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Large Metal Apex Shed

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£219.89 Best Offer by: amazon.co.uk See more offers
2 Reviews

Brand: Others / Product Type: Metal Shed

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    2 Reviews
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      11.04.2011 19:42
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      A home-build project best suited to those who like pain, frustration and anguish

      We needed to have some serious building work carried out on our house a couple of years ago, and having had a look at the cost of renting storage for our furniture while this was underway, decided to buy a metal shed to keep the rain off all our furniture, household item and possessions instead.

      We selected a metal shed firstly because they were slightly cheaper to buy than their equivalently-sized, timber-constructed counterparts. Secondly, the previous owner of our house had left not one, but a pair of rotting wooden sheds falling apart in the garden when she moved out. As it had taken a lot of effort to demolish and cart away the old timber sheds, I was none too keen to put an identical wooden replacement up where they had once been.

      A six-by-six apex metal shed cost about £200 from a business seller on Ebay back when I purchased one. These sheds are available in a range of sizes, from ones with the smallest dimension being about four feet, to the largest, a 10 by 13 foot behemoth. Ours is a lower / mid-range version, about six foot square. From 'proper internet sellers' - such as the folk who sell via amazon.co.uk, a metal shed will cost you substantially more than £200 these days, but there still many people on ebay who will sell you a new one for a lot less.

      There is of course a catch with these garden buildings, and it is a pretty huge one; namely, the sheds are self-build constructions that you have to piece together from a vast number of relatively tiny panels, all from scratch. And the building up of the shed is a massive undertaking in itself.

      For example, my six foot shed arrived in a surprisingly small box - very heavy, certainly, but no more than four feet high, two feet long and about 12 inches deep . From this worryingly small package, you have to construct the framework of the shed, the ridgepole, the sides of the building, the roof, the doors - and you can see there's going to be a heck of a lot of bolting short bits together to get the job done. The various panels are, of necessity, made from incredibly thin metal: it's no coincidence that like the other dooyoo reviewer of this shed, me and my partner (quite independently) made the joke that there was no point in trying to lock it because anyone who really wanted to get into it would be able to rip through the side with an ordinary tin-opener in about two seconds flat. On that issue, the 'lockable' aspect of these sheds must refer to the holes that are built into the plastic door 'handles' (these are basically naff bits of black plastic that just allow you enough hand-space to notionally "slide" the door panels open and closed - and I put the inverted commas around the word 'slide' because this shed's doors don't). Presumably you're intended to slip a padlock through the holes - but the plastic handles are so insubstantial that a I think good kick, much less a light wrench from a crowbar, would be enough to break them off).

      So, to summarize, the apex shed once built is surprisingly flimsy, and the home-construction job to put it up is all insanely complex to do and takes forever (about four days working flat out, between the two of us - me and my partner; neither of us much good at DIY, but no strangers to making up flat-pack furniture, either). If we hadn't 'had' to do it - ie. build the shed on the spot so we could clear the house out before the builders came - I would've been so dismayed by the relatively poor quality of the product and complexity of the shed building task that I'd have happily written off the £200 and just chucked it all in as a bad job.

      Still, our metal shed did the job required of it - namely, to keep our possessions safe and secure - but only after a fashion. A lot of the fabrics that were stored in it went mouldy, because in the rain, the little holes in the side of shed (that are supposed to be there) let in the damp and then it can't get out again. And the door of the shed is incredibly flimsy and doesn't shut properly; this arrangement is a real weak-point in the shed's otherwise so-so design, as the doors are sliders on runners the rails of which aren't nearly robust enough to keep them in a straight line - or even from dragging along the floor. Anyway, because of the gaps in our shed's door, mice got in and ruined much of our kitchen stuff and a lot of books had to be thrown away. So I wouldn't say that this shed in my experience is 'rodent proof' - something the manufacturers claim. But the furniture and everything that could be washed down or cleaned properly did survive.

      What you get for your £200 (or whatever) if you spend it on an apex metal shed is a garden building that's difficult to access, not much good for storing anything that isn't made of solid wood or metal in (because of the mildew and damp), and is surprisingly flimsy once you've managed to put it up. With their green and white paint jobs and faintly shipping-container-like appearance, these sheds don't look fantastic to me, but if you've got somewhere you can 'hide' yours away - behind another building; in a hollow of the landscape or something - that certainly helps. They also need to be properly moored (ie. screwed or bolted down or however you secure things to concrete) on proper hard-standing with a flat base to stand on if you've any intention of getting in and out of the door on a regular basis; we put ours on an area of concrete that LOOKED flat enough, but the slight variation in profile / aspect was enough to ensure we can't open the door properly, so now we're using it as a 'traditional' garden shed, it's a real headache trying to get at anything that's still in there.

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      • More +
        03.01.2010 21:24
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        Dont touch these.

        These are the horror of any D.I.Yer.They can be bought almost anywhere and tempt people in by the idea of never needing to paint them.
        True as that may be.They are an absolute pain.They come delivered in a box that makes you wonder where the rest of it is.Believe me ,it is all in there.
        If you have a large garden like myself.You get the luxury of laying out this mecanno style shed out on the floor.
        And you probably would do a better and easier job with the mecanno.
        It takes approx 2 men,2 hours it states on the description.However it took 2 men who build things as a living,most of a full day to build with very strict organisation.
        It is a ridiculous shed that is completely undurable.If you manage to seal all the leaks,the condensation will soak everything inside.

        The appearance is quite acceptable,but no one buys a shed as a garden ornament.Which at the moment is all mine is fit to do.

        The doors are extremely stiff to open,and even harder to close.Making a serious racket when you do try and close them.

        My husband laughed when I told him to put a lock through the plastic door handles ,as they can easily be ripped of.And in his words."What is the point of putting a lock on ,when a can opener would get in through the side?"

        Fair point,it will probably be ripped down and ebayed as soon as I can save up for a breeze block shed.Buy cheap ,buy twice definately applies to this horrific piece of engineering.Stay away.Keep your money.

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      • Product Details

        This large standard metal apex building comes in green/white and has double lockable doors. It also has mid-wall bracing for extra rigidity and is rot, rodent and fire proof