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Callestock Cider Farm (Cornwall)

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7 Reviews

Scrumpy to Sparkling Ciders, Country Wines, Mead, a range of natural fruit juices and Jams, Chutneys, Mustard and Honey, we plus Cornish Apple Brandy and Fruit Liquers. Callestock Cider Farm, Penhallow, Truro, Cornwall.

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      22.09.2009 13:57
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      Pleaseant Surroundings Fantastic Staff.

      I visited Callestick Cider Farm whilst visiting Cornwall in July. The Cider tasting section is a must for everyone. I tried many varities of Wine and Cider all free before selecting my favourites for purchasing. I also visited the little shop where again you can taste all products prior to purchase. It was fantastic to walk around and see the making of the cider etc. The petting farm was amazing and the staff very knowledgeable about the animals in the petting area. There were several goats due to give birth at any time. There were facilities to disinfect your hands after petting the animals. My favourite was the little goat who kept head butting my leg he was a real cutey. The staff are fantastic. Everyone is so friendly. You can take the tour which unfortunately we did not have time to take.
      Plenty of areas if you take a picnic. Ample Parking facilities.
      This is a place you must visit if you are in the area. Would definately return on my next visit to Cornwall.

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        25.03.2009 18:47

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        I have been here twice and loved it as a child and an adult. As an adult it is worth travelling the 250 odd miles from my home just to get some Scrumpy, but just as good is the strawberry wine which is delicious. The wines come in really beautiful bottles, too.

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        29.08.2008 13:06
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        A lovely day out especially for adults!

        I am a man and I love Cider this is the main reason why I love the Cornish Cyder Farm (formerly Callestock Cider Farm).The farm goes a way back in history in fact it is about 150 years old. The farm is the largest Cider maker throughout Cornwall. Since 1986 the farm has been run by David and Kay Healey. For 5 years the farm has been voted 'The nations favourite farm attraction'. Entrance to the farm is free, although you will need to pay for the guided tour, tractor rides and other extras. The farm is home to a few animals such as goats, chickens, ponies and horses.

        The best thing about the farm is probably the free samples of cider, although the sample sizes are a little small. They do also have other tasting session such as jams, preserves, chutney and wine.
        They also have guided tours of the museum which shows the history of the farm. This is quite interesting and enjoyable. You can see everyone at work making it as you walk around which adds to the atmosphere and reminds us that we are on a real working farm.
        A full tour cost us £6.00. We don't have children but I think it cost £3 children. The tour included a tractor ride around the farm. The tractor ride will take you through the orchards to see where the apples are grown and this is very fun especially after a few ciders. After your trip around the farm if you do want to sample
        The shop stock a wide variety of products such as cider (no really they do!), bottles of wine, jams and preserves, t-shirts, key-rings, hats etc.

        There is a lot to do and the farm is lovely during the summer so it is very nice sitting outside with a meal and a glass of cold cider. We had fun making pots in the pottery and it was quite cheap, one of those things you can't forget and you have somet5hing to take home with you, although my pot looked more like something you'd find on the floor in the stables.

        The Cornish Cyder Farm is a lovely day out and is quite easy to find between Newquay and Truro near a place called Penhallow. We hope to go back when the kids go back to school. We have been a few times and even if the weather is poor its possible to have a good day with lots to do.

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          12.03.2006 22:34
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          A great Day out for the family, with plenty for all to see and do.

          It was 1986, and we were on our honeymoon in Cornwall. We had gone out exploring and sampling the country. Out in the middle of nowhere we found a small little farm. It seemed no different to other farms, but it did have the added bonus of having a cider production going on. So we decided to stop for a while and enjoyed a meal in the small restaurant.

          Around the back a few animals were housed and empty barns had been used to give a brief tour into the Cider making business.

          It was, quiet, it was lovely, and it was memorable.

          Loving it so much we returned two years later with our twins. The restaurant had expanded, and a car park had been made on the opposite field. A couple of years after that, a shop appeared, then the tour became more sophisticated and a charge was added. Now ten years on it is a booming tourist attraction.

          It is noisy, it is crowded, but it is still memorable.

          But despite its fame, when you flick through the leaflets left in your self catering accommodation, it is very rare you will come across one for the Cyder Farm. So here is the low down and all you need to know.


          ***History***

          The Farm was bought by the current owners in 1986. They bought it simply in order to revive the almost forgotten art of cider making. They planted Orchards, renovated and adapted buildings and in 1988 converted a former cowshed into a Jam kitchen. They adopted the phrase ‘Legless but smiling’ and this is now their famous logo. They have won a number of awards and are ‘The nations favourite farm attraction’ and are one of the top tourist attractions in Corwall. During this renovation the name also got changed from Callestock Cider Farm, to The Cornish Cyder Farm.



          ***Getting There***

          The Farm is situated near the villages of callestick and Penhallow.

          To get there You can either come off the A3075 redruth/Newquay Road or the main A30 which runs the length of Cornwall. For both roads take the road sign posted Callestick. There are some brown tourist signs dotted about apparently, but on each occasion we have visited we have failed to spot them.

          The only way to get there is by Car or on an organised coach trip. Public transport is just not an option!


          ***Opening Times and prices***

          The Farm is open from Mid January to the end of December. Though can be closed some weekends in the Winter. They are open from 10am to 5pm, but this may be extended during the warmer and lighter months.

          The Farm, shop and Restaurant are all Free to enter.

          For the Guided Tour, the prices are:-

          Adults £5.00
          Seniors £4.00
          Children £3.00

          Under 6 years are free.


          ***Arriving***

          When you get there you will be directed to the free car park. This is simply just a field opposite with a bit of tarmac in places. It can get very muddy so be prepared. There are some toilets here which are very handy.

          The entrance to the Farm is across the track you enter on, It is also the pick up/drop off point for the tractor ride, so keeping young children close is ideal. The tractor ride costs around £1 for adults and 50p for children and takes you all around the Orchards.

          At the Entrance you can walk straight through to the free areas. Or you can stop and pay for the Tour and/or tractor ride at the desk. For this you will get a bright coloured stickers to proudly wear. You can come back at any time to this desk at any time therefore on busy days it could be worth going off and doing the free parts first rather than queuing for your sticker straight away.

          You are now in the front courtyard that has plenty of picnic tables both under cover and in the open. Plenty of farming articles and gadgetry with information are scattered about for your perusal. From here you can either go into the shop, Restaurant or around the back to the farm.


          ***The Farm***

          The Farm is where the tour and museum can be found, these being in the converted barns. However you are free to walk around the courtyard area where you can find a couple of horses and pigs. In the warmer weather shows can also be seen on the small arena in the centre.

          According to the website there is also a small pottery shop allows you to throw your own pot for a small charge. I don’t remember seeing this on our last visit so it is either new or wasn’t open at the time.

          With the addition of the superior tour, it seems it was the animals that had to go. On our first visit there was also a number of small animals and several horses, but these have sadly dwindled over the years.


          ***The Tour***

          As I said the Tour has been improved over time. When we first went you simply walked around the areas at your own pace looking at all the artefacts used in Cider making. This is now a guided tour and also includes the jam making. People are now at work and so you get a much better idea of what is going on. The tour is divided into areas that show you had the cider is fermented, pressed and bottled; the jam kitchen, as well as a sampling area (Yummy!); the distillery, where an 1800 litre copper pot with a special viewing glass allows visitors to see inside the still as it boils the cider; and the museum which gives an insight into the history & art of cider making. Also on display are a full Cooper's Workshop, Horse drawn Granite Mills and a Scratter Mill. Plus exhibit pieces showing the evolution of the Press, from the rather crude Cornish Beam Press, the Single Screw Press (500 years old) the Twin Screw Press (from the 1830's) and finally the Twin Screwed Geared Press of the late Victorian era.

          So much more could be said about the tours, however it would make the review very long so if you would like to know more simply pop along to the website.


          ***The Restaurant***

          The restaurant is in the top half of a large converted barn and seats 150 people. It can be reached either by a slope from the front or steps from the rear courtyard.
          On our first visit this area was the restaurant, sampling area and shop so you can see how much they have expanded.
          The food is all homemade and it truly delicious. Of course their products are featured in many of the dishes and since they are just so tasty you are then tempted to buy and take home.
          The restaurant has a selection of snacks and meals and includes a number of healthy children’s meals. (Highchairs available) I would recommend the Cidermakers Lunch which is their version of a Ploughmans. As well as around half a kilo of various cheeses, you get a selection of chutneys and a delicious home made coleslaw. I have heard that the Scrumpy Pie goes down well too.

          More toilets can be found off the Restaurant as well as a baby change area.


          ***The Shop***

          Again reached from the front courtyard or from the connecting restaurant. Here you will find all the goodies that you expect plus all the products that they produce. With over 40 varieties of fruit products, that includes cider, fruit wine, jam, marmalades and chutneys, there has to be something for everyone. Expect to pay around £2.25 for a 0.5kg jar of jam/marmalade/chutney and £3 for a 2kg bottle of cider. Slightly more than in the shops but the jars and bottles are very decorative so have plenty of uses even when the contents are finished.

          If you don’t fancy filling your suitcase with the contents of the shop you can always order online when you get home.

          If you do the tour you will get a chance to try the jams and chutneys and here in the shop you can sample the wines, cider and the newly addition, apple brandy. They can be quite strong so maybe advisable to do this when you arrive rather than just before you are about to drive home. If you prefer you can always try the fruit juices, which are just as nice.


          ***The Family’s thoughts***

          Obviously we like the place, otherwise we would not have returned several times. We have gone around the tour a few times. This was due to the fact that it has been improved and also because the children got to the age they could appreciate it more. They learnt so much and the fact that you can really get up close and see things in action is a wonderful experience. Of course the delightful smells are just a huge bonus. However on our last visit we were happy enough just to have a bite and then collect goodies from the shop.

          You can easily spend a day here if the weather is good. Although the tour is in converted barns, a lot are open fronted so you can get wet still. Plus you have to go in and out of each one to reach the next as they do not all join together.

          The Jams are full of fruit and contain little sugar which in my opinion makes them much better. The cider, or as it is traditionally called in Cornwall, Scrumpy, is above all others and a must have to bring home. Even the chutneys have me drooling and yet normally this is something I would not be bothered with. On our last visit we simply went to buy some Scrumpy apple Chutney, though I believe we came out with quite a bit more. (I need some more so if I do tempt you to visit…….)

          I am sure though, that if we ever return to Cornwall, which I am sure we will, the Cyder Farm will certainly be on our list of places to visit.

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            04.11.2003 20:35
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            Not being a big fan of alcohol or drinking I was a bit reluctant to go to the Cornish Cider Farm as I thought what could possible be interesting about a cider farm? However I was amazed at what I learnt here and the processes involved in making cider, brandy and Jam. The Cornish Cider Farm is located near the villages of Penhallow and Callestick on the A3075 and is sign posted in each direction. Its quite easy to find just follow the signs from the A30. The site is free to enter and walk around, and there is a farm area with a variety of farm animals, the cider processing room, a jam making demonstration area as well as the shop and restaurant. However if you wish to join one of the sites guided tours or go on the tractor rides around the orchard there is a charge of £5 per person. The site on first impressions is one of it?s a bit grubby until you realize that this is a working site and that certain elements on the site are there for educational purposes. The court yard is as it has been for many years and is slightly uneven in places and care must be taken whilst walking around. There are however many areas around the site to which the casual visitor has no access and this is where going on one of the guided tours is a must. The tours take in the elements of the site and tell you the process of cider making from the apple picking through to the bottling which is all done on site. Once the cider processing part of the tour has been completed you then proceed to the Jam Making exhibit which again shows you the process of making Jam from picking of the fruits to bottling. The next part of the tour is where the public have no access. This leads you through the sites cider museum and then onto the brandy making room and finally the barrel storage room. The guide throughout was both informative and witty and really made an effort to entertain us all the way through the tour. Some of the things we where tol
            d about the olde days of cider making will both amaze and disgust as will some of the materials used through this process. Once the factory tour has finished you then get to take a tour of the orchards and this is done on a trailer which is pulled round the orchards by a tractor. Again the guide for the orchard tour is both informative and entertaining. However its just a field full of apple trees! The tour and orchard tour take roughly an hour. At first we did think the Cornish Cider farm was expensive but having taken the factory tour I would say that £5 is a reasonable price. The shop on the site sells the farms products from Cider, Elderflower wine through to Jams and is reasonably priced especially for the larger volumes of cider. I did think the restaurant was a bit on the expensive side especially if you have kids, and ordering a full meal but the food was of a good quality, however I did find the scones a bit on the crumbly side. The jam however more than made up for this. Overall we spent about three and a half hours here and we enjoyed the tour immensely, but if you where to visit the site and not go on the tour the number of things to do is quite limiting. Cornish Cider farm is an amusing place to visit for a few hours if you want a change from the country houses and mines of Cornwall, however there isn?t enough to keep the younger ones entertained for a full day. The Cornish Cyder Farm, Penhallow, Truro, Cornwall, TR4 9LW Tel: 01872 573356, Fax: 01872 573056, e-mail: info@thecornishcyderfarm.co.uk © Mike Porter, Copyright 1999 ? 2003

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              14.11.2000 05:30
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              I have to admit we found this place by mistake, but I was glad we did. I have been known to enjoy a glass of cider in my years so I thought it was worth a visit. The shop was very spacious and had a massive selection; much to my surprise it was not just scrumpy. There was a large selection of country wines and some of them were quite strong, there were lots of different fruit juices and loads of Jams, Pickles etc. You could try any of the products, I have to admit I tried all of the different types of scrumpy and tried a few wines whereas my wife and children tried out the fruit juices and jams. We brought loads of scrumpy, some juice and jam; we also purchased some glasses and sweatshirts There is also a large restaurant called Scrumpy’s piggery we decided to go and have a meal and a drink. The food was lovely and reasonably priced and all of the food was homemade most of it using the products available in the shop. Unfortunately on the day we went the weather was dreadful so the tractor ride around the orchards was cancelled and the kids were not able to play out in the kids play area or with the friendly animals in the small farm, but there was still quite a bit to do. It is free to get into the shop and restaurant but for a small charge you can take a walk through the cider museum to find out All about cider making, take a look at the distillery where they make apple brandy and wander round the cellars We were staying in Cornwall on holiday and this place was about a 40-minute drive from the cottage we had rented. One morning I tried some of their Jam on my toast and was so impressed I insisted we drive back to get some more. My only complaint I have is there products are not available through mail order at the moment so when I run out I will have to go without, I cant see my wife being happy at driving 300 miles from our home to go and get some more. I have enjoyed the scrumpy very much; it
              was smooth and a pleasure to drink unlike some of the traditional scrumpy’s I have drunk in my time. The wines that I tried were also very enjoyable with some very different flavours. If you are in the area and interested in cider making then go and have a look, and remember to try the products in the shop they are great.

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                12.11.2000 18:17
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                When visiting a new place we always like to go in search of local produce. On the way back from a visit to the south coast we came across Callestock Cider Farm. It was pouring with rain and mega gales, so the Scrumpy Farm Tour was off. The place is free to get into, and after tasting a wide range of drinks, non-alcoholic as well as alcoholic. We purchased lots of Scrumpy after hubby and my parents agreed it was lovely, and it went down really well, to well if you ask me, I was driving. As I was driving I tasted the juices, which my children and I really enjoyed. My favourite was the Raspberry and Apple juice, yummy. I bought a bottle and we enjoyed it with our tea (The children and I). The farm has a Press house where they press the fruit, a farm shop where you can taste and purchase a range of juices, jams, chutneys, mustards, honeys, wines and Scrumpys. Around the farmyard children will love the farm animals. In the pottery everyone has the chance to buy a ticket and create his or her very own masterpiece. For a small charge you can visit the Cellars, Distillery and the Museum. At the distillery they make Apple Brandy and the fruit Liqueurs. There is a Jam Kitchen, where you can smell the fruit for the jams etc… simmering in traditional open kettles. Our next stop was the Scrumpy’s Piggery; this is the farms restaurant with many of the farm produce as menu items. The children had a Jacket Potato filled with Cheese and Baked Beans; I had homemade Soup, and the rest an assortment of filled Baguettes. The food was lovely and we all had a massive cup of Hot Chocolate except for Lucy, who had a glass of Raspberry and Apple Juice. Callestock Cider Farm, Penhallow, Truro, signposted off the A3075 Newquay Road at Penhallow in Cornwall. They are open all year, Monday to Friday, 9am – 5pm (Except from the end of December to mid January. Easter to the end of October, Monda
                y to Saturday, 9am – 6pm. Whit sun to the end of October Sunday 10am – 6pm. July and August, Monday – Friday until 8pm November and December weekends’ 12noon – 3pm

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