market. I was 8 years old and I saw him once a week. To say I
        spent hours being scared is a bit of an understatement.

        Over the next 10 years i was abused, sexually, more than once. My stepfather worked nights, where-ever we lived - and so its fair to say i bought myself up. my stepmother never showed any interest in my wellbeing until I was due to leave school, when she "interviewed" me for a few minutes, to ascertain whether i was fit to live with her!! Needless to say I didn't! I disliked her intensely and I still do.

        By the time I was 16 I found it very hard to communicate with people. I had very few friends and didn't fit in with people at school. I married my first serious boyfriend, and how he coped with me I don't know. I was very immature and it was my husband who cared for my stepfather when he had cancer, whilst I ended up doing the rounds of counsellors and so on. I narrowly avoided a complete breakdown and went on to have children.

        In common with most people who post here on this particular subject, I staggered through the next few years, on the surface OK and a total mess underneath.
        I suffered flashbacks and periods of intense anger, but could I cry?! I tried hard to be liked, at any cost so I laughed too loud, tried to hard and hated myself. I took refuge in eating and often sleeping too.

        In my 42nd year my husband died and it was then I had to grow up and make decisions. I can honestly say that at first it wasn't easy, but I realised that by staying a victim it would mean that my "monsters" had won, and it suddenly became vitally important that I should be able to get free of my past and make my own world secure.

        I tried joining different clubs, but found I was in the proverbial square in a round hole sort of scenario, so eventually I begun my own group with the help of a local voluntary umbrella group. On the first day there were just six of us, within a few months we numbered 70! I was shocked at the response, to put it mildly.

        I immersed myself in helping other women with various emotional issues, of whatever sort. I worked 24/7 for seven years and learned so much. I did local radio work and wrote articles and I had so much feedback and met so many women who refused to give in - no matter what.

        I stopped saying words like "if" and "but". Try it, because we all stop ourselves from moving forward by negating what we can do with those simple words. "Listen" to yourself and you will see what I mean.

        I learned how to listen and how to give constructive advice. In listening you can reflect back on situations that you are familiar with and perhaps view it differently.

        I found that if all your choices are rotten, choose one anyway, because that way the muddle that surrounds you starts to clear.

        I learned to look back and think about the good things in those years. An adopted family who stood by me and helped me, when they had so little themselves. They taught me about unconditional love and they still mean everything to me. They were and are my inspiration.
        An excellent teacher, who gave me some self belief. Some wonderful friends.

        I learned that children that are abused are NOT to blame, that they don't need to apologise or try harder than anyone else. The adults who should have protected, nurtured and loved you failed YOU. I read a book called "women survivors of sexual abuse in childhood" - something that I found unbearably hard - but found that there were other people "out there" who could identify with the notion that you could stand in a crowd and scream and scream and not be heard.

        I learned that only 50% of your acquaintances will ever really like you, but that's really OK, because their affection is the only affection that counts.

        In the last year, since I gave up my self imposed task, I have learned to be alone and to be comfortable with it - a real achievement for me I promise you. I have learned to be peaceful and at peace. I know I can survive alone, but not be lonely.

        I have never expected to be "happy" - but I am content.

        I will end by offering this thought. In some ways the pain will never go away - there will always be odd moments when things get a bit tougher than usual, but it is a temporary blip and not a life sentence.

        My mantra is that "I will survive and prosper despite you" and my belief is that no-one - absolutely no-one - is worth the pain that you have suffered. Your revenge is to live your life in freedom and self belief.

        Love and luck and thank you for reading this. I do hope that it offers something positive.

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          02.08.2002 00:05
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          Dear World Hi my names Billy, I’m twelve years old. I used to live with my mum and dad but I don’t anymore because they used to hit me a lot when I was naughty. I was about six when it started, my dad had just lost his job and the money they got from the government wasn’t enough so he got angry a lot and used to hit my mum and me. My mum blamed me for making him angry and she started hitting me as well. For six years I used to sleep awkwardly in my bed because of the bruises on my back and most nights I would cry myself to sleep. I didn’t have many toys because we didn’t have much money so I was bored and just used to draw. I got quite good at drawing but my mum and dad didn’t like my pictures so they would make me rip them up or burn them. I had to do it because they would just hit me if I didn’t. I couldn’t tell anyone, because Mum and Dad told me that if I did, I would get taken away and wouldn’t see them again and I had nowhere to go. I still loved my mum and dad and they kept saying that they loved me so I was really confused as to why they would keep hurting me. I have friends now, a girl called Georgia who was my age took a load of coloured pills just like me. She told me that her dad would come into her room and touch her every night. He never hit her but in a way she says she would have preferred it if he had. Imagine that, preferring to be beaten black and blue. One thing we have in common that we are both confused about is that our parents cried at our funerals. Signed: Billy aged 12 The NSPCC ********** The NSPCC is not just about a helpline, as I must admit I thought it was. They do so many other things. They tirelessly campaign with MP’s to put child protection at the top of political agenda’s. They have people researching the effects and causes of child abuse so that they can try to deal with some of the pr
          oblems at an early stage rather than just pick up the pieces after the damage has been done. They also have over 180 local teams and projects around the UK. They can go around to houses and assess the risk to young people living there. If they feel that there is a significant risk of abuse they can take steps to move the child away – but this is only as a last resort if education, rehabilitation and everything else fail. They are not in the business of splitting families up if they can possibly avoid it, all they are concerned with is the safety of the child. In fact they will actively support parents to try and deal with the causes that any abuse has risen from. I think they are an excellent charity and whilst there are other worthy charities for the blind and the deaf, for people with disabilities and diseases, the NSPCC will always be top of my list. The reason is they are trying to help abused children have a childhood filled with something other than fear and pain. Apparently only a fraction of children suffering regular sexual abuse come forward. That means that thousands of children are suffering in silence to scared to speak and to afraid to run. The Helpline ********** This is obviously the mainstay of the organisation as trained counsellors are available 24 hours a day 7 days a week on a Freephone number. People can ring up anonymously if they wish and speak to someone about a child who they think may be at risk. Children themselves can ring up and speak to someone that can give them options, advice and a hand of support and friendship. The Web Page ************ http://www.nspcc.org.uk has lots of pages to find out everything there is to know about the NSPCC and what you should do if you have reason to believe a child you know is at risk. There is also a page where you can donate for free and a few people on dooyoo have this link on their profile page. Basically the idea is
          that you visit this page once a day and click a bright green button. When you do that a donation of around £0.02. will be sent to the NSPCC. The Cost of Care ************* NSPCC fundraisers managed to raise £21.3 million and they use every penny to improve and save the lives of thousands and thousands of children across the UK. How can we help ************** I don’t work for the NSPCC and as much as I support their cause, I’m not going to preach to you how little it costs, if you look at their web site and are captivated as I was at the good work, then no preaching will be required. What I would ask you to do is copy this hyperlink http://www.nspcc.org.uk/donate-4-free/default.asp and put it in your favourite links on your profile page. Then every day click on it and earn them 2p. It will take less than ten seconds to do and cost you nothing and if enough of us do it, then maybe it will help. If you are taking part in a local marathon or sporting event, or doing a bungee jump or an absail for fun, why not request a sponsorship pack from the NSPCC and combine your activity with raising some cash for them. I was never abused as a child, I got the occasional slap, just as most people did and I remember the feeling that I had when I knew I had done something wrong and I had to wait to be punished. Most times I would have to wait a few hours, I couldn’t imagine having that feeling a permanent part of me for years……I would rather kill myself…..but then again, I wouldn’t have to if only there were someone to talk to. If you need the number for the NSPCC helpline - 0808 800 5000

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            12.10.2001 05:18
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            OH MY GOD, I CANT EVEN LOOK AT THE ADVERT PROBABLY, SEEING A YOUNG CHILD WHO'S BEEN BEAT UP BY HIS 'PARENT' A PERSON WHO IS SUPPOSED TO LOVE AND CHERISH THIER CHILD, LOOK AFTER HIM/HER. I READ ANOTHER OPINION ABOUT THIS SITE TODAY AND I TOTALLY AGREE WITH THAT READER, THIS SITE IS TOTALLY HEARTBREAKING, BUT YET INTERESTING. I WAS PARTICALLY INTERESTED ABOUT THE 'HANDS OFF' SEXUALLY ABUSE SECTION. Anyone WHO WATCHES EASTENDERS WILL UNDERSTAND THE PAIN AND TORMENT OF BEING RAPED OR SEXUALLY ABUSED, THATS WHY THIS SITE IS SO MUCH APPRECIATED. The NSPCC STARTED TO PROTECT INICENT CHILDREN OVER 100 YEARS AGO, SINCE THEN THEY HAVE IMPROVED MILLIONS OF CHILDRENS LIVES. LAUNCHED IN MARCH 1999 THE FULL STOP CAMPAIGN IS ALREADY SIGNIFICALLY INCREASING THE AWARNESS OF THE ISSUES SURROUNDING CHILD ABUSE. THEY AIM TO DEVELOPSOME NEW APPROACHESTO CHILD PROTECTION WHICH RESPOND SENSITIVELY TO CHILDREN AND WHICH REFLECTS THEIR NEEDS, CONCERNS AND FEARS. ''Child abuse can be prevented, but children who have already been abused still need protection. Often violence and abuse can start with something quite small and apparently insignificant''. THAT IS ONE OF THE MANY THOUGHT BREAKING QUOTES FROM THE POWERFUL SITE. THE SITE ITESLF HAS A NUMBER OF DIFFERENT LINKS, RANGING FROM 'CHILDREN INFORMATION TO ADULT INFORMATION TO JOB VACANCIES. THE NSPCC NEEDS FUNDING TO HELP SUPPORT THEIR PROTECTIVE HELP AND SUPPORT. SINCE VISITING THIS SITE, I HAVE NOW DECIDED THAT IM GOING TO HELP THOSE INICENT LIITLE CHILDREN AND START DOING THINGS FOR OTHER PEOPLE INSTEAD OF MYSELF. THEY NEED OUR HELP, PLEASE VISIT THE SITE AND SEE IF YOU AGREE WITH ME, WE HAVE TO START HELPING. THANK YOU FOR TAKING YOUR TIME TO READ MY OPINION. XX

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              11.10.2001 21:45
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              I consider myself as a very liberal human being and believe that I can handle many difficult situations, events and happenings that go on in everyday society. What I cannot tolerate though is to see a child who has been beaten so badly and yet they cannot speak out for one of two reasons. Firstly out of fear that if they do they will be subject to the same punishment if they do and secondly because they are unaware of whom to contact. It makes my blood boil to see pictures of these children with black eyes, broken bones, burns and belt (or similar) marks all over their body. The NSPCC, short for The National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, addresses this issue to the fullest. I visited the site today and remained there for over an hour since this is one thing that definitely does get my attention and I hope it gets yours too. .You would be startled at some of the facts: · Each week at least one child dies following abuse and neglect. · Around 36,000 children are on child protection registers. · 350,000 to 400,000 children live in families which are "consistently low in warmth and high in criticism" · About one-third of girls and over one-fifth of boys (aged between 12 and 15) said they were afraid, at least sometimes, to go to school because of bullying · 26% of recorded rape victims are children These statistics are chilling and should be enough to open up anyone’s eyes. Every week one child dies following abuse and neglect and this is really hard to believe but it’s happening. There are many ways in which we, as human beings, can help these suffering children and they will not take much out of you. 1) Donate – The NSPCC’s Full Stop Campaign was launched on 22nd March 1999 and is spearheaded by the HRH Duke of York. The aim is raise £250 Million and this is the largest appeal ever launched by a British Charity organization. You can donat
              e directly at their website by using your credit card. The website address is mentioned at the bottom of this op. They have also set up collection tins at many shopping centers throughout Britain and presently have over 150 of them. If you see one please spare a thought for the children and drop some change into them. 2) Raising funds - You can get involved in a wide range of fundraising activities. The Help to Fundraise page gives information and advice on how you can help, or you can download our information pack on fundraising. 3) Events - We hold a wide range of sponsored events that you can take part in too. Everything from running in the London Marathon or trekking and cycling in overseas challenges, to playing in a national golf tournament. 4) Companies and Organisations - The corporate sector also plays a very important role in our campaign to end cruelty to children. Have a look at How can your company help? to find out more. And if you're a union member, you can help the NSPCC through your subs - see United for Children for details. 5) Raising Awareness - Perhaps you're interested in campaigning on behalf of the NSPCC to help raise awareness of the problem of child abuse? If so, download our information pack on campaigning to learn about the ways you could help transform the lives of children at risk of abuse and neglect. 6) Volunteering - The NSPCC has local branches throughout England, Wales and Northern Ireland where volunteer fundraisers provide vital support for the NSPCC's work. Why not take a look at how you can fundraise in your area? The above points from 2 – 6 has been listed word for word from the NSPCC’s website as I wanted everyone to get the full and exact picture on this important issue. All sections provide you with a clickable link so that you can get precise information about how you can be of help. The main purpose of this FULL STOP campaign is to provide additional means
              in which to combat this horrible attribute in human life, once and for all and these are: ·To make it easier for children to access NSPCC services. ·They will be able to help up to 100,000 children every year - 5 times more than at present. ·To be able to deal with more calls to the NSPCC Child Protection Helpline and offer the service in Welsh and all major Asian languages. ·They plan to start exciting initiatives in the education system, such as schools counselling teams. By 2002 NSPCC schools services will reach children in nine education authorities. ·They will help local neighbourhoods become Child Friendly Action Zones, in which everyone will work together to meet the needs of children. ·They will start a major study to reveal the real extent of child abuse in the UK. ·They will double the number of valuable new services such as the NSPCC Paedophile Investigation Units. ·They will develop our parenting education, including an NSPCC baby magazine and year book for parents of all babies born in the UK from 2000 onwards. Finally this is a problem that affects the whole world. However it is important that we first stamp this out in our own backyard and then look at the situation on a more global basis. One thing that still flabbergasts me is that we supposedly live in a advanced society and in a first world country but why do we have such alarmingly high cases of child abuse and cruelty. So everyone out there please visit, the NSPCC’s website at: www.nspcc.org and find out how you can help. I personally fully intend to offer some donation and try to engage myself in some of the activities.

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                09.09.2001 18:15
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                I have now been able to donate my £10 to the NSPCC. Thank you for reading my opinions so i can donate this money to this worthy course, as i am sure you will agree. There are many chuildren needlessly suffering and any small donation will go towards a big sum which will be used to give these children a better life. Once again thank you for reading my opinions, I am sure the charity are also grateful and thank you. yep yep yep yep yep (75 words)

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                  03.09.2001 16:31
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                  I cannot stand it when people collecting for charity rattle tins in front of my face or stand each side of the doors to supermarkets rattling the tins for you. I have been on the other side and done the collecting and yes I know that sometimes it is like getting blood from a stone to get people to collect. I would also like to do more for charities and so this site is great. If like me you are sitting at the computer just browsing, reading other peoples opinions or writing opinions then you do have a couple of minutes to spare. For this site that is all it takes. Put it in your favourites, click on it, click on the big green circle and hey you have just donated £0.08 to a great charity. You havent moved from your seat, you feel good and you can do it daily. Although you havent actually paid the cash from your pocket it is nice to know where it goes. Donations are for the NSPCC and gives parents the confidence and skills needed to care for a child properly. It gives damaged children the will to live again following the realisation that they are more than a victim of abuse. On this site it gives you a great insite to the help the NSPCC gives and the work and how you can help. I havent known this site long but yes I feel good that I am doing my bit daily. If just one other person does the same and goes on daily it will be great. The site is www.nspcc.org.uk

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                    13.02.2001 05:23
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                    I write this after much thought and in fear and trepidation. You see I think that expressing even the mildest criticism of the NSPCC is similar to knocking the good old Queen Mum or questioning the motives of Mother Teresa. Along with every right thinking person I have to say that I completely and utterly detest all forms of mental or physical abuse of children. However I don’t think that the NSPCC should be above criticism or that their campaigns and fundraising can go unquestioned. The current Full Stop Campaign in particular trades on people’s anger at child abuse and asks the public to sign up to pledge an end to child abuse. I think that this is misleading on a number of accounts. The NSPCC is not the first charity to solicit donations on promises that cannot be kept. In particular I recall the National Children’s Homes (NCH) campaign “House our Youth 2000” where, in return for a donation, NCH would end youth homelessness by the year 2000. Of course by the year 2000 this huge campaign was quietly dropped, having singularly failed in the declare aim, though probably successful in it’s fundraising aim. Is the NSPCC Full Stop Campaign going the same way? Ending child abuse is a fine and laudable aim, but is it realistic? Sadly I think not. As much as we may hate abuse and fight against it I do not think it is realistic to say that we can end it. I find the campaign cynical and misleading. Am I alone in thinking that child protection is the legal duty of Local Authority Social Services Departments and should not be the place for charities? I know that the response to this is that often Social Services let down young people and time and again they get severely criticised in inquiries into appalling cases of child abuse. The reality is that Social Services protect many thousands of children a year – the mistakes, which can have such awful consequences – represent
                    a tiny fraction of all cases. I only wish the general public could give the same level of support to overworked local authority social workers as they give to the NSPCC. I would love to be proved wrong and be forced to eat my words when the NSPCC is able say they have met the pledge of ending child abuse, but that’s not going to happen. When will the slick, highly professional and extremely well paid fundraisers at all the major charities realise that at some stage the giving public are going to hold them to account for their cynical promises. The public will only be fooled for so long.

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